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Publication numberUS1975067 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 25, 1934
Filing dateAug 15, 1932
Priority dateAug 15, 1932
Publication numberUS 1975067 A, US 1975067A, US-A-1975067, US1975067 A, US1975067A
InventorsJames O Colclasure
Original AssigneePioneer Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fuel burner
US 1975067 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 25, 1934.

J. O. COLCLASURE FUEL BURNER Filed Aug. 15, 1932 f ,mvzmoa F Jgmes 0. Co/c/asu/"e ORNEY Patented Sept. 25, 1934 James 0. C0lclasure, 1ulsa, Oklai, assignor to Pioneer Corporation, Tulsa, Okla, a corpora- V ,tion ofEDeIaWare Application August f5, 1932,? "Serial 'No. "628,541 ZClaims; 1 (creas -14o)- The invention relates to fuel burners, and has for. its object to provide means whereby .a propelling fluid is deflected in relation to an oil duct outlet end in a manner whereby a vacuum is formed adjacent said .end, thereby facilitating the spraying and projecting operation.

A further object is to provide means :adjacen the discharge end of an ,oil duct of a burner whereby a propelling fluid is deflected angularly away from the oil duct end and angularlyout wardly and towards the oilduct end, thereby forming a vacuum pocket-adjacent the, oil ;duct

7 end f or sucking oil through the duct and facilitating the mixingand spraying operation.

A further object is to provide-an oilfburner having adjacent oil and propelling fluid cham bers connected by an oil duct, and ashoulder adjacent thedischarge end of the ;oil duct and .inclining atan acute angle to the axis fthe oil duct in a position whereby propelling fluid will be projected away from the duct end.

A further object is to provide the propelling fluid passage with an angular deflecting shoulder positioned whereby the propelling fluid will be deflected towards and away from the duct discharge end against an opposing angular wall positioned whereby, not only a vacuum pocket is formed around the duct discharge end, but means whereby the mixed fluid or gases will be discharged upwardly towards the bottom of a boiler, still, furnace and the like.

A further object is to provide the burner head at the discharge end of the fluid propelling passage with a forwardly extending drip lip having a forwardly flared channel in the upper side thereof, thereby allowing the gasified air to be discharged fanwise without dripping or slobber- A further object is to provide in combination with an oil burner nozzle having a downwardly extending oil duct, means whereby a propelling fluid, immediately before it reaches the discharge end of the oil duct, will be constricted by a forwardly and downwardly inclined arcuate shoulder and deflected against a flat upwardly and outwardly inclined wall opposite the discharge end of the oil duct, thereby forming a vacuum pocket around the discharge end of the oil duct for facilitating the gasiflcation of the oil.

With the above and other objects in view the invention resides in the combination and arrangement of parts as hereinafter set forth, shown in the drawing, described and claimed, it being understood that changes in the precise embodiment of the invention may be made within the scope of whatis claimed without departing from the spiritvof the invention. i

In the drawing: Figure 1 is a perspective View in longitudinal section through the burner. Figure 2 is a front elevation of the burner. Figure 3 is a vertical longitudinal sectional viewthrough the burner. v

' Figure lis a top plan view of the burner.

.Figure 5 is a verticallong'itudinal sectional view throug'liflaY-niodifled form of burnenshowing a downwardly and forwardly inclined oil duct.

Q Re'ferringto the drawing, the numeral 1 desig nates the body of 'theburner and 2 an oil chamber therein, and 'into'which'oil is discharged through an. oil supply pipe '3. Extending downwardly through the'body 1 and connecting the chamber 2 andthe chamber' l, th fQllgh which a propelling fluid 'passes' 'from'the ,supplyfpipe 5, is anfoil duct 6.1 In devices of this character heretofore cor-1stru'.cted, ,the'air 'orf'other propelling fluid passes throughthe chamber 4 and entrains oil or other fluid from the lower end 6a of the duct 6.

To overcome the above difficulty the air supply pipe 10 discharges its contents against a downwardly and forwardly inclined shoulder 7, arcurate in vertical transverse cross section and located rearwardly of the discharge end 611 of the oil duct. The air is deflected downwardly against the forwardly and upwardly inclining wall 4a of the chamber 4 and thence upwardly by said wall, forming a vacuum pocket 8.

It will be noted that the vacuum pocket 8 is at the lower end of the oil duct 6, consequently oil will be sucked from said lower end of the duct into the air train, so that it will be thoroughly broken up and gasifled as it is discharged forwardly and upwardly into a furnace, boiler, still or the like. By discharging forwardly and upwardly a decided advantage is obtained as a flame will be discharged upwardly towards the bottom of a boiler, still, furnace or the like, when the device is used beneath the same. The upwardly and forwardly inclined deflecting surface 4a terminates in a downwardly and forwardly inclined fan shaped discharge channel 9, therefore it will be seen that the gasifled fuel will spread over a relatively large surface horizontally, being limited only by the side flanges 16,

clearly shown in Figures 4 and 2. By inclining l the surface 9 downwardly the possibilities of dripping or slobbering are reduced to a minimum, and it will be noted by referring to Figures 3 and 5, the flat surface 9 is carried by a forwardly extending lip 11, extending beyond end 6a of the duct 6, it will be seen that the vacuum pocket 8 is formed at the lower. end of the oil duct.

The body 1 is provided with a clean out plug in alinement with the fuel port 6, andwhich plug when removed allows access of a tool or instrument into the fuel port, said plug being desig-,

nated by the numeral 12.

Referring to the modified form shown in Figure 5, the fuel port 13 inclines downwardly and forwardly towards the vacuum pocket 4, thereby facilitating the feeding of fuel to the vacuum chamber in a forward and downward direction for entrainment with the propelling fluid.

From the above it will be seen that a fluid burner is provided with means whereby a vacuum pocket is formed by the propelling fluid, for instance air at high velocity at the discharge end of the fuel port, thereby increasing the mixture before it is projected from the end of the burner. It will also be seen that the fuel is directed upwardly in a fanwise shape, thereby providing a burner particularly adapted for use beneath a boiler, still, furnace or the like, and for distributing the flame over a large area.

The invention having been set forth what is claimed as new and useful is:-

1. A fluid burner comprising a body member having a fuel receiving chamber in the upper side thereof, a pressure fluid chamber in the lower side thereof terminating in a discharge orifice,

said pressure fluid chamber having its upper walls horizontal and its lower wall inclining upwardly and outwardly, a port of communication between said chambers, the discharge end of said port of communication being spaced from the ends of the upper wall of the lower chamber, a rear extension of said pressure chamber having an upward and rearwardly inclined upper wall, said upwardly and rearwardly inclined upper wall forming means whereby propelling fluid is projec'ted downwardly into engagement with the upwardly and outwardly inclined bottom wall of the lower chamber at a point opposite the port of communication between the chambers, said upwardly and outwardly inclined wall deflecting the propelling fluid upwardly and outwardly from said point opposite the port of communication between the chambers whereby entrained fluid fuel will be projected upwardly and outwardly from a point adjacent the discharge end of the port of the communication between the chambers. 2. A fluid burner comprising a body member having an upper fuel chamber, a lower propelling fluid chamber having a discharge orifice, said lower propelling fuel chamber having its lower side inclined upwardly and outwardly, a port of communication between the chambers and discharging into the lower chamber at its upper side and spaced from the ends thereof, a rearward extension of said fluid propelling chamber having an upwardly and rearwardly inclined deflecting wall spaced rearwardly from the port of communication, said upwardly and rearwardly inclined deflecting wall being positioned whereby propelling fluid passing through the lower chamber extension will be deflected into engagement with the upwardly and outwardly inclined bottom of the lower chamber at a point opposite the port of communication between the chambers.

JAMES O. COLCLASURE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2527009 *Feb 13, 1947Oct 24, 1950American Metal Co LtdGun for making powdered metal and like material
US3069091 *Oct 1, 1959Dec 18, 1962Ametek IncBlower with atomizing means
US3211377 *Jun 28, 1963Oct 12, 1965Grace W R & CoMethod of prevention of nozzle fouling
US3242098 *Apr 3, 1961Mar 22, 1966Andrews Edward FVapor and fog generation
US3251556 *Dec 26, 1963May 17, 1966Bete Fog Nozzle IncHumidifier nozzle
US3716194 *Sep 16, 1970Feb 13, 1973Economics LabCombination high pressure venturi and spray forming nozzle
US4365754 *Jun 19, 1980Dec 28, 1982Acheson Industries, Inc.Spray assembly construction
US4567912 *Jul 30, 1984Feb 4, 1986Acheson Industries, Inc.Multiple spray nozzles
US4726934 *Sep 27, 1985Feb 23, 1988Cabot CorporationReduced grit content
US20110006086 *Sep 22, 2010Jan 13, 2011Yates James MFoam soap generator
WO1994004873A1 *Aug 17, 1993Mar 3, 1994Energy Essentials IncCompact liquid-fuel combuster
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/434
International ClassificationF23D11/10
Cooperative ClassificationF23D11/10
European ClassificationF23D11/10