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Publication numberUS1969428 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1934
Filing dateDec 6, 1932
Priority dateDec 6, 1932
Publication numberUS 1969428 A, US 1969428A, US-A-1969428, US1969428 A, US1969428A
InventorsSchwartz Samuel
Original AssigneeSchwartz Samuel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Envelope
US 1969428 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 7, 1934. s. SCHWARTZ 2 ENVELOPE Filed Dec. 6, 1932 OHM M.

Patented Aug. 7, I934 UNITED STA TE-S ATENT j Fl CE 3 Claims.

This invention relates to an envelope having a hole through it whereby it may be hung on a suitable object. The specific purpose of the invention is to provide such a device so constructed that the portion of the envelope containing a document may be completely sealed to retain such document in place, with its message effectively hidden from view, and in which the attaching opening through the envelope is of suchshape that when the envelope is passed over the neck of a milk bottle of appropriate size the envelope will be retained against dislodgment by wind. Thus my envelope is especially-adapted for the delivery of a bill with the bottle of milk.

.Theattaching hole through the envelope is made adjacent one end and is of an elliptical form, preferably with the major axis transverse of the envelope. The size of the opening is such with reference to a standard milk bottle that by bending the paper of the envelope the hole, which is thus caused to assume in effect a circular form,

may be passed over the bead at the top ofthe bottle neck, and will therafter hug the neck below the bead, thereby effectively anchoring the envelope to the bottle, preventing its being lost or blown away.

The compartment of the envelope which may receive the milk bill is closed from the anchoring hole by a transverse glued region which eifectively separates the envelope into two compartments, of which the major one may be designated as the message compartment, and the minor one the attaching compartment. The glued flap of the envelope serves to seal the message within its compartment, and may reinforce the attaching compartment. The message compartment is pref erably of the outlook form, having either an opening or a transparent portion at the front.

When such an envelope as described is used for the delivery of the milk bill, the bill is placed in the message compartment, is folded so that only the address shows through the outlook window. The flap is then sealed so that the bill is effectively and secretly retained within the compartment. Then by bending the attaching portion of the envelope so that the opening assumes an approximately circular form, such end of the envelope is effectively passed over the bead of the bottle and the envelope thus becomes anchored to the bottle.

My invention is illustrated in .the drawing hereof and is hereinafter more fully explained, and the essential novel features are summarized in the claims.

In the drawing, Fig. 1 is a perspective of my envelope place on a milk bottle; Fig. 2 is a plan of the envelope in unattached form; Fig. 3 is an enlarged longitudinal section of the envelope taken on the plane indicated by the offset line ,33. on Fig. 2 and indicatinga suitable document, (for clearness,a-card of single thickness) within the envelope; Fig. 4 is a plan of the blank for the envelope before the same is folded; Fig. 5 is a view of an envelope openable at the end and embodying my invention.

As shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the entire envelope A is divided into two compartments B and C by a transverse region B, caused by gluing the face a of the envelope to the back a thereof. The compartment 3 is the anchoring compartment and contains the opening b, which, as shown, is of elliptical character with the major axis transverse of the envelope. This opening extends through both the front of the envelope and the back thereof, the back portion, asshown bythe blank in Fig. 4, being made partly by the main back flap a and partly by the end flap a2,which overlap each other and are glued together.

The message compartment C preferably has the outlook opening 0, which may have a strip of glassine or other transparent material extending across the opening and secured on the inside of the envelope front, as indicated in Fig. 4.

If a blank of the form shown in Fig. 4 has glue on the region D and also at the edges of the flap a, as shown at a then when folded the two end flaps a and a are first turned in and the side flap a folded over them and glued to the end flaps by the glued portions a and both the side flap (2' and the end flap 0 are glued to the envelope front a by the glued region D. This produces the envelope of the form shown in Fig. 2. Now after the bill E or other message is inserted in the message compartment C, the closing flap a of the envelope is folded over and glued down to the side flap a and to the two end flaps a and a by the ordinary glued region a which the user moistens for the purpose.

It will be seen that when the bill or other mat,- ter is placed in the message compartment with the address opposite the outlook window and the flap a sealed closed, the bill is efiectively enclosedand its data hidden from view. Also, the opening of the anchoring compartment, which extends through the front and portions of the side flat and one end flap, is further reinforced by the glued down main flap a Accordingly, this attaching region iswell reinforced and in use may be readily passed over the bead f of a milk bottle F, as shown in Fig. 1, without danger of tearing the envelope.

The minor axis of the elliptical opening is less than the diameter of the bottle neck, while the major axis is greater than the diameter of the bottle neck. It results from this that when the envelope is in place there is necessarily a pulling of the material longitudinally of the envelope to Warp the surface of the envelope and make the opening through such warped surface in effect substantially circular. Thus, when in place, the envelope closely hugs the neck of the bottle and its tendency to resume a flat form maintains a snug engagement with the neck. Accordingly, while the envelope may be easily slipped into place on the bottle neckover the bead of the bottle, it effectively holds its position and cannot blow away or become lost.

In Fig. 5 I have illustrated my invention as applied to an open end envelope E. This envelope is formed by folding the material from which it is to be made back on itself as ate then folding the opposite side e into an overlapping position relative to the side 6 and securing these sides together with a suitable adhesive to form one face e of the envelope. Both ends of the envelope E are provided with flaps e and c respectively, the flap 6 being folded over overlapping and secured to the sides 6 and e The flap e is provided with dry adhesive e so that it may be folded over and sealed after the bill or other matter has been inserted in the envelope.

In envelopes of the type shownin Fig. 5-, the adhesive at the transverse region which divides the envelope into two compartments serves an important purpose. When the invoice or other matter is inserted in the envelope through the open end 2 it is pr vented from obstructing the elliptical opening b by the region D which in this instance is interposed between the open side of the envelope and the elliptical opening.

It will be seen that I have provided a simple means for effectively attaching a milk bill to a milk bottle without disclosing the data on the bill. Postage and other expense of mailing is avoided, and'the bill is automatically brought to the attention of the recipient of the goods. My

envelope may be cheaply constructed, and ex perience has demonstrated that it is very satisfactory in use.

portion is secured to the last mentioned flap and the main flap to form two compartments within said pocket, one of said compartments having said transversely. elongated opening clear through it and the other compartment having a longitudinally elongated sight opening through its front.

2. An envelope comprising a substantially rectangular front portion, flaps adapted to form the back of said envelope, an additional openable flap providing access to the interior of. said envelope,

.said front portion and at least, one of said flaps having elongated openings therethrough registering with each other, there being a region adjacent the openings where the front portion is secured to the back portion to form two compartments within said envelope, one of said compartments having therethrough said aforementioned elongated openings, and the other compartment having a longitudinally elongated sight opening through its front.

3. An envelope comprising a substantially rectangular front portion, flaps adapted to formthe back of said envelope, an additional openable flap providing access to the interior of said envelope, said front portion and at least one of said flaps having elongated openings therethrough regis- 115 tering with each other, there being a region ad.- jacent the openings where the front portion isse cured to the back portion to form two compart ments' Within said envelope, one of said compartments having therethrough said aforementioned elongated openings.

SAMUEL SCI-IVI'ARTZ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2673680 *Apr 4, 1950Mar 30, 1954Abraham DeutschmeisterTwo-way mailing device
US3482765 *Mar 22, 1968Dec 9, 1969Postal Church Service IncContribution envelope
US4197984 *Oct 23, 1978Apr 15, 1980Dittler Brothers, Inc.Composite envelope
US4460119 *Aug 9, 1982Jul 17, 1984Goodfellow Anthony E BDoor hanging envelope
US4462538 *May 18, 1983Jul 31, 1984Westvaco CorporationDoor hanger envelope
US4545521 *Jun 8, 1984Oct 8, 1985Tension Envelope CorporationEnvelope with hanger
US5713472 *Jun 4, 1996Feb 3, 1998F. M. Howell & CompanyFolding carton with a reinforced hang tab
US5826356 *Nov 14, 1996Oct 27, 1998Lapp; James F.Retail promotion display and coupon system for food and beverage containers
US6024221 *Mar 23, 1998Feb 15, 2000Kabushiki Kaisha Yuyama SeisakushoAmpule storage bag
US6799390Feb 26, 2001Oct 5, 2004Linda BradleyGreetings device having loop for securement to a bottle
US8534535 *Nov 10, 2009Sep 17, 2013Victor Envelope Manufacturing CorporationEnvelope with sealed display rack hole
US20110108612 *Nov 10, 2009May 12, 2011Victor Envelope Manufacturing CorporationEnvelope with sealed display rack hole
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/74, 206/831, 229/71, 206/806
International ClassificationB65D27/00, B65D23/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D23/14, Y10S206/806, Y10S206/831, B65D27/00
European ClassificationB65D23/14, B65D27/00