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Publication numberUS1973226 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 11, 1934
Filing dateJul 5, 1932
Priority dateJul 5, 1932
Publication numberUS 1973226 A, US 1973226A, US-A-1973226, US1973226 A, US1973226A
InventorsRose Clarence W, Rose Walter E
Original AssigneeRose Clarence W, Rose Walter E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Antislipping shoe for ladders
US 1973226 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 11, 1934. c, w ROSE ET A 1,973,226

ANTISLIPPING SHOE FOR LADDERS Filed July 5. 1952 INVENTORS.

I 51 0710 6%WM9A 5.3, BY 9! J ATTORNEYS Yatentedt Sept. 11, 1934 f was;

ll,9i3,226

AN'rrsLmrrNa shoe roa LADDERS Clarence W. Rose and Walter E. Rose,

Denver, Colo.

Application Italy 5, 1932, Serial No. 620,878 I 12 @laims.

This invention relates to anti-slipping shoes for ladders, its principal object being to provide a shoe of this character, adapted to support a ladder to which it is applied, against slipping under difierent conditions and upon difierent surfaces.

Another object of the invention is to provide means to adjustably connect the shoe to the ladder, and so that it is in operative relation to the ladder in each of its adjusted positions.

A further object resides in providing in association with the shoe, a novel element to frictionally engage a surface on which the ladder is supported, and still other objects reside in details of construction and in novel and advantageous combinations and arrangements of parts as will be fully explained in the course of the following description.

In the accompanying drawing, in the several views of which like parts are similarly designated,

Figure 1 represents a perspective view of the lower portion of a ladder to which the anti-slipping shoes of the present invention are applied,

Figure 2 is a sectional view of the shoe, in connection with the ladder, drawn to an enlarged scale,

Figure 3 is a side elevation of the shoe on the ladder, in an adjusted position,

Figure 4 is a top view of the body of the shoe,

Figure 5 is a section along the line 5-5 of Figure 4,

Figure 6 is an elevation drawn to a reduced scale, showing a modification in which the shoe is equipped with a relatively adjustable foot,

Figure 7 is a view similar to Figure 6, showing the foot in an adjusted position,

Figure 8 is a section on the line 8-8 of Figure 2,

Figure 9 is a sectional view similar to that of Figure 2, showing another modification of the shoe, and

Figure 10 is a fragmentary section on the line 1010 of Figure 9.

Referring further to the drawing, the anti-slipping shoe comprises a body 5 of U-shaped section, the parallel sides 6 of which are provided with slots '7. The bottom 8 of the body has a downwardly projecting lip 9 and an aperture 10 for the attachment of the tread of the shoe.

This tread consists of a pad 12 of resilient material into which is embedded a metal plate 13, an end of which projects outside the pad to provide a tongue 14 which, in practice, is inserted in a socket of the body provided by the offset lip 9.

The lip and the tongue have registering apertures 15 and 16 for the application of a bolt.

The pad is preferablymade of rubber and it has a plurality of spaced, transverse toes 18 of cord-matter, that in practice engage the surface upon which the ladder to which the shoe is applied, is supported.

The tread placed against the under-surface of the body-member of the shoe, with its tongue inside the socket provided by the offset lip, is secured in place by screw-bolts 1'7 and 19 inserted through the aperture 10 of the body and a therewith registering hole 20 in the tread, and through the alined apertures 15 and 16.

It is possible to compose the surface of the tread opposite to that having the cord-toes, of a difierent friction material, as for example, carborundum, so that in a reversed position of the tread, the carborundum may engage a surface upon which a ladder to which the shoe is applied, is supported. This has been illustrated in Figure 9 of the drawing in which the numeral 21 indicates the carborundum surface of the tread. By providing two tread-surfaces of different materials, the shoe is adapted for frictional engagement with different surfaces, or with surfaces in either a dry or wet condition.

The shoes, in practice, embrace the lower ends of the side rails 24 of a ladder, the rails being recessed at opposite sides, as at 22, to receive the sides 5 of the body of the shoe. The ends 23 of the side rails are rounded to movably engage the bottom-plates of the shoe-bodies, and bolts 25 extending through the slots '7 of the sides 5 and through therewith registering holes in the ladder-rails provide for the pivotal connection of the shoes with the ladder.

The slots permit the ends of the side-rails to frictionally engage the shoes, when the ladder is in use, and they furthermore allow adjustment of the shoes to a position alongside the edges of the rails, as illustrated in Figure 3 of the drawing, in which position the bolts on the ladder ends are supported on the lower sides of the slots in the sides of the shoes.

The body of the shoe shown in Figures 1 to 5, has at one end of its bottom plate, a sharpedged extension which provides a prong 26 to engage a surface upon which the ladder is supported, when the shoes are in the adjusted positions, shown in Figure 3. The prongs provide a firm support for the ladder on sandy, clayey or other penetratable surfaces. The prong may be corrugated as shown in Figure 10 to strengthen its construction.

In the modified form of the invention, illustrated inFigures 6 and 7, the shoe has at an end of its body, a foot 27 pivotally mounted, as at 28, for adjustment to different positions relative to the shoe. The foot has a surface 29 of suitable friction-material, such as carborundum. and it has at an end of said surface a prong 30 similar to that of the first described construction.

The foot functions when the respective shoe is in its adjusted position along an edge of the ladder-rail. In the position illustrated in Figure 7, its carborundum face engages the surface on which the ladder is supported, and in another position, shown in Figure 6, its prong engages the surface.

The parts 6 of the shoes, fitting in the recesses in the sides of the ladder rails, are flush with said sides, so as not to interfere with nesting of sectional ladders. Moreover, the recesses provide shoulders 31 which aid in supporting the ladder on the shoes when the latter are in their adjusted positions along edges of the ladder rails, as shown in Figures 3, 6 and '7. The holes in the ladder rails through-which the bolts extend may be lined with metal bushing 32, as best shown in Figure 8.

What we claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A ladder having side-rails, recessed at their opposite sides, and apertured for the reception of bolts, anti-slipping shoes having apertured sides fitted in said recesses, flush with the sides of the side-rails and bolts in the apertures of the shoes and the side-rails, an edge of the recess providing a shoulder on which the shoes abut.

2. A ladder having side-rails, recessed at their opposite sides, and apertured for the reception of bolts, anti-slipping shoes having apertured sides fitted in said recesses, flush with the sides of the side-rails and bolts in the apertures of the shoes and the side-rails for their pivotal connection, the recesses being shouldered to provide abutments for the ladder on the shoes in an adjusted position of the shoes relative to the side-rails of the ladder.

3. An anti-slipping shoe for ladders comprising a body adapted for connection at an end of a side-rail of a ladder, and having a bottomplate provided with an aperture and with a socket-forming lip, a tread having an aperture registering with that of the bottom-plate and having a tongue insertable in the socket of the lip, and a bolt in the apertures of the bottom plate and the tread.

4. An anti-slipping shoe for ladders comprising a body adapted for connection at an end of a side-rail of a ladder, and having a bottomplate provided with an aperture and with a. socket-forming apertured lip, a tread having an aperture registering with that of the bottomplate and having an apertured tongue insertable in the socket of the lip, and bolts in the apertures of the bottom-plate and the tread and in the apertures of the lip and the tongue.

5. An anti-slipping shoe for ladders comprising a body adapted for connection at an end of a side-rail of a ladder, and having a bottomplate provided with an aperture and with a socket-forming lip, a tread composed of a resilient pad and an embedded plate projecting beyond the pad to form a tongue insertable in the socket 0f the lip, the tread having an aperture registering with that of the bottom-plate, and bolts in the apertures of the bottom-plate and the tread.

6. An anti-slipping shoe for ladders, comprising a body adapted for connection at an end of a side-rail of a ladder, a friction-tread on the body, and an adjustable foot pivoted at an end of the body and having another friction tread to engage a surface on which the ladder is supported.

7. An anti-slipping shoe for ladders, comprising a body adapted for connection at an end of a side-rail of a ladder, a friction-tread on the body, and an adjustable foot pivoted at an end of the body and having another friction tread, and a prong to separately engage a surface on which the ladder is supported, after pivotal adjustment of said foot.

8. An anti-slipping shoe for ladders, comprising a body adapted for connection at an end of a side-rail of a ladder, a friction-tread on the body, and a pivoted foot at an end of the body, having another friction tread to engage a sur-- face on which the ladder is supported.

9. An anti-slipping shoe for ladders comprising a body adapted for connection at an end of a side-rail of a ladder, and a corrugated prong on said body to engage a surface on which the ladder is supported.

10. An anti-slipping shoe for ladders, comprising a body adapted for connection at an end of a side-rail of a ladder, a friction-tread on the body, and a pivoted foot at an end of the body, having another friction tread of different composition, to engage a surface on which the ladder is supported.

11. A ladder apertured at the ends of its siderails, anti-slipping shoes straddling the rails and having sides of metal or the like and having treads to engage the surface of the ground in one position and an end to engage the ground in another position, and having slots in their sides transverse to the longitudinal extent of their treads for the support of the shoe in the lastmentioned position.

12. An anti-slipping shoe for ladders comprising a body adapted for connection at an end of a side-rail of a ladder and having a bottom plate, and a rubber friction tread on said bottom plate, corrugated to provide a plurality of toes for engagement with the surface on which the ladder is supported, having inserts of cord or the like, the ends of which form part of the ends of the toes, whereby the rubber part of the toes and the inserts will engage said surface.

CLARENCE W. ROSE. WALTER. E. ROSE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification182/109, 248/188.9
International ClassificationE06C7/46, E06C7/00
Cooperative ClassificationE06C7/46
European ClassificationE06C7/46