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Publication numberUS1968263 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1934
Filing dateDec 8, 1932
Priority dateDec 8, 1932
Publication numberUS 1968263 A, US 1968263A, US-A-1968263, US1968263 A, US1968263A
InventorsReuther Bernard O
Original AssigneeEdna S Reuther, Minnie F Steele
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drinking tumbler
US 1968263 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 31, 1934- B. o. REUTHER DRINKING TUMBLER Filed Deo. s, 1932 3 1 w cmvkcvv Bernard O. Reuwr,

Patented July 31, 1934 DRINKING TUMBLER l Bernard 0. Reuther, Buffalo, N. Y., assignor to Minnie F. Steele and Edna S. Reuther, Buialo,

Application December 8, 1932, Serial No. '646,345

6 Claims.

This invention relates to a drinking tumbler and more particularly to a drinking tumbler pro- 'vided with double walls, the space between the v inner and outer walls having the air exhausted therefrom to a greater or lesser degree thusforming a rareiied gas between the double walls, to prevent the deposit or precipitation of condensed moisture on the exterior of the tumbler.

. The ordinary conventional drinking tumbler is formed with a single wall and in the ordinary course of usage is partially filled with an iced liquid, or liquid having a temperature that is sub-v stantially below the temperature of the surrounding atmosphere. The reduced temperaturev of the liquid is readily conducted by the wall of the tumbler and there is a tendency caused by the contact of the exterior side of the chilled tumbler wall with the atmosphere to condense moisf ture from the atmosphere upon the exterior side of the tumbler wall and an accumulation of condensed moisture being formed in suicient quantity the moisture will run down the exterior side of the tumbler wall and onto the tumbler support. 'I'his action is especially noticeable in the warmer seasons when the atmosphere is very humid and the diierence in temperature between the atmosphere and liquid is great, and has made necessary the use of matsor coasters beneath tumblers in order to absorb or catch the condensate and prevent the discoloring of table covers or surfaces. The present invention has for its primary ob ject to provide a drinking tumbler which will prevent the condensation of moisture on its exterior when it contains a liquid having a temperature below that of the surrounding atmosphere and therefore eliminate the necessity of using mats or coasters.

A further object is to provide an improved drinking tumbler having double walls and a rarefied air space between the inner and outer walls.

Still further objects of the invention are to provide a double walled drinking tumbler having a hermetically sealed air space between the inner and outer walls; to provide a double walled drinking tumbler of reinforced construction; to prothe goblet type, the double wall portion thereof being shown in section.

Fig. 2 is a vertical section of a drinking tumbler showing the double wall construction. l

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary vertical section of the goblet shown in Fig. 1 with another form of drinking edge.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary vertical section of the tumblershown in Fig. 2 with another form of drinking edge.

The drinking tumbler indicated generally at 1, in Fig. 1, is formed of glass, china or any other suitable composition and is provided with a base 2, stem portion 3 and bowl portion 4. The bowl portion 4 has the inner wall 5 and outer wall 6 which are united at the top in a continuous rolled drinking edge 7. The outer wall 6 may either be an integral continuation of the stem 3 as shown in Fig. 1 or the bowl may. be formed separately from the stem, in which case the outer wall 6 would be cemented or otherwise rigidly attached to the stem substantially at 8.

Space 9 is formed between the walls 5 and 6 and in the process of manufacture, the air is withdrawn to a greater or lesser degree from space 9, thus forming a rareed space between the inner and outer walls. The presence of rarefled space 9 between walls 5 and 6 serves as an extremely efficient non-conductor of heat and will prevent the condensation of moisture on the exterior of wall 6 when the bowl contains a liquid having a lower temperature than the surrounding atmosphere, the wall 5 will remainsubstantially at the temperature of the liquid and wall 6 substantially at the temperature of thel atmosphere.

In another form of the invention, it is recognzed that the air in space 9 need not be withdrawn and that space 9 may be hermetically sealed to prevent any contact of the air in space 9 directly with atmospheric air and that the hermetically sealed air space will be a suiiicient nonconductor of heat to prevent the condensation of moisture on the exterior of wall 6 particularly when the diiference in temperature between the liquid in the bowl and the atmosphere is not great.

In rtumblers in which the walls are extrerely thin, it is desirable to reinforce them byv a web member 6a, formed between the two walls.

supporting base of the tumbler.

In Fig. 2, three reinforcing webs 11, 12 and 13 between the double walls are shown and in this construction separate spacer members can also be used in place-of the integral webs 11, 12 and 13.

Figs. 3 and 4. show tumblers having a dierent form of drinking edge. it is desirable in a high grade tumbler to have thin light materials and especially to have a delicate thin drinking edge.

,In the usual course of filling a tumbler with liquid, it is only filled partially and an appreciable space in the top remains unlled. This customary partial filling renders it possible to move the tumbler or tilt it to ones lips without splashing the liquid over the side. In the tumblers shown in Figs. e and 5 the walls 5 and 6 are joined at 14, which is a point above the usual height ci the level of the liquid contained in a tumbler when the tumbler is in a horizontal position, and an attenuated drinking edge is formed, the inner side of which is beveled to terminate in the narrow lip l5. In this form oi the invention it will be seen that space 9 extends toi a greater height than the level of the liquid and prevents the condensation oi moisture on the exterior of the glass, and that the drinking edge may be oi substantially less thickness than the thickness of the double wall and intervening space.

In another form of the invention, the air confined between the spaced walls of the tumbler is carefully Adried and kept in a substantially dry condition during the manufacture of the tumbler for the purpose of preventing the formation of a mist on the inner surfaces of the spaced walls when the tumbler is later in use and the walls are subjected to varied temperatures.

Although only the preferred forms of the invention have been shown and described in detail, it will nevertheless be apparent to those skilled in the art, that the invention is not so limited but that various changes may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope oi the appended claims.

l claim as my invention:

1. A drinking tumbler comprising double side and double bottom walls forming a rarefied closed gas space between all of the double walls, the upper portion of the walls having a thin integral drinking edge portion of single wall thickness for receiving the lips cfa person drinking from the tumbler.

2..An upright drinking tumbler comprising double side and double bottom walls forming a -rarefied gas space extending to a substantially Leashes ness forming an upper integral portion of the tumbler, the inner portion of the walls constituting the drinking edge being in outwardly beveled form for receiving the lips of a person drinking from the tumbler.

3. An upright glass drinking tumbler comprising an inner wall and an outer wall, said walls extending entirely along the tumbler bottom and sides to a location adjacent the upper edge of the tumbler, said walls defining an air-tight chamber, and a drinking edge portion formed along the upper portion of the tumbler, the thick-- ness of the drinking edge portion being approximately equal to the thickness of one of the walls.

4:. An upright glass drinking tumbler comprislng spaced inner and outer walls, said walls extending along the bottom and sides ci the tumbier and sealed at a location adjacent the upper edge of the tumbler, said walls defining an airtight insulating chamber, and an attenuated drinking edge portion formed along the upper portion of the tumbler beyond the location of sealing oi' the walls, the thickness of the drink'- ing edge portion being approximately equal to the thickness of one of the walls.

5. A non-sweating drinking glass comprising a substantially one-piece glass body having inner and outer glass wall members substantially paralleling each other in nested relation and spaced apart to provide a heat insulating chamber therebetween whereby the outer surface of the glass is prevented from cooling concurrently with the pouring oi a cold liquid'into the inner wall member and thus is precluded from precipitating waters or condensation thereon, such insulating chamber attenuating upwardly toward the mouth of the glass, said body being provided with a selfsustaining base and the insulating chamber being substantially co-extensive with the side and bottom portions of the inner wall member to prevent the cooling of the adjacent portions of the outer wall member to a moisture condensing temperature.

6. A non-sweating drinking glass comprising a unitary glass body having inner and outer wall members hermetlcally sealing a rareed air space therebetween for preventing the chilling of the outer surface of the glass when the inner wall contains a cold liquid whereby waters of condensation are prevented from accumulating on the outer surface of the glass, said glass body having its bottom portion shaped for self-support, said space being substantially co-extensive with the surface area of the inner; wall member, the upper edge portion of the glass body being attenuated to a thin drinking lip and said space terminating short of such drinking lip.

BERNARD O. REUTHER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2493633 *Jun 3, 1946Jan 3, 1950Mart Leon TDouble-walled container
US2637182 *Jan 27, 1950May 5, 1953Howlett Davis GeorgeDouble-walled tumbler
US2660039 *Oct 11, 1948Nov 24, 1953Newell Carl DDrinking glass construction
US2725733 *Jun 30, 1947Dec 6, 1955Detroit Macoid CorpBeverage glass
US2763142 *Aug 9, 1954Sep 18, 1956Neal HepnerVisual display drinking vessel
US4151923 *Mar 5, 1976May 1, 1979Dario BernardiThermally insulated pre-chill drinking glass
US4273245 *Nov 26, 1976Jun 16, 1981Pio Hartinger MachalekInsulated glass vessel
US5580365 *Nov 25, 1994Dec 3, 1996Maiden; Robert P.Method of making a glass diffusion cell
US6571580 *Mar 27, 2000Jun 3, 2003Q.I.S., Inc.Limited volume insert bonding process in a vial
US6913165 *Oct 7, 2002Jul 5, 2005Kerry LinzCocktail shaker
US7437930 *Dec 7, 2004Oct 21, 2008L'orealAssembly comprising a dispensing device and a case which makes it possible to know the degree of emptying of the dispensing device
WO1999044481A1Mar 4, 1999Sep 10, 1999Joseph BinnerTasting and drinking glass
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/12.1, D07/523, 65/58, 65/153, 215/374
International ClassificationA47G19/22
Cooperative ClassificationA47G19/2288
European ClassificationA47G19/22Q