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Publication numberUS1974047 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 18, 1934
Filing dateMar 3, 1932
Priority dateMar 3, 1932
Publication numberUS 1974047 A, US 1974047A, US-A-1974047, US1974047 A, US1974047A
InventorsNorman P Harshberger
Original AssigneeBakelite Building Prod Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shingle and method of producing the same
US 1974047 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P N. P. HARsHBERER SHING'LE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 3, 1932 I Ej INVENTOR.

' ATTORNEY.

S P 934- N.-P. HARSHBERGER SHINGLE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME Filed March 3, 1932 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 R m E V m ATTORNEY'.

Sept-H118, 1934- NJP. HARSHB ERGER SHINGLE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME Filed March 3,1932 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR.

ATTORNEYJ.

Patented Sept. 18, 1934 UNITED -STATES SHINGLE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAIVE Norman P. Harshberger, Scarsdale, N. Y., as-

signor to Bakelite Building Products Co. Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware Application March 3, 1932, Serial No. 596,455

16 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in shingles and method of producing the same.

The ordinary type of shingle element having tabs projecting from the lower edge thereof is so formed that the tabs are identical in shape and equal in size to produce a group of like figures in assembly. This type of shingle element can only be laid in one particular manner, and due'to the fact that all of the figures are identical a relatively monotonous effect is created.

It is one of the objects of the present invention to provide an improved shingle having a plurality of tabs in connection therewith in which said tabs are of unequal size with the result that the shingles can be laid in any one of a plurality of selected ways to produce varied effects.

A further object of the invention is to provide shingles of the type described above which, as a result of the peculiar formation of the tabs, can be laid in wide spaced relation to obtain economical coverage.

A more specific object of the invention is to provide a roof covering formed of shingles each having a plurality of tabs of unequal size in which the shingles may be so laid that the ends thereof are spaced apart, and in which said spaced ends are covered by the wider tabs of shingles in a course above.

A further specific object of the invention is to provide shingles which may be formed with a novel form of interlocking aligning means which may be utilized when the shingles are to be laid in a particular manner.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved method of forming shingle elements having tabs of unequal size, said method entirely eliminating waste in cutting.

With the above and other objects in view the invention consists of the improved shingles and method of producing the same, and all the parts and combinations thereof, and all equivalents.

In the accompanying drawings in which the same reference numerals designate the same parts in all of the views:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a portion of a web of roofing material showing the manner of cutting one type of shingle element therefrom;

Fig. 2 is a plan view showing an assembly of elements cut from the web illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of a modified form of assembly;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged sectional view taken on line 44 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a plan view of a portion of a web of roofing material showing the method of cutting another type of shingle;

Fig. 6 is a plan view showing one manner of assembling units out from the web of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a plan view of another manner of assembling said elements;

Fig. 8 is a plan view of a portion of a web of roofing material showing the method of cutting still another type of shingle;

Fig. 9 is a plan view of one of the cut shingles;

Fig. 10 is a plan view of an assembly of a plurality of elements of Fig. 9;

Fig. 11 is a plan view showing a modified form of assembly of the elements of Fig. 9; and

Fig. 12 is a plan view of a modified form of shingle of the type assembled in Fig. 3.

Referring to the drawings, a web, preferably of the usual felt base composition roofing material preferably surfaced on both sides to permit reversal of the shingles formed therefrom, is cut on an irregular longitudinal line 15 and on transverse lines 16 and 17 which extend from the sides of the web to portions of the longitudinal line of cut 15, the lines of cut 16 being offset from the lines of cut 17. Inasmuch as it is desired to produce shingles having tabs of unequal size a problem is presented in cutting. This is taken care of by having the longitudinal line of cut 15 extend in such a manner that it forms two wide tabs 18 and then two narrow tabs 19. One of the wide tabs is in connection with a shingle on one side of the web and the adjacent wide tab is in connection with the shingle on the other side of the web and similarly one of the narrow tabs is in connection with a shingle on one side of the web and the adjacent narrow tab is in connection with a shingle on the opposite side of the web. The transverse lines of cut 1'7 are arranged to extend from one edge of the web to the center of one of the tabs 19 and the transverse lines of cut 16 are arranged to extend from the other side of the web to the. center of the adjacent tabs 19. Thus a plurality of identical shingle elements is formed Without waste with each shingle having'one wide tab and one narrow tab separated by a space equal in width to the width of the wide tab.

It is preferred to lay the shingles which are designated generally by the numeral 20 in the manner indicated in Fig. 2 with the ends 21 spaced apart a substantial distance. These spaced ends are then overlapped by the wide tab of a shingle in a course above. Thus proper protection is obtained with wide spacing. If the tabs were of the same size this manner of assembly would not be possible.

It is further to be noted that a very attractive design is produced and said design consists of alternating diagonally extending rows of squares and L-shaped figures.

It is also possible to form the shingles 20 with interior tongues 20' as shown in Fig. 12 and to lay them in the manner indicated in Fig. 3 wherein the tabs 18 and 19 of the shingles in one course are dropped below the spaces between tabs of the course below as indicated by the numeral 22, and

wherein the tongues 20' are engaged beneath the upper edge of shingles of the course below. This affords still greater protection for the roof. When the shingles are thus laid the lower edges of the tabs may be made to curve downwardly as indicated in Fig. 4 at the point where the numeral 22 is applied. This downward bend adds lateral rigidity to the exposed ends of the shingles. Obviously the tongues 20' may be positioned to cause alinement as in Fig. 2, or to produce any desired arrangement in assembly.

When this type of shingle is laid as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the wide tabs may be employed as a gauge in the spacing of the ends of two elements apart. Thus, if the distance between the outer side edge of the tab of one element and the outer side edge of the first tab of an adjacent element is equal to the width of one of the wide tabs, then proper spacing of the ends of two adjacent elements in the same course is insured.

The same principle may be used to produce shingles having semi-hexagonal tabs. As indicated in Fig. 5 a web of material is cut on an irregular longitudinal line 23 and on transverse lines 24 and 25 extending inwardly from opposite sides of the web to produce shingles 26 each having a wide tab 2'7 and a narrow tab 28 spaced apart by a recess equal in size to the wide tab.

The shingles 26 or the shingles 20 may be laid in the manner indicated in Fig 6 with the ends 29 thereof abutting and with the lower edges of the tabs registering with the upper edges of the recesses between tabs of the course below. The eifect produced by the shingles 26 will be that of a plurality of groupings of small and large hexagons, and that produced by the shingles 20 would be a plurality of groupings of small and large rectangles.

For more economical coverage the shingles 26 may be laid in the manner shown in Fig. '7 with the ends 29 spaced apart and with the spaces between adjacent ends covered by the wide tabs. The effect in assembly will be diagonally extending rows of hexagons and diagonally extending rows of unlike figures which alternate with one another.

Still another type of shingle embodying the same general principle can be produced in the manner shown in Fig. 8 by cutting the web upon a wavy longitudinal line 30 and upon transverse lines 31 and 32 which extend inwardly from opposite sides of the web. This method produces a plurality of like shingles 33 each having a wide tab 34 and a narrow tab 35 the sides of which are formed by ogee curves. Other cuts are made in pairs as at 36 which extend from the center of the space between the tabs inwardly for a distance, said clits forming aligning tongues 37.

In assembly the shingles 33 may be laid in the manner indicated in Fig. 10, the tongues 37 of one shingle being engaged below the upper edge of a shingle in the course below as indicated by the numeral 38 in Fig. 10. The ends 39 of the shingles are also in abutting relation. The result is that the lower portions of the tabs 34 and 35 project below the upper edges of the recesses of the shingles in the course below, some of the tabs therefore ofiering maximum protection over the slits 36 which form the tongues 37.

The shingle 33 may also be laid in the manner indicated in Fig. 11 with the ends 39 of the shingles in the same course spaced apart and with the wide tabs 34 covering the spaces between adjacent ends 39 of shingles in the course below,

This method of laying is adapted to create an eifect similar to thatching on a roof.

The element of Fig. 9 need not be provided with all three of the aligning tongues 37, as it is obvious that the central tongue alone, the two end tongues, or the central tongue and one end tongue, would function satisfactorily to accomplish the desired purpose.

In the assembly of all of the forms, nails may be utilized in desired portions of the elements, preferably beneath exposed tabs of elements above.

From the abovev it may be seen that the im proved shingles have wide and narrow tabs and can be utilized in a number of different ways to create varied effects and can be laid in spaced relation to one another to provide economical coverage when desired.

It is to be understood that any desired number of tabs 18 and 19, suitably arranged, may be formed on a single element and that other changes and modifications may be made, as may come within the scope of the claims, without departing from the scope of the invention.

What I claim is:

1. A shingle element adapted to be laid in a plurality of ways to create different effects and diiferent degrees of coverage, comprising a body portion having a wide tab and an adjacent narrow tab depending from an edge thereof, said tabs being of similar configuration, and there being a recess between saidtabs which is substantially equal and complementary to one of said tabs and the body portion projecting laterally beyond the tab formation a total distance no greater than the width of the other tab.

2. A shingle element adapted to be laid in a plurality of ways to create diifcrent effects and different degrees of coverage, comprising a body portion having a wide tab and a narrow tab depending from an edge thereof, there being a recess between said tabs which is substantially equal and complementary to the wide tab, and the body portion projecting laterally at least at one end a distance not greater than half the width of the narrow tab.

3. Shingle elements assembled on a roof in overlapping courses, each course having alternating depending tabs and recesses, the tabs being of unequal width, and a recess of each element being equal and complementary to the tabs of greater width, the ends of adjacent elements being spaced apart such a distance as to provide a space between end tabs of adjacent elements which is substantially equal in width to the tabs of greater width and the tabs ofone course overlapping the body portion of a course below with the wide tabs positioned over the spaced apart ends of adjacent elements of said course below to afford economical protection therefor.

4. Shingle elements assembled on a roof in overlapping courses, each course having alternating depending tabs and recesses, the tabs being of unequal width, and some of the recesses being equal and complementary to tabs of one width,

the ends of adjacent elements being spaced apart a distance approximately equal to half the width of the wider tabs, the tabs of one course overlapping the body portion of a course below with the wide tabs positioned over the spaced apart ends of adjacent elements of said course below to afford protection therefor.

5. Shingle elements assembled on a roof in overlapping courses, each course having altemating depending tabs and recesses, the tabs being of unequal width, and a recess of each element being equal and complementary to tabs of one width, the ends of adjacent elements being spaced apart such a distance as to provide a space between tabs of adjacent elements which is substantially equal in width to the tabs of greater width and the tabs of one course overlapping the body portion of a course below with the wide tabs positioned over the spaced apart ends of adjacent elements of said course below to afiord protection therefor, the tabs having downwardly bent lower edges which extend below the upper edges of the recesses of the course below.

6. Shingle strips laid in overlapping courses each strip comprising a body portion having a lower edge formed with alternating tabs and recesses therebetween complementary to certain tabs, the body portion of each strip being formed between tabs with means engageable with the upper edge of a course below to so aline the courses that the tabs of one course project below the edges of the recesses of said course below to properly protect the engaging means of said course below.

'7. A shingle element adapted to be laid in a plurality of ways to create different effects and different degrees of coverage, comprising a body portion having depending from an edge thereof a wide and an adjacent narrow tab of similar configuration, and of substantially equal length, there being a recess between said tabs, substantially equal and complementary to one of said adjacent tabs, and the body portion projecting laterally beyond the tab formation a total distance substantially no greater than the width of the other tab.

8. Shingle elements assembled on a surface in overlapping courses, each course having a plurality of adjacent elements, each element comprising a body portion having a pair of adjacent depending tabs of unequal width and of similar configuration, a recess between said said tabs on each element being substantially equal and com plementary to one of said adjacent tabs and the body portion projecting laterally beyond the tab formation a total distance substantially, no greater than the width of the other tab, and the tabs of one course overlapping the body portions of a course below with some of the tabs positioned over the joints of the body portions of adjacent elements to afford protection therefor, said assembly producing a surface of pleasing appearance and high weather protection with a low footage of material.

9. Strip shingle elements comprising body portions with similar shingle size tabs depending therefrom, assembled on a roof in overlapping courses, each course having alternating tabs and recesses, the tabs being of unequal width, some of the recesses between tabs of each course being substantially equal and complementary to tabs of one width and other recesses being formed between the endmost side edges of tabs of adjacent elements, the ends of adjacent elements being spaced apart a distance no greater than the width of the widest tab, and the tabs of one course overlapping the body portion of elements of a course below with the wide tabs positioned overthe spaced apart ends of adjacent elements to afford protection therefor and the lower edges of the tabs extending below the upper edges of the recesses of said course below.

10. The method of producing corresponding shingle elements having a pair of tabs of unequal wi'dth comprising cutting an elongated web of material along an intermediate line which extends generally in a longitudinal direction but which has portions extending toward one side of the web and portions extending toward the other side of the web to form alternately, a plurality of adjacent, oppositely disposed similar, equal tabs of one width and a plurality of adjacent, oppositely disposed equal tabs of another width and of similar configuration to the tabs of the first width, cutting the web on spaced transverse lines which extend from one side of the web to substantially the center of the lower edge of the tabs of one Width, and cutting the web on other spaced transverse lines which extend from the other side of the web to substantially the center of the lower edge of adjacent and oppositely disposed tabs of the same width.

11. Shingle elements assembled on a surface in overlapping courses, each course comprising a plurality of adjacent elements, each element comprising a body portion having a pair of similar depending tabs of unequal width and of substantial size forming shingle-like exposures when laid and having lower unequal weather edges in the course, and said tabs having a recess therebetween substantially equal and complementary to one of the tabs and disclosing shingle-like areas of a course below, said body portion also having lateral projections beyond the tabs, the total projection for any element being no greater than the width of the other tab, and said projections being so positioned in the course as to provide a space between tabs of adjacent elements no greater than the width of the tab of greatest width and the tabs of one course overlapping the body portion of a course below with the wide tabs positioned over the projecting ends of the body portions of adjacent elements to afford protection therefor.

12. A strip shingle adapted to be laid with other similar shingles in a plurality of ways to create random shingle effects and different degrees of economical coverage, said strip comprising a body portion having a wide and a narrow tab of similar configuration l depending therefrom, said tabs being of different width and having lower weather edges of different width and each tab being of substantial size to form shingle-like exposures when laid, there being a recess between said tabs substantially equal in width and complementary to one of the tabs, and the body portion projecting laterally at the ends a total distance substantially equal to the width of the other tab.

13. Shingle strips laid in overlapping courses, each strip comprising a body portion having a lower edge formed with alternating tabs and recesses, the body portion of each strip being provided with spacing and supporting tongues extending inwardly at its lower edge portion, said tongues comprising pairs of spaced apart substantially up and down slits within the end edges of the strip and adjacent the recesses and said tongues being engaged beneath the upper edge portion of strips of an adjacent course below to space and align the courses.

14. A building surface comprising a plurality of similar strip shingles adapted to be laid in courses in a plurality of ways to obtain different effects and difierent degrees of economical coverage without exposure of the building foundation beneath, said shingles comprising body portions having a wide and an adjacent narrow tab of similar configuration depending from edges thereof, and having lateral projecting portions beyond the tabs, the said tabs of different widths also having lower edges of diflerent width and there being a space between the adjacent tabs substantially equal and complementary to one of said tabs, said shingles being laid in courses with each course presenting alternate shingle size tabs and spaces with each alternate tab in a series 'being of different width and with all the spaces out altering the relationship between courses, said shingles comprising body portions having a wide rectangular tab and an adjacent similar narrow tab depending from an edge thereof and having projecting body portions beyond the tabs, there being a space between the tabs of each shingle equal and complementary to one of the tabs and said shingles being laid in courses with their projecting body portions so positioned as to form courses of alternating shingle tabs and spaces with each alternating tab in a course of difierent width and all the spaces substantiallyequal in width to one of the tabs.

16. Shingle elements adapted to be laid in a plurality of ways to create different effects and difi'erent degrees of economical coverage without exposure of the surface foundation beneath, said elements each comprising a body portion having a lower edge formed with an ogee curve to provide a wide and an adjacent narrow curved tab, each of substantial size to form shingle-like exposures when laid, there being arecess between said adjacent tabs which is substantially equal and complementary to one of said tabs and the body portion projecting laterally beyond the tab formation a total distance no greater than the width of other tab.

NORMAN P. HARSHBERGER.

Classifications
U.S. Classification52/555, D25/139
International ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26
European ClassificationE04D1/26