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Publication numberUS1973539 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 11, 1934
Filing dateSep 15, 1930
Priority dateSep 15, 1930
Publication numberUS 1973539 A, US 1973539A, US-A-1973539, US1973539 A, US1973539A
InventorsKrum Howard L, Sterling Morton
Original AssigneeTeletype Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
System for displaying intelligence and controlling apparatus therefor
US 1973539 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 11, 1934.

SYSTEM FOR DISPLAYING INTELLIGENCE AND CONTROLLING APPARATUS THEREFOR Ln oooocooooo Q 000 O OO rL l

0 D00 0 O O TELETELL' mmmmmmmu S. MORTON ET AL Filed Sept. 15, 1930 7 Sheets-Sheet l a] [Hu INVENTOR5 Sis? Howard, .lfnuflt/ Sept. 11, 1934. s. MORTON ET AL 1,973,539

SYSTEM FOR DISPLAYING INTELLIGENCE AND CONTROLLING APPARATUS THEREFOR Filed Sept. 15, 1930 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 HTTQE/VEY.

Sept. 11, 1934. s. MORTON EI'AL SYSTEM FOR DISPLAYI NG INTELLIGENCE AND CONTROLLING APPARATUS THEREFOR Filed Sept. 15, 1930 '7 Sheets-Sheet 3 Sept. 11, 1934. s. MORTON ET AL 1,973,539

SYSTEM FOR DISPLAYING INTELLIGENCE AND CONTROLLING APPARATUS THEREFOR Filed Sept. 15, 1930 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS Siendflyl/ofiz BY Howard! [Cm/7L w M w A TORNEY5 Sept. 11, 1934. s. MORTON ET AL SYSTEM FOR DISPLAYING INTELLIGENCE AND CONTROLLING APPARATUS THEREFOR 1930 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Sept. 15

oooooooooc'woo OOOOOOOOOUOOO COOOOOOO OOO OOOOOOOOOO INVENTORS Sier Jifor H0 Sept. 11, 1934. s. MORTON Er AL SYSTEM FOR DISPLAYING INTELLIGENCE AND CONTROLLING APPARATUS THEREFOR 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 a m 1 av 1 H I v INVENTORS 5terjz'n g /7[07 267z/ How'axflL. 76427 0 'IIIHII'IIIIII ill In llllll llllll IIIIIMIIII IIIH lill a Patented Se t. 11, 1934 PATENT OFFICE SYSTEM FOR DISPLAYING INTEILIGENCE AND CONTROLLING APPARATUS THERE- FOR Sterling Morton, Chicago, and Howard L. Kenilworth, Ill., assignors to Teletype Corporation; Chicago, 111., a corporation of Delaware Application September 15, 1930, Serial No. 481,895

21 Claims. (Cl. 1185-24) The present invention relates to a system of displaying intelligence through the medium .of a moving or changeable sign and provides an improved display system whereby the intelligence 5 displayed can be continuously changed, thereby avoiding the repetition inherent in changeable signs heretofore used. The improvement also provides an improved means and apparatus for displaying intelligence which can be located at lO'a number-f diflferent stations and controlled telegraphically from a central station, for the purpose of broadcasting current news or the like.

The invention also provides an improved impression mechanism or'sign controlling apparal tus having a series of selectable character members and means controlled thereby for forming and eilfecting the impression upon the tape or the like, of directly legible characters.

with these and other objects in view, the in- 20 vention consists in the features of improvement hereinafter more fully set forth in detail,- illustrated in the preferred forms in the accompanying drawings and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

25 In the drawings: 1

Fig. 1 is a front elevation with parts broken away, of an illuminated sign such as'may form a part of the present improved display system,

together with a diagrammatic view of the impression device or perforator for forming a flexible sign controlling means such as a tape.

Fig. 2 is a plan view partially broken away, of parts shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a diagram of the controlling circuit forming a part of the improved system.

- Fig. 4 is a plan view of the selecting and impression apparatus for controlling the sign I and display system.

Fig. 5 is an elevation of the selector mechanism with the parts shown in section on the line 5-5 of P g. 4. a

6 is a horizontal section on the line 66 of Fig. 5. a w

'Tis a detail plan view of the parts shown i ie. 5 mis of Fig. '1.

Fig.9isanenlargeddetai1planview shown in Fig. 4.

10 is a front end elevation of the apparatus shown in Fig. 4, with partsbroken away and i shown insection.

Figs. llamd 12 are detailviews of the trans- 55 lating character members or plates, Fig. 11

61 are ing the printing of characters on the tape rather a vertical section on'the line 8-8" showing one of the plates in normal position and Fig. 12 in shifted position.

Fig. 13 is an enlarged detail view of the impression members or elements shown in Fig. 4, and which are in the form of tape punches- Figs. 14 and 15 are detail plan section and elevation respectively, of means for controlling and efiecting the operation of the punching apparatus.

Fig. 16 is a view similar to Fig. 14, but showing the parts in shifted position. 7

Figs. 17 and 18 are detail views of parts of the punch controlling selector mechanism.

Fig. 19 is a diagrammatic view illustrating parts for controlling the operation of a moving display sign by the medium of a perforated tape which is produced telegraphically during the operation of the sign. I

Fig. 20 is an elevation of the receiving station of the system shown in Fig. .19,.with the contact tank partly in section.

Fig. 21 is an enlarged plan view of a portion of the contact tank.

Fig: 22 is a transverse section of the contact tank and also shows the connections between thesameandthelampsofthesign.

Fig. 23 is a detail of a mounting of the lamps in the sign.

Fig. 24 is a perspective view illustrating a tape-actuated switch for controlling the stopping ofthe tape.

Figs. 25 and 26 are detail views illustrating the tape stop mechanism.

Fig. 27 is a detail view of the tape hold-down member employed in the contact tank.

Fig. 28 is a circuit diagram of the tape'start and stop mechanism.

Fig. 29 is a view corresponding to a portion of Fig. 4, but illustrating a modification for effectthan perforating the same.

Fig. 30 isadetailofthepartsshowninfig.

Fig. 31 is a partial plan view of the impression apparatus, illustrating another modification. 1 6

Fig. 32 is a detail view of parts shown in Fig.

Fig. 33 shows a section of the tape with the characters produced thereon by the imprunion In the small'direct reading.sign shown in Figs.1 and2,atranslucentglsss2is inaframe 1 atthefrontofthesignandatape 3isfedbehindtheglas2andginfrontofa row of incandescent lamps 4. In the fun o '(0 fixed to a lever 25 which is pivoted at 45. The

shown, a smallmotor 6, through the medium of a belt 7, drives pulley 8, the roller 'shaft 9 of 1 to illustrate the formation of several of the characters. Y

The impression or punching mechanism, which is hereinafter more clearly set forth, is provided with'tape feeding rolls 12 and 13, and in the form shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the tape extends therefrom directly into one end of the sign and around an idler roller 15 at its opposite end and then to tape driving rolls 9 and 10.

The punching'mechanism is preferably controlled by a selector mechanism. which is responsive to code signals comprising permutations 'of two different electrical conditions extending through a definite number of time intervals or units. Such signals may be transmitted over a line conductor 16 (see Fig. 3) from a keyboard sender, such for example as illustrated in the U. S. Letters Patent No, 1,595,472 of Howard L. Krum, dated August 10, 1926. Preferably a start-stop telegraph system is employed and the selecting units of the permutation or Baudot code are each preceded by a starting unit or interval and followed by a stopping unit or pulse which may be of indefinite duration.

The impressionmechanism is preferably controlled by a selector mechanism such as' described and claimed in U. S. Letters Patent No. 1,745,633, dated February 4, 1930, except that instead of .five selectors, the present selector mechanism is provided with six in correspondence with the number of selecting units of the signal code.

The six selectors are in the form of thin, fiat fingers30 (see Figs. 5 and 6) arranged one above the other between guide plates 31. The latter are mounted on studs 32 rising from a frame plate 32 and are spaced by washers 33. The

circular rear ends of the selector fingers engage similarly shaped sockets. in a set of six bell-cranks 34 pivotally mounted on a stud 35. Individual springs 36 hold the bell-cranks and selector fingers in normal position with the pointed rear ends of' the bell-crank arms adjacent a cam barrel 37 on-the upper end of a shaft 38. The latter is continuously driven when the apparatus is in operation, from a motor 39 through the medium of intermeshing gears 39 (see Fig. 10).

The cam barrel 37 is provided with a spirally arranged series of cam fingers 41 which suc-' cessively oscillate" the bell-cranks 34 and longitudinally reciprocatethe selecting fingers as the cam barrel is rotated. -The .selecting fingers 30 in addition to their longitudinal movement, are

arranged-to swing laterallybetween a pair of stop pins 40, and. the setting of the selectors either in right or left-hand position is controlled by an.electromagnet '18 which responds to the received signals. The magnet armature 44 is "selector fingfl' 80.

As set forth the prior Patent No. 1,745,633 referred to, the selector fingers 30 act through a series of Ii-shaped levers 50 to position a second set of selecting members or notched permutation bars 51. The T-levers are arrangedbetween the plates 31 and mounted on a pivot stud 52. The permutation bars are mounted upon and have pin and slot connections with a fixed support.

The springs 36 normally hold the bell-cranks 34, as shown in Fig. 6, with the selecting fingers in their forward positions in engagement with the T-levers, so that the permutation bars 51 are each held in one or the other of two positions according as the corresponding selecting finger is in its right or' left-hand position.

The abutments 46 on the ends of the armature lever are closer together than the abutments 47 on the ends of the, selectors, so that, as the armature lever is vibrated in response to the electrical conditions of the received signals, the parts 46 alternately move into and out of alignment with the ends of the arms 47 and cooperate therewith, as the fingers are reciprocated by the rotary cam barrel, to determine the setting of the selectors each either in its right or left-hand position. When thus set in a combination corresponding to any signal. received, the selectors are pressed forwardly by the springs 36 against the T-levers 50 and the setting of the selector fingers is transferred to the permutation members if and when the latter are unlocked. The permutation members are locked during the selecting operations effected thereby, but, as stated, the setting of the selecting fingers is transferred thereto as soon as the permutation bars are released. This arrangement permits. a selecting operation of the permutation members during the setting of the selecting fingers in response to the succeeding code signal.

The cam barrel 37 is driven from the shaft 38 of the shaft and the other to a sleeve keyed thereto. The cam barrel is provided on its ends with disks 62 andfriction washers 63 are interposed between these disks and the adjacent metal disks and 61. Pressure is applied to the friction washers by a spring64 extending between a sleeve 65 fixed to the shaftand the disk 61.

The'friction clutch tends to rotate the cam barrel in clockwise direction, but normally it is arrested by the engagement of an arm 66 thereon with a lug 67 on the lower arm of a U-shaped stop gate 68. The latter is pivoted on a stud 69 depending from-a plate 76 and its upper arm is engaged by a latch 70 pivoted at 74 to a lug 75 on the plate 76. The plate 76 is rotatable about a pivot stud 77 in line with the axis of the shaft 38, and is adapted to be clamped in adjusted-position against a fixed plate 78.

Theouter end of the latch 70 is held in its operative depressed position by a spring 83 and it is shifted to release the stop gate and permit the rotation of the spring barrel by a bell-crank 84 pivoted on a small fixed bracket 85. The latter is shifted by a small plunger 86 which is operated in'turn by the eccentric head 88 of a stud fixed to the armature lever 25.

Preferably. the receiver magnet 18 is normally energized and holds the armature in the position shown in Fig. 6 against the tension of its .spring 26; In response to the uniform start pulse of each signal, the magnet '18 is deenergized and its armature shifted by its spring to thereby trinthe latch 70 and release the stop .gate 68 and permit the rotation ofthe cam member as described. During this rotation the selecting fingers are set in a combination corresponding to the units or intervals of the signal and when the permutation bars are released, the setting of the fingers is transferred thereto. At the end of each signal and during the stop or spacing interval, the arm 66 on the cam barrel engages the lug 67 on the stop gate and, as the latter is held at this time in position by the latch 70, the rotation of the cam barrel is arrested until again released in response to the starting pulse or interval of the succeeding sigbar 175. Normallythe actuating bar 96 is in its lowermost position, as shown in Fig. 17, and its forward edge cooperates with inclines on the rear edges of the bars 95 to hold them in their forward position out of engagement with the notched forward edges of the permutation bars. The universal actuating bar 96 also normally holds a locking bar 90, pivoted at itslower end,

' out of engagement with beveled teeth, one of which is formed on each of the permutation bars. The universal bar, 96 is carried on the plunger 141 that is vertically guided in the ma-, chine frame and is operated from a cam 97 on the vertical shaft 38 through the medium of a bell-crank lever 135 mounted on the fixed pivot 136 (see Fig. 18). The lower arm 137 of the bell-crank engages a notch in the plunger 141 (see Fig. .10) and a spring 138 (see Fig. 18) connects this arm toa fixed pin 139. The cam 97 cooperates with a roller 127 on the bell-crank and normally the high part of the cam engages the roller and holds the universal operating bar 96 in its lowermost position.

The cam 97 is carried on a sleeve 112 which is loose on the shaft 38, but is adapted to be connected thereto by crown tooth clutch members .113 and 114. The latter is fixed to the shaft (see Fig. 15) and the driven cam member 113 is spllned to the sleeve 11: and is pressed toward the other clutch member by a spring 116. A bail 118 mounted upon a vertical pivot shaft 121 (see Figs. 6, 14, 15 and 16) is held in normal position by a spring 122 and is provided at its upper end withanarm123arrangedtobeengs8 dbya tooth 124 on the cam barrel37. The arm on the lower end of the bail is provided with an ing bar are drawn into engagement with the permutation bars 51 and one of the actuating bars, corresponding to the setting of the permutation bars, drops into the aligned notches of the permutation bars so that the actuating bar 96 engages a lug thereon and effects the vertical movement of the selected actuating bar. Upon 113 and 114.

in outline to the corresponding characthe complete rotation of the cam' 97, operating bar 96 is lowered to restore the locking bar 90 and the actuating bars 95, and the lug 125 on the trip member 118 disengages the clutch mem- The selection and operation of the actuating bars95 control the setting of a plurality of character members or translating plates 162. The latter are mounted to slide in their own planes in a frame formed by a carriage designated as a whole by the numeral 155 (see Fig. 4). This carriage comprises transverse members 156 con nested by longitudinal members 157 and is provided with rollers 158 which engage fixed tracks or rails 159. The character members or translation plates 162 are arranged to slide, as stated, each in its own plane in slots formed in longitudinal bars 157 of the carriage.

A plurality of the impression members or punches 165 are arranged in horizontal and vertical rows in an impression field and mounted to slide horizontally to a limited extent in fixed guide plates 166, so that they'will cooperate with a punch platelfi'l to perforate the tape 3. The punches are forced forwardly through the tape by a. series of actuating bars 168 and are withdrawn by a stripper plate 169, which is fixed to the forward end of the reciprocating carriage andis arranged to engage heads 170 on the inner ends of the impression elements or punches 165. The punch operating bars 168 correspond in number and arrangement with the impression elements or punches 165 and their forward ends are contracted to align with the punches, wheres the-main body of the operating bars are spread somewhat i'artherapart, as most clearly in Fig. 13. These operating bars slide through fixed guide plates 171 and extend through openings in the character members or translating plates 162. Each plate is provided with a cam slot 180, (see Figs. 11 and 12) which engage a stud 179 on the lowerend of the corresponding actuating bar 95. Normally the parts are in the position shown in Fig. 11, but

when the character or translating plate is selected, the corresponding actuating bar 95 is lifted and the plate. shifted from its left-hand position shown in Fig. 11, to its right-hand position as shown in Fig. 12. Also, the holes 181 and 182 through which the punch operating bars 168 extend are relatively large and small and as indicated in Figs. 11 and 12, the outline of the small holes in any one plate corresponds to the character represented thereby, the small holes in these'ngures representing the letter E. Also, each punchoperating bar 168 is provided with teeth 183 adjacent the several plates and when any character plate is shifted to its right hand position, the edges of the small holes will engage teeth on a group of punch actuating bars ter, and when the carriage and plates carried thereby are advanced, perforations outlining the character are formed in the tape.

The carriage is shifted by a cam 131 (see Figs. 4 and 9) formed on the sleeve 112 and having a crown groove therein which engages a pin or roller 132 on the end of an arm 185.

The latter is mounted on the upper end of a vertical rock shaft 184 and an arm 186 on the lowerendofthisshaftisconnectedbya link 187 to the rear end of the reciprocating car- The mechanism for feeding the tape comprises gears 191 and 192 connecting the lower end of 150 the shaft 38 with a-hoiizontal shaft 193 (see Figs. 4 and The latter'is iom'naled in suitable bearings in the base plate 193* and is connected at its forward end by gears 194 and 195 to a transverse shaft 196. Tight and loose clutch members 201 and 202 are adapted to couplc the shaft 196 and a gear 203 that is loose thereon and a spring 205 tends to engage the clutch members; The gear 203 and the clutch member 202 are splined together and the latter is normally held in its disengaged position by a trip arm 213 which cooperates with a crown cam 206 on the clutch member. The trip arm is mounted on a rock shaft 211 that is journaled in brackets 212 on the base plate 193 A depending arm-214 (see Fig. 10) on therock shaft is connected by a link 215 (see Fig. 4) with an arm 223 on the lower end of a vertical rock shaft 221. A-spring 216 connected to the link 215 holds the trip arm 213 in normaljposition and an arm 222 on the upper end of the vertical rock shaft 221 is adapted to be engaged at the proper time by a tooth 224 on the cam sleeve 112 to shift the trip arm 213 and efiect the engagement of the clutch and a single revolution of the gear 203. The latter meshes with a gear 228 on the lower end of a vertical tape feed roller 13 which cooperates with a pressure :roller 12 to advance the tape. -A manually operable cam 229 is provided for moving the roller 12, which is spring-pressed toward the roller 13 to permit the insertion of the leading end of the tape between the. rollers...

When the selector mechanism has positioned the permutation bars 51 in accordance with a received signal, the clutch 111 comprising the members 113 and 114, is engaged as described to effect a single revolution of the cam sleeve 112. -Cain 97 then cooperates with the spring 138 to. shift the universal bar 96 and thereby through the medium of one of the guiding .or

operating bars shift the corresponding character or translation plate 162 from its inoperative position to its active position in engagement withthe teeth of a corresponding group of operating hand. Then cam 131 effects the-forward movement of the carriage and all ofthe plates-andthe: selected group of operating bars 168 effects the operation of the corresponding group of impression members or punches 165 to perforate the outline of the character in the tape. During the return movement of the carriage, the operated punches and bars 168 are withdrawn and then the tooth 224 on the cam sleeve 112 trips the tape feed mechanism into operation to bring a fresh portion of the tape into the impression fleld. In their normal return restored position the. punch operating bars 168 are held against any substantial movement between the heads 170 of the punches and a fixed st p plate 188.-- V

= The lower ends of .the actuating bars 95 extend through openings in a guide bar 177 fixed on-the carriage, so that the lower ends of the actuating bars move back and forth with the short to and fro movement ofthe carriage, although the upper ends of the actuating bars extend through slots in=the fixed guide bar 175. This is permitted because the necessary throw of the carriage is quite short and also because of the elasticity of the actuating bars and the loosenessof the mounting at their lower ends.

Since the punch mechanism 5 perforates the tape i'nthe outline of. legible characters, the

its reading in accordance with the variable op-- eration of the punch mechanism, and these rolls are designed to tightly r p the tape, but a slip or friction element is introduced into this feed mechanism since the belt 7 will slip on the small sheave 11 in case the movement of the tape by the rolls 9 and 10 is resisted. Preferably the speed of the motor 6 is so regulated that the feed of the tape through the sign effected by the rollers 9 and 10 is approximately the average or'slightly less than the average speed of the tape through the rollers l2'and 13 which operate intermittently between the successive operations of the punch mechanism, so that the movement of the tape through the sign can be continuous. For some purposes, such, for example, as the display of stock quotations, it is desired that the speed of the tape through the rollers 9 and 10 be less than the average speed through the intermittently operated punch rollis desirable to apply a pressure device to the tape as it enters the sign in order that it be held taut and closely adjacent the glass 2. Also, at times in such cases the supply of tape will be so small that its movement will be arrested, since the grip of the rollers 12 and 13 is suflicient to restrain the tape against the pull of the rollers 9 and 10. However, the tape will not be torn, but instead the small sheave 11 will slip on the belt 7.

With the arrangement shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the size of the sign is, for practical purposes, limited. For a larger display sign, the tape is employed through a multiple contact device 231 (see Fig. 20) to control a large lamp sign 232 (see Figs. 19 and 20). In Fig. 20, a complete receiver and impression device or tape perforator is indicated at 233. The contacting device 231 comprises a mercury tank having a pair of rollers 234 for drawing the tape therethrough.-

The operating motor 39 of the punch mechanism is connected by belts 235 to a pulley 251 on. a

shaft 252, and one of the draw rolls 234 is,

in the bottom of the tank, the rows of contacts,

of course, being adapted to register with the horizontal rows of perforations in the tape. The circuit for each lamp is from battery 245 (see Fig. 20) through, the lamp, thence by its conductor 242 to the corresponding contact 241, through the hole in the tape-to the body of mercury 247 in the tank, and thence to the other amuse battery terminal. Smhcircuitmofcooraemterruptedwhenauunperforatedportionofthe tape covers the contact. The movement of'the drive rollm is fixed to a sleeve 253; which is loose on the shalt. A rriction clutch comprises or plates 254, 255 and 258, between which friction washers 251are interposed. Plate 254 is fixed to the sleeve and plate 255 is splined thereto. The plate 256 is provided with perrotated cars which engage pins 265 on a disk 26* thatisfixecltotheshalt. Espring 260 extends between a collar 253 on the sleeve and the disk.

255 and presses the elements of the friction clutchinto firm contact. The stop magnet 266 is mounted on a support 263 and its armatme 268 is pivoted at 269 and a Spring 2'10 tends to move an oflset stop lug 211 thereon into 110 sition to engage a cooperating stop or abutment. 259 on. the collar 258. A support 275 (see Figs' 20 and 24) carries a controlling switch for the stop magnet comprising a movable contact 276 pivoted on a stud 217 and pressed .towards a fixed contact 219 by means of a. spring 218. An arm or tape follower 289 is fixed to the pivoted contact 217 and an offset on arm extends overthetape 3, asshowninFigs. 2c and 24. The controlling contacts for the magnet are also shown in the diagram, Fig. 28, and as shown in fliisdithecircuitoithemagnetisalso preferably provided witha manually operable 'switchzai. whenthisswitchisclosedandthe receiver and the perforator operate to furnish anamplesupplyoftapethecontactfldwill engegethefixedcontactrl andthemagnet will be -i.- to withdraw the stop lug 271 of its e from engagement with the lug 259 on the sleeve 258. lhen the roll 234 will be by the friction clutch to continuously advance the tape through the contacttankandsoilluminatethelampsasto efiect the movement of the characters through Preferably the switch 281 or the m n 266 is not closed unhl a pendant loop of perforated tape is accmnulated between the perforator 5 and the contact tank. Preferably, also, the speed of the tape through the multiple contact isatelythesameasthespeedoithe tape through-the receiver and periorator, so that thetloopismaintainedbetweenthein? operating receiving and apparatus and the multiple .contactor through whichthetapeiscontinnouslydrawn. How ever, should ofsignals to the receiver he ued, the amount of tape in the loopwill be diminished and, byengas m 'withthefollower'm,thetapewill the contacts 2'26 and 219, de'the stop magnet and eilect the engagement of the stops zfllandmtoarresttherollernlandthe pcsageotthetapethroughthe contactor..'A' s soonastheonot'signalsisagain starteitheaccmnulationoitapeintheloop circuit of the stop magnet'and the the magain start the movement or the sign controlling D Obviously, instead of employing a keyboard transnitter such as indicated in Figs. 1 and 2,

a. tape perforator as indicated in 282 in Fig. 19 could be employed, and the tape 283 formed thereby, used to control the operation of' a. transmitter 284 to effect the transmission of signals to one or more .receiver magnets -18 located at a number of different stations, as indicated in Fig. 19. By discontinuing the operation of the keyboard transmitter 1'7 in the arrangement indicated in Fig. 3, or of the tape perforator 282 indicated in Fig. 19, the transmission of signals and the operation of the punch mechanism and the movement of characters through the sign canbe arrested and, in this way, emphasize any particular word or words, as desired. l

In the particular punch field provided and alsointhe display field (see-Figs. 11, 12 and 19), there are ten rows of punches or impression devices and ten rows of lamps. But-the letters and figures are designed from seven of these rows. Preferably the character members or 1 translation plates of the impression mechanism are so arranged that the upper seven. rows are employed for letters and the lower seven rows for figures, so that an optical effect of two rows of. is produced, as indicated in Fig. 19, and an economy is effected by using the four median rows of punches and lamps for both. letters and figures.

If desired, for daylight display of the intelligence recorded by the impression mechanism, 0 the ends of the impression elements can be formed into printing instead of punching faces. Such a modification is shown in Figs. 29, 30 and 31. As shown in Fig. 29, the punch block is replaced by a fixed platen 300 and the impres-- sion elements 1'75 are provided with printing ends or heads 301 threaded thereto. Preferably the lineal movement of the carriage and the clearance between the impression elements and the operating bars 168 therefor are increased. Also,- there is added an inking arm 302 adapted to be shifted by a spring 303 and pivoted at 394. Normally an abutment 306 on the carriage engages an ofiset 305 on the arm and holds it in the position shown. As the carriage 5 advances, the spring will quickly shift the arm 302 and an inking roller 307 thereon will be drawn over the printing faces. This roller is mounted on an am 308 pivoted at 309 on the end of the am 302 and held in position by a spring 310. At the end of its movement, shown in dotted lines in- Fig. 29, the inking roller 307 es an ink supply roller 311 mounted on a shaft 312 and adapted to be operated from the shaft 196 through the medium of intermeshing gears 313. Upon the return of the carriage, the engagement of the arm 306 with onset 305 will restore the ink roller. Instead of an ink roller. a, ribbon 320 may be provided, as shown in Fig. 31. The ends of this ribbon are wound on spools 321 which are r 1: to be yen inopposite directions by pawls 322 connected to arms 324 on the rock shaft 211 and held in operative position by springs 333. A reciprocating bar 325 is pro- 5 vided with pins 326 for holding one or the other of the pawls 322 out of operation. Pivoted reversing arms 32'! are'provided with pins 328 extending through slots 339 in the bar 325 and also with loops engaging the ribbon. Abutfigures.

ments on the ends of the ribbon engage these arms to reverse the ribbon feed. A jockey 340 engages the reversing bar to hold it in either one of its two positions.

It is noted that the impression mechanism by which legible characters are formed on the tape either by perforating punches or printing heads, has a short throw so that quite large letters can be formed at much greater speed than could be obtained if attempt were made to form characters equally large with ordinary telegraph printers employing ype wheels or type bars.

The form of the punching or printing ends of the impression elements can be varied. Thus, they may be circular or hexagonal or octagonal with the sides continuous, and the selection of I specific impression elements for any particular character would be influenced by the shape and arrangement of such elements in the multiple impression field.

Changes may be made and parts only of the invention employed witliout'departure from the scope of the appended claims.

We claim as our invention: 7

1. In a telegraphic sign system, a perforating mechanism adapted to produce a plurality of arrangements of perforations, normally inoperative. index members for selecting each such ars rangement, a telegraphic receiving device responsive to signal conditions and efiective to operatively condition said'index members one at a time and power means controlled by said receiving device for *eii'ecting the operation of the conditioned index members.

2. In combination, a plurality of individual punches, selecting devices each separately shiftable from normal inoperative condition to render operable a plurality of said punches, said selecting devices corresponding to the different characters to be recorded and being materially less in number than the number of individual punches rendered operable.

3. In a sign controlling apparatus, a tape perforating device comprising a plurality of individual punches, a plurality of normally inoperative, character determining members, each separately shiftable to operative position to select a predetermined group of said punches, and means for effecting the operation of the selected groups of punches to form directly legible characters.

4. Ina sign controlling apparatus, a tape perforating device comprising a plurality of individual punches, a plurality of normally inoperative character members, individually shiftable to operative position to select a predetermined group' oi said punches for iorming a directly legible design, means for effecting the operation of the selected groups of punches, and permu- .tation means responsive to signal conditions for selectively shifting any one of said members to operative position and for'initiating the operation of said punch operating means.

5. In a sign controllingapparatus, a tape im-- pression device comprising a plurality of recording elements, means for selecting certain of said elements to form letters in one line,- and means for selecting certain of said elements to form figures in another line, some of said individual elements being used for both letters and ual punch and a plate surrounding all 01' saidv punches, an operating member for each individual punch and a plate surrounding all of said operating members and adapted to engage a predetermined set of said operating members to eiiect the operation of said individual punches in a directly legible sign.

8. In a sign controlling apparatus, a plurality of individual recording elements, a plurality, of shiftable plates, each such plate adapted to engage a predetermined group of elements arrangedin a directly legible design, each such plate eflecting a design different from others.

9. In a sign controlling apparatus, a plurality of individual punches, a plurality of shiftable plates, each such plate adapted to engage a predetermined group of punches arranged in a directly legible design, each such plate efiecting a design difierent from others, and means for selectingany one of said shiftable plates and for efiecting its operation.

10. In a sign system, a plurality of impression elements, and means for operating said elements in groups. to form and record legible characters including a set of normally inoperative character members each independently shiftable to operative position for determining the group to be operated.

11. In a sign system, a plurality of like impression elements disposed in a recording field, and means for effecting the recording of legible characters on a sign controlling tape comprising a set of selectable character members for determining the operation of the impression elements in groups corresponding in outline to the characters, and permutation mechanism for selecting said character members.

12. In a sign system, a plurality of like impression elements disposed in a recording field, and means for eflecting the recording of legible characters on a sign controlling tape comprising a set of normally inoperative character members each separately shiftable to operative position for determining the operation of the impression elements in groups corresponding in outline to the characters, and key controlled means for operatively positioning the character members and for eilecting the operation of the selected groups of impression elements.

13. In combination in a variable sign controlling apparatus, a plurality of impression ele- .ments disposed in a number of rows. a set of individual character members for selecting said elements in groups corresponding in outline to legible characters, means for effecting the im-' pression of the selected groups of elements upon a tape, means for feeding the-tape, power-actuated mechanism for eiiecting the operation 01' said members and of said impression and tape feeding means, and selector mechanism for conments disposed in a plurality of rows, a set of' normally inoperative members each arranged to control a group of said elements and eflect the impression of the corresponding characters,- selectable devices individual to said members for common actuator for said members.

15'. In combination in a variable sign controlling apparatus, a plurality of impression elements disposed in rows, a set of plates through which said elements extend, means for separately shifting said plates in one direction to select difierent'groups of said elements, and means for bodily shifting said plates in another direction to effect the impression of the selected groups.

16. In combination in a variable sign controlling apparatus, a plurality of impression ele' ments disposed in rows, a set of plates through which said elements extend, a carriage whereon said plates are mounted to shift each in'its own plane, to select. different groups of said elements, a set of selectable members for individually shifting said plates, and means for shifting said-- carriage transversely to the planes of said plates for efiecting the impression of the selected groups of elements.

17. In combination in a variable sign controlling apparatus, a plurality 'of impression ele ments disposed in rows, a set of plates through which said elements extend, a carriage whereon said plates are mounted to shift each in its own plane to select diflerent groups of said elements, a set of selectable members for individually shifting, said plates, said carriage being shiftable' in line with said. elements-to effect the impression of the selected groups, a stationary support, and selector mechanism thereon for controlling the operation'of said selectable members.

18. In combination in a variable sign controlling apparatus, a plurality of elementsdisposed in rows for impressing legible characterson. a sign controlling tape, aset of selectable character members-fordetermining the operation of said elements in character forming groups,

means for effecting the impression of theselected groups, and electrically controlled se= initiating the operation of said impression} I means. .7

19. In combination in a variable sign controlling apparatus, a plurality of elements disposed in rows for impressing legiblecharacters on a sign controlling-tape, a set of selectable character members for determining the operation of said elements character forming groups, means for effecting the impression of the selected groups, and start-stop electrically controlled selector mechanism for determining the operation of saidcharacter member and initiating the operation of said impression means.

20. In combination in an'apparatusfor record- 7 ing legible characters, a plurality of longitudinally movable rods, a set of character determining members individually movable transversely of said rods into operative relation with different groups corresponding to the outline of the characters to be recorded, and'means for eflecting the impression of the characters correspondingto the selected groups of rods. a

21. In'combination 'in an apparatus for recording legible characters, means for intermittently feeding atape through an impression said selector mechanism for eflecting the im pression of characters on the tape corresponding to the different groups of rods and for' operating the tape. feeding means.

STERLING hlORTON.

HQWARD 1.. menu.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2437790 *Jul 27, 1944Mar 16, 1948Trans Lux CorpElectric circuit controller
US2455443 *Oct 12, 1945Dec 7, 1948Rca CorpSecret radio signaling system
US2483281 *Sep 17, 1947Sep 27, 1949Control Instr Co IncSwitching system
US2490608 *Mar 18, 1948Dec 6, 1949Teletype CorpPerforating apparatus
US3273140 *Jul 19, 1963Sep 13, 1966Fair Play Mfg CoCombination message and image display unit
US3763313 *Apr 19, 1972Oct 2, 1973Morat Gmbh FranzApparatus and method of transferring a pattern to a programme carrier
US3934083 *May 10, 1973Jan 20, 1976Mayer & Cie.Method and apparatus for processing the information content of a pattern drawing in coded form
USRE32365 *Jan 5, 1984Mar 3, 1987Sanders Associates, Inc.Precessing display pager
Classifications
U.S. Classification178/24, 178/92, 345/215, 234/102, 235/23
International ClassificationG09G3/00
Cooperative ClassificationG09G3/004
European ClassificationG09G3/00C