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Publication numberUS1974543 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 25, 1934
Filing dateMay 2, 1931
Priority dateMay 2, 1931
Publication numberUS 1974543 A, US 1974543A, US-A-1974543, US1974543 A, US1974543A
InventorsReymond Martin H
Original AssigneeReymond Martin H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe construction
US 1974543 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept 25, 1934 M. H. REYMOD 1,974,543v

SHOE CONSTRUCTION Filed May 2. 1931 Fqure 5 I Patented Sept. A25, 1934 UNITED STATI-:s APA'riazjN'r OFFICE musi:

suon coNsrnUcrroN Martin H. Reymond, Binghamton, N. Y.

' application my z, 1931, sena No. 534,667 1o emma. (ci. Y12-142) The principal object of this invention is to provide a shoe in which the ilexing portion between the tip and the arch is constructed in such a manner that the flexure takes place in regular I predenedridges in the upper of the shoe. This invention further involves particular characteristics in such ridges. It further involves the process of forming these ridges by incorporation in the last. It fin'ther involves such a process inl cluding certain other characteristics. g

In the past, with the usual methods of constructing shoes, the upper has been permitted to ex in an irregular manner at the principal iiexing portion (commonly called thevamp) bel tween the tip and the arch. 'I'his irregular :dex-

ure is not only unsightly and incompatible with the artistic beauty of many shoes, but it also contributes toward discomfort and deterioration. The irregular exure may cause discomfort by pressing on some sensitive portion of the foot. The lack of allowance for exure of the toes downward as well as upward mayalso cause disvcomiort. 'Ihis is particularly noticeable when climatic conditions are such asfto cause the up-.

per to shrink, blowing up the sole and hindering the toes from proper freedom of contact with the ground. The construction of the flexing portion in ridges, somewhat after the fashion of Va. and then by dropping cap 4 down toward the Sole bellows, permits such freedom. This ridge or o bellows construction also tends to help ventilate the shoe as it iiexes.` This ridge construction also reduces the tendency of shoes. of the usual construction to wear at the vamp, by eliminating the strain when toes bend downward, and by elim- 5 inating the tendency of shoes without ridges to ex at the weakest point in the upper material thus concentrating the greatest strain where it canleast be withstood, v

Referring to the drawing: Figure 1 is a top view c of a right foot shoe, illustrating the ridge con'- struction that. has been described in general terms. Figure 2 is a side Aview of such a shoe. Figure 3 is a side view of a last, on which are incorporated the ridges itl is desired toY incor- 5 porate into the shoe. These ridges are shown incorporated onto this last by means of a toe cap so constructed as to facilitate removal from the shoe. Figure 4 illustrates one method of setting the upper into the valleys between ridges. This 0 is across sectional view of a plane located as indicated by 4-4 in-Figure 1. However in Figure 4l the last and setting means, which do not appear in Figure 1, are shown.

As a makeshift proposition it mightl be possible 5 to. incorporate ridges such as described into with the lining in the setting operation Referalready ilnished shoes, by clamping the vamp between jaws containing such ridges, or by inserting a secondary last containing such ridges, and to some extent stretching and setting the upper into such ridges by pressure, heat, s'tiffening com- 60 pound, or other elements.

For best results, however, these ridges should be built into the shoe in the rst place. Itis conceivable to accomplish this by building into the upper material stiiening ribs or iexible channels or both along the lines ofthe desired ridges. A preferred way of building these ridges, not in volving the necessity of such ribs or-channels, is illustrated in the drawing and described in fur-v ther detail below.

By this preferred method, the desired ridges `are incorporatedonto the last. These ridges on on the last are incorporated onto a removable cap over the toeof thelast. See Figure 3, cap 4 over last 5. This makes it possible, after the shoe is completely assembled, to remove last 5,

to easily remove this cap. If the 'ridges were solid on the last, it would be difficult to remove this last from the shoe. v

With the ridges thus incorporated onto the last, the upperfcanbe moulded over these ridges in the lasting operation. To insure the permanency of the location. of these ridges, they can be set by ironing in or by some other method involving pressure alone or pressure and heat. 'Ihey can be further made permanent by application of some stiiening material to the upper before` this setting operation.` They can further bemade permanent by the application of a suitable adhesive backing behind the upper, which can be incorporated withk the upper and perhaps also vThese may be cords adapted to be pulled tightly around the last into ,these valleys. Or they may be heavy elastic bands adapted to nt tightlyV around the last. After being subjected to whatever heat process or otherlsvetting process desired,

ridges permanently incorporated in the shoe.

There are certain advantageous general characteristics of such ridges that will now be described.

First it is advantageous that the greatest height of these ridges should be at the top o! the shoe.

Line 4 4 in Figure 1 is approximately at the top of the shoe where these are highest. 'I'hese ridges gradually taper on to negligible height at the sides of thev shoe near the sole. The greatest height is at thetop because that is where the greatest ilexure takes place. The height is negligible at the sides near the sole as here the iiexure is comparatively negligible. Also this-makes possible lasting the upper to the sole without the.

tures illustrated and described are of course possible. These particular constructional features are merely illustrative of preferred ways of carrying out this invention.` Similar variations are also possible in the particular process described for achieving such constructional features. The

definition of the exact scope of the present invention, including all possible variations, and also including particular preferred variations, has been attempted in the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed is:

1. A shoe in which the principal exing portion of the upper between the tip and the arch includes predefined regular ridges of flexure, said ridges decreasing in altitude to substantially negligible altitude as they approach the sole.

2. A shoe in which'the principal flexing portion of the upper between .the tip and the arch includes predenned regular ridges of iexure, said ridges decreasing in altitude to substantially negligible altitude as they approach the sole, and said ridges being moulded in said upper wholly above the normal inner surface of said shoe.

3. A shoe in which the principal flexing portion of the upper between the tip and the arch includes predefined regular ridges of flexure, said 'ridges decreasing in altitude to substantially negiigible altitude as they approach the sole. said N 1,974,543 `these setting means may be removed, leaving the Variations in the particular constructional fearidges being moulded in said upper wholly above the normal inner surface of said shoe-'and said ridges running generally crosswise of'the shoe and curving toward the rear on the outside of the shoe.

4. A shoe in which the principal flexing portion of the upper between the tip and the arch includes predened regular ridges of ilexure, said ridges decreasing in altitude to substantially negligible altitude as they approach the soie, and said ridges running generally crosswise of the shoe and daring apart on the outside of the shoe as they approach the sole.

5. In a shoe, an upper having they principal flexing portion between'the tip and the arch re- 'enforced with a stiifening material'and having predeilned regular ridges of ilexure formed in said portion and permanently retained by said stiffening material. 1

6. In a shoe, an upper having the principal 0 flexing portion between the tip and the arch reenforced with an adhesive backing material and having predefined regular ridges of iiexure formed in said portion and permanently retained by said adhesive backing material. lil

'1. The process of constructing a shoe, comprising: incorporating elevated ridges onto a cap fitting over theI last, lasting the upper. over the composite last thus formed, bottoming the shoe, removing thelast without thecap, and ilnally 1( removing the cap first pressing it downward away from the moulded ridges in the shoe.

8. The process of constructing a shoe, comprising: incorporating elevated ridges onto a cap iitting over the last, lasting the upper over the composite last thus formed, intensifying the ridges in the upper by simultaneously setting the upper into the valleys between ridges on the cap, bottoming the shoe, removing the last without the cap. and finally remoiving the cap. 1;

9. The combinationiof: a last, ridges mounted on said last wholly above the normal surface of said last, said ridges running generally crosswise of the last between the tip and the arch, and said ridges decreasing in altitude to substantially 11 negligible altitude as they approach the sole.

10. The combination of: a last, ridges mounted on said last wholly above the normal'surface of said last. and means for pressing the upper of a shoe moulded on said last between all said ridges 1 simultaneously, said ridges running generally crosswise of the last between the tip and the arch, and said ridges decreasing in altitude to substantially negligible altitude as they approach the sole.

MARTIN H. REYMOND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4354319 *Dec 19, 1980Oct 19, 1982Block Barry HAthletic shoe
US4562652 *Nov 10, 1983Jan 7, 1986Koflach Sportgerate Gesellschaft M.B.H.Shoe or boot
US6519876 *Jul 5, 2000Feb 18, 2003Kenton Geer Design Associates, Inc.Footwear structure and method of forming the same
US6701643Dec 3, 2002Mar 9, 2004Kenton Geer Design Associates, Inc.Footwear structure and method of forming the same
US7059067Nov 14, 2003Jun 13, 2006Kenton D. GeerFootwear structure and method of forming the same
US7155846Jun 3, 2004Jan 2, 2007Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with exterior ribs
US7178271Dec 14, 2004Feb 20, 2007Columbia Insurance CompanySole with improved construction
US7591083Jun 13, 2006Sep 22, 2009Kenton D. GeerFootwear structure and method of forming the same
US7818900 *Nov 30, 2006Oct 26, 2010Roces S.R.L.Inner boot, particularly for a sports shoe
US8381416Oct 26, 2010Feb 26, 2013Kenton D. GeerFootwear structure and method of forming the same
US20120180339 *Nov 5, 2009Jul 19, 2012Desarrollo Integral Del Molde, S.L.Flexible footwear
WO2005120274A1 *Jun 3, 2005Dec 22, 2005Nike IntArticle of footwear with exterior ribs
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/45, 12/142.00R, 12/146.00C, 12/146.00R, 12/133.00R
International ClassificationA43B23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA43B23/02
European ClassificationA43B23/02