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Publication numberUS1975661 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1934
Filing dateMar 11, 1932
Priority dateMar 11, 1932
Publication numberUS 1975661 A, US 1975661A, US-A-1975661, US1975661 A, US1975661A
InventorsEdward R Powell
Original AssigneeEdward R Powell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disk wheel for roller skates
US 1975661 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 2, 1934. R POWELL 1,975,661

DISK WHEEL FOR ROLLER SKATES Filed March 11, 1932 INVENTOR.

Patented Oct. 2, 1934- UNITED STATES 1,975,661 DISK WHEEL FOR ROLLER SKATES Edward R. Powell, Alexandria, 1nd.

Application March 11,

13 Claims.

This invention relates to a disk wheel and mounting therefor suitable for roller skates and the like.

It relates particularly to a disk wheel so disposed as to permit its use on relatively rough surfaces such as concrete and asphalt side walks without excessive road friction and vibration. While roller skates have been in use for many years, their value has been generally limited to conditions where the floors are specially suitable for them. Their merit on side walks is greatly limited by the shock of the small wheels encountering the irregularities of the side walk surface. Numerous designs have been proposed for using larger wheels but these have been generally unsatisfactory. They have raised the foot too far from the ground or have provided support in unnatural places or have been too cumbersome. The advantages of this invention 22 are that it provides a large-diametered disk-like wheel which operates in a small clearance, gives a light, compact but resilient structure and a rolling action equivalent to a wheel of comparatively'large diameter.

The object of the invention is, then, to provide a disk wheel which embodies these advantages and is economical to manufacture and is suitable for general use on reasonably smooth side walks, or other hard substantially horizontal surface.

The full nature of the invention will be understood readily from the accompanying drawing and the following description and claims:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of two disk wheels as applied to a roller skate.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged section taken 'in plane 2-2 of Fig. 1 and in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view similar to Fig. 2 and of a part of a wheel and mounting therefor.

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic illustration of a large radius wheel of the invention applied to a surface crack, dotted lines indicating a standard roller skate wheel associated therewith.

A complete structure which embodies the invention is shown in Figs. 1 and 2. v The skate is provided with two obliquely disposed disk wheels 11, each of which supports the foot plate 12 by means of brackets 13, cups 14, ball races 16 and 1'1 and screw-bolts 15. The foot plate isprovided with clamps 19, clamp screw 20, heel stop 2'7 and strap 28. The position of the shoe is shown in dotted lines. The pin 18 holds the screw-bolt in proper adjustment for clearances for both ball races.

The disk 11 is supported by the ball races and rotates freely in response to any forward or 1932, Serial No. 598,221

backward thrust on the device. The plane of rotation of the disk is shown at about 23 degrees with the ground and the foot plate. The disk 11 consists preferably of a single piece ,of pressed steel manufactured from sheet or strip steel and is preferably case hardened to lower the friction of the balls and provide additional stiffness and longer wear.

To avoid any considerable multiplication of the load stresses on the bearings, the amount of the overhang (distance 37) is made small compared with the resistance leverage (distance 38) of the bearings. The annular portion 11, the space defined by dimension 37 and the surface. 30 in Fig. 2 constitute the overhung tread portion as used in the claims. In the present form of the device, the average overhang is less than the resistance leverage. The design of bearings is such that the wheel is held rigidly in a definite plane of rotation and will rotate freely even when subjected to an overhung load.

The structure illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 employs a wheel of about 4% .inches in diameter so disposed as to have an arc of contact with the ground equal to about a nine inch diameter vertical wheel. With the aforesaid mounting of the wheels, the foot plate is positioned about 1% inches above the ground or supporting surface. The disk 11 has a tread portion 30 which is slightly crowned to minimize sliding action in contact.- ing the floor and give the foot freedom of motionbut keeps the support well under the center of the foot, see Fig. 2. The slightly overhung arrangement gives resiliency to the structure and eliminates the necessity for-springs or cushions. The cup 14 and screw 15 are preferably hardened where they contact the balls. The bracket 13 is riveted or spot welded to plate 12 and to cup 14.

The advantage of this invention can be seen more clearly by reference to Fig. 4. The surface 31 has a depression, crack or groove 32. A roller skate wheel of conventional size is indicated by dotted circle 23. The relative arc of contact which may be obtained by the use of this invention is indicated by line 24. The difference in the amount of deflection from the level of surface 31 is shown'at 25. This deflection governs the amount of shock and road friction.

The modified form of structure shown in Fig. 3 includes a disk 20 which has a shaft portion 33. The shaft is rotatably supported by ball races 22 and 23 and is held in place by nut 24. The ball races are carried by bracket 21 which has cupshaped portions 34 and 35. The bracket supports plate 36. This device is intended to moveeasily within a relatively small clearance and not only may be included in a skate but in other devices such as a crawler (used in garages) or a scooter (used as a. toy).

The foregoing examples of application are merely illustrative of the invention and should not be taken in a limiting sense. In general, the invention includes an obliquely disposed wheel used so as to increase its effective are of contact with the surface on which it rolls but obtaining therewith low ground clearance. Ball bearings are shown but any anti-friction bearings which maintain the alignment of the wheel and will carry an overhung load will serve.

The plate 12 and brackets 13 are merely loadcarrying members and, of course permit of wide variation in their design.

The invention claimed is:

1. A wheel adapted to roll on a surface, load carrying members associated therewith, bearing means contacting the wheel and supporting the load carrying members, the bearing means holding the wheel rotatably at an angle of less than 45 degrees with the surface on which it rolls.

2. A load carrying member, bearings carried in spaced relation thereto, a wheel rotatably supported on said bearings and adapted to roll on a surface, the wheel having a tread portion adapted to contact the surface normally at an angle of less than 45 degrees with the plane of rotation of the wheel.

3. A wheel adapted to roll on a surface, bearing means contacting said wheel, foot-supporting members carried from said bearings, the bearings being characterized by anti-friction elements and being adapted to support the wheel normally at an angle of less than 45 degrees with the surface on which it rolls.

4. A wheel adapted to roll on a surface, bearings contacting the wheel, load carrying members supported from said bearings, the bearings being characterized by relatively frictionless resistance to change in the plane of rotation of the wheel, and being adapted to support the wheel rotatably at an angle of less than 45 degrees with the surface on which it rolls.

5. A wheel mounted on anti-friction bearing means and adapted to rotate at an angle of less than 45 degrees with the horizontal, to roll on a substantially horizontal surface, to contact the surface in a tread portion slightly crowned and tangent to the surface at an angle of less than 45 degrees with the plane of rotation of the wheel.

6. A device of the class described which comprises a wheel, bearings therefor, a substantially horizontal plate carried on said bearings adapted to support a load, said wheel being disposed at an angle of less than 45 degrees with the plate.

'7. A device of the class described which comprises a wheel, bearings therefor, a normally horizontal plate-like member adapted to carry a load, thewheel being rotatable in a plane at less than 45 degrees with the plate and having a tread portion adapted to contact a substantially horizontal surface.

8. A disk-wheel skate which includes a wheel, bearings therefor, a normally horizontally disposed plate-like member, the wheel being rotatable in a plane of less than 45 degrees with the plate-like member and having a tread portion in over-hung relation to the bearings, thebearings having relatively large and frictionless resistance to change in plane of rotation of said wheel.

9. A dislpwheel device for a skate including a foot supporting member, a wheel located mainly below said member and supported in a plane 'oblique to that of said member, the wheel having a crowned tread portion and being substan tially greater in diameter than the distance from said tread portion to said member.

10. A disk wheel device for a skate including an obliquely disposed wheel of substantially pressed sheet formation, said wheel having an overhung tread portion adapted to contact the ground formed in the side thereof and being adapted to coact with a plurality of rolling antifriction elements which are adapted to maintain its alignment.

11. An obliquely disposed wheel device for a skate including a wheel of substantially unitary pressed sheet formation, said wheel being adapted to contact the ground on one lateral surface thereof and adapted to coact with rolling antifriction elements on the opposite lateral surface thereof.

12. An obliquely disposed wheel device for a skate including a wheel of substantially pressed sheet formation, said wheel having a tread portion formed on one lateral surface thereof, and

a load transmitting opposite lateral surface.

13. An obliquely disposed wheel device including a wheel of substantially pressed sheet formation, the wheel having an overhung tread portion formed in one side surface thereof, the wheel being supported on bearings, the amount of the average overhang, being less than the resistance leverage of the bearings.

EDWARD a. POWELL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2589847 *Jun 23, 1949Mar 18, 1952Faultless Caster CorpCaster
US2617688 *Mar 22, 1948Nov 11, 1952Herbert A LeeSkate roller assembly
US2631328 *May 18, 1949Mar 17, 1953Bassick CoCaster
US2855211 *Mar 22, 1956Oct 7, 1958Castle Alfred BDolly
US2909377 *Oct 12, 1956Oct 20, 1959Yale & Towne Mfg CoStabilizer for industrial trucks
US2933874 *Dec 17, 1956Apr 26, 1960Toro Mfg CorpFront castored mower
US3243194 *Apr 1, 1964Mar 29, 1966Clark Equipment CoEntry wheel arrangement for pallet truck
US3749416 *Feb 3, 1971Jul 31, 1973Skf Ind Trading & DevWheel support for an engine propelled road vehicle
US3757883 *Feb 3, 1971Sep 11, 1973Skf NvWheel support for an engine propelled road vehicle
US3767221 *Feb 3, 1971Oct 23, 1973Skf IndWheel support for a non-driven wheel of an engine propelled road vehicle
US4598918 *Apr 5, 1985Jul 8, 1986Rodriquez Jose ARoller disc assembly and skate
US4768793 *Aug 31, 1987Sep 6, 1988Spencer David WRoller ski construction
US4928982 *Mar 18, 1988May 29, 1990Logan Kenneth CConvertible running shoes/roller skates
US5303940 *Sep 8, 1992Apr 19, 1994Jeannette L. BrandnerSkate having angularly mounted wheels
US5346231 *Jan 27, 1993Sep 13, 1994Diana HoSkate construction with pre-set buffering, shock-absorbing and the topography compliance functions
US5566957 *Jul 18, 1995Oct 22, 1996Monotype Supply Co., Ltd.In-line roller skate having adjustable biasing angle for each individual wheel
US5951028 *Jul 28, 1997Sep 14, 1999Land Roller, Inc.Roller skate
US6003882 *Nov 14, 1996Dec 21, 1999V-Formation, Inc.Customizable skate with removable wheel hangers
US6273437 *Jul 10, 1999Aug 14, 2001Land Roller, Inc.Roller skate
US6406038Aug 14, 2001Jun 18, 2002Heeling Sports LimitedHeeling apparatus and method
US6443464 *Aug 9, 2001Sep 3, 2002Land Roller, Inc.Roller skate
US6450509Mar 31, 2000Sep 17, 2002Heeling Sports LimitedHeeling apparatus and method
US6698769Feb 3, 2003Mar 2, 2004Heeling Sports LimitedMulti-wheel heeling apparatus
US6739602Feb 7, 2002May 25, 2004Heeling Sports LimitedHeeling apparatus and method
US6746026Feb 15, 2002Jun 8, 2004Heeling Sports LimitedHeeling apparatus and method
US6845990 *Nov 19, 2002Jan 25, 2005Pc-Vane Sportartikel GmbhIn-line skate
US6926289Apr 5, 2002Aug 9, 2005Guohua WangMultifunctional shoes for walking and skating with single roller
US6979003Jun 7, 2004Dec 27, 2005Heeling Sports LimitedHeeling apparatus and method
US7063336Feb 18, 2003Jun 20, 2006Heeling Sports LimitedExternal wheeled heeling apparatus and method
US7165773Dec 22, 2005Jan 23, 2007Heeling Sports LimitedHeeling apparatus and method
US7165774Jun 19, 2006Jan 23, 2007Heeling Sports LimitedExternal wheeled heeling apparatus and method
US7610972Aug 4, 2005Nov 3, 2009Heeling Sports LimitedMotorized transportation apparatus and method
US7621540Jan 22, 2007Nov 24, 2009Heeling Sports LimitedHeeling apparatus and method
US8480095Nov 23, 2009Jul 9, 2013Heeling Sports LimitedHeeling apparatus wheel assembly
EP1541202A1 *May 9, 2003Jun 15, 2005Mitetsu SanoRoller skate
WO1998020945A1 *Nov 15, 1996May 22, 1998Formation Inc VSkate with angularly mounted wheels
WO1999004871A1 *Jul 24, 1998Feb 4, 1999Bert LovittRoller skate
WO2003097188A1 *May 9, 2003Nov 27, 2003Mitetsu SanoRoller skate
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/11.27, 301/5.7, 16/18.00A, 280/80.1, 16/46, 301/5.301
International ClassificationA63C17/22
Cooperative ClassificationA63C17/0066, A63C17/06, A63C17/22
European ClassificationA63C17/00L, A63C17/22, A63C17/06