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Publication numberUS1973717 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 18, 1934
Filing dateOct 6, 1931
Priority dateOct 6, 1931
Publication numberUS 1973717 A, US 1973717A, US-A-1973717, US1973717 A, US1973717A
InventorsGregory J Kessenich
Original AssigneeGregory J Kessenich
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container and method of forming same
US 1973717 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 18, 1934. G. J. KEssEMcH CONTAINER AND METHOD of FORMING SAME Filed 'oct 6/ 1931 INVENTOR. V E-rednry ll- Kessen th TTORNEY Patented Sept. 18, 1934 UNITED STATES CONTAINER 1.973.717 AND m-z'rnon or some sem Gregory J. K'essenich, Madisonfwis.

Application October a, 1931 Serial No. 567,188

80mins.

(Granted under the act, of March a; 1883, as amended April so, 1928; 370 o.- G. is?) The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government for governmental purposes, without the payment to me of any royalty thereon.

This invention relates to a container and method of forming the same.

The purpose of the present invention is to provide a permanently and hermetically sealed can or container which has an increased surface area, the increase being positioned favorably to heat interchange by being present in the form of an open tube extending through the center of the receptacle.

A further object of the invention is to employ the foregoing construction to advantage in establishing a vent that may be readily and effectively closed.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, the invention resides in the novel arrangement and combination of parts and in the details of construction hereinafter described and claimed, it being understood that changes in the precise embodiment of the invention herein disclosed may be made within the scope of what is claimed without departing from the spirit of the invention.

A practical embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing; wherein: i a

Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view of a container g constructed in accordance with the invention.

Fig. 2 is a plan view thereof.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary vertical sectional.

view showing one manner of forming the joint between the cover and central tube.

Figs. 4 to Bare views similar to Fig. 3 and illustrating variations of the Joint.

The container consists of an imperforate body 5 and end closures 6-6 which are seamed or jointed thereto in any approved mariner, the Joint 7 extending above the plane of the ends. The ends 6 are provided with an aperture 8 preferably located centrally and defined by a flange 9. A tube 10 having an imperforate wall through the aligned apertures 8 and is at least coextensive. with the flanges 9 so that the ends are available to cooperate with the flanges in forming a Joint 11. v

The inner joint 11 is preferably of less height than the joint 7 so that when the containers are placed one on top of another there will. be a space between adjoining ends that is in comsurrounding fluid medium, the tube serving to transmit temperature variations to the contents of the container and to permit the circulation of the fluid medium to the ends.

As shown in Fig. 1 the material of the tube is preferably stamped in a manner to provide an irregular surface 12, theirregularities, such as corrugations, being generally transversely of the tube. This structure is conducive to creating a turbulent flow of a fluid medium to which the G5 tube is exposed and thereby increases the convective temperature transfer. The irregular surfaces further increase the surface area of the tube and gives it greater strength.

Referring to Figs. 3 to 8 there are shown various relationships between one of the flanges 9 and one end of the tube 10, which are especially favorable in those instances where it is desired to provide a vent 13 that may be readily closed.

Such a vent is provided for example to permit the introduction of fluid mediums into the container prior to closing it, to permit vacuumization of the container, or for applying compressed air to test for leakage at the joints of the contherefrom. A sealing material 18 is applied to 35 the exterior of the flange 14. The joint is closed by bending the flange 17 into parallel relations with the flange 14 and applying pressure.

In Fig. 4 the construction is thesame but the sealing material 184 is applied to the inner or under side of the flange 170.

In Fig. 5 the cover or end 19 includes a perpendicular flange 20 which is turned over to establish a flange 21 parallel to the end. 'A

sealing material 22 is placed on the outerside of the flange 21. The tube 23 extends beyond the flange 21 so. that it may be bent over onto the flange 21.

' In Fig. 8 the arrangement is similar to Fig. 5

except that the tube 23a is provided with a preformed perpendicular flange 24 parallel to the flange 21a and a sealing material 25 is placed on either or both of these flanges. .In Fig. 7 the flange 26 on the cover flange 27 on the tube are parallel and inclined away from the tube. A sealing material 28 is preferably placed on the flange 27.

In Fig. 8 the arrangement of Fig. '7 is reversed,

the flanges 26a and 27a are inclined towards the and the axis of the tube and the sealing material 2811 being preferably carried by the flange 26a.

When a fluid medium is introduced into the container to establish an internal pressure in excess of the external pressure the arrangements of Figs. 4, 6 and '7 are employed because when the supply of fluid medium is cut ofi the cover will be moved by the excess internal pressure into contact with the tube to effect a temporary seal until the flange can be united by mechanical means.

When the container is vacuumized the excess external pressure will tend to force the cover inwardly and accordingly the arrangement of Fig. 8 is employed to obtain a temporary seal.

When a larger vent is desired the tube may be finally jointed to the cover or end piece in order to hold the same in a proper position relative to the body and the joining ends of the cover and body may be left in spaced relation until the fluid medium has been introduced or removed from the container.

In the drawing the body 5 and the tube 10 form concentric walls of the container but it is to be understood that more than one tube may be employed and that such additional tubes need not be concentric to the body.

I claim.

1. A can for processing food-stuffs comprising a body, end pieces secured to the body and having aligned apertures, a tube hermetically sealed to the margins of the apertures in the end pieces and open to atmosphere, the surface of the tube being irregular to induce turbulence of a fluid current.

2. A can for processing food-stuffs comprising a body, end pieces secured to the body and having aligned apertures, and a tube hermetically sealed to the margins of the apertures in the end pieces and open to the atmosphere.

3. A can for processing food-stufis comprising a body, apertured end pieces hermetically sealed to the body, and a heat interchanging member hermetically secured to the margins of the apertures in the end pieces and having an open passage therethrough.

4. A container comprising a body, apertured end pieces hermetically jointed to the body, the joint extending above the plane of the end pieces, a hollow member within the body and hermetically jointed to the margins of the apertures in the end pieces said hollow member open to atmosphere, the last mentioned joint being of less height than the first mentioned joint.

5. A can for processing foodstuffs comprising spaced walls on substantially parallel axes, one wall within the other and forming an annular chamber, apertured end pieces for the annular chamber and positioned at the ends of the spaced walls, the margins of the endpieces and the margins of the apertures therein permanently and hermetically jointed to the respective walls.

6. An hermetically closed can for processing foodstufls comprising a body having substantially flat ends and a conduit disposed substantially parallel to the axis of the body and permanently and hermetically joined to the flat ends, said conduit opening through said ends for through flow of atmosphere.

7. The method of forming an hermetically sealed container for sterilizing food stuffs comprising forming open-ended tubes of different diameters, permanently attaching the corresponding ends of the tubes to an end closure having an aperture corresponding to the smaller tube and making the joint with the inner tube of less height than the joint with the outer tube, and then after inserting the material to be sterilized into the annular chamber between the tubes, permanently attaching a similar end closure to the other ends of the tubes and making the joint with the inner tube of less height than the joint with the outer tube.

8. The method of forming an hermetically sealed container for sterilizing food stuffs comprising forming open-ended tubes of different diameters, permanently attaching the corresponding ends of the tubes to an end closure having an aperture corresponding to the smaller tube, and then, after inserting the material to be sterilized into the annular chamber between the tubes, permanently attaching a similar end closure to the other ends of the tubes.

GREGORY J. KESSENICH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2559101 *Aug 13, 1945Jul 3, 1951Wool Frank AFrozen food package
US2706949 *Mar 8, 1950Apr 26, 1955Kessenich Gregory JDemolition unit
US2734530 *Mar 27, 1947Feb 14, 1956Universal Controls CorporationDiaphragm housing
US5529203 *Mar 1, 1995Jun 25, 1996Stanhope Products CompanyDesiccant container having cap retaining nib segments
US5540348 *Mar 1, 1995Jul 30, 1996Stanhope Products CompanyDesiccant container having curved cap member
US5716432 *Feb 12, 1996Feb 10, 1998Stanhope Products CompanyDesiccant container
US5837039 *Apr 17, 1996Nov 17, 1998Stanhope Products CompanyAdsorbent packet for air conditioning accumulators
US5914456 *Oct 22, 1997Jun 22, 1999Stanhope Products CompanyAdsorbent packet for air conditioning accumulators
US20100006568 *Aug 13, 2007Jan 14, 2010Rainer HaebererTank for storing a reducing agent
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/154, 220/906, 174/50, 220/506, 426/131, 29/455.1
International ClassificationB65D81/20
Cooperative ClassificationY10S220/906, B65D81/2015, B65D7/42
European ClassificationB65D81/20B1, B65D7/42