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Publication numberUS1977995 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1934
Filing dateMar 15, 1934
Priority dateMar 15, 1934
Publication numberUS 1977995 A, US 1977995A, US-A-1977995, US1977995 A, US1977995A
InventorsMorali Charles
Original AssigneeMorali Charles
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe ornamentation
US 1977995 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 23, 1934.

C. MORALI SHOE ORNAMENTAT ION Filed March 15, 1954v INVENTOR CHARLES MORALl.

AT TORN EY Patented Oct. 23, 1934 Charles Morali, Forest Hills, N. Y.

ApplicationMarch 15, 1934, Serial No. 715,594"

7 Claims.

5 the ornamentation used is of the greatest importance from the standpoint of appearance and saleability of the product. I have found, that shoes carrying ornamentations consisting of bright stone and glass members, are highly desirable; but heretofore great difficulty and expense has been experienced in satisfactorily mounting such ornamental members. Trouble has been experienced also due to breaking of these members after attachment and due to the loss of ornaments when the shoe is worn.

It is therefore an object of this invention: to improve the ornamenting of shoes by providing a cheap and secure method of attaching ornaments such as rhinestones to shoe parts. I

And it is a further object of this invention to provide a new and highly effective ornament for shoes, which has a relatively large surface, of a colored glass which acts as a mirror. And finally it is an object of this invention gen.- erally to improve the art of ornamenting shoes, whereby greatly to enhance the appearance thereof and to produce highly stylish and desirable ornamental effects.

These andother objects of the invention will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art from the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which: Figure 1 is a plan view of one of my ornamental devices.

Figure 2 is a side elevation of a glass member used. I

Figure 3 is a transverse section of the device shown in Fig. 1. s

Figure 4 is a detail view of the base upon which .40 rhinestone ornaments are mounted for attachment. to a shoe.

Figure 5 is a section on 55 of Figure 4. Figure 6 is a plan View of a band of rhinestone ornaments mounted for attachment to a shoe.

is provided with ornamental stones such as mirror stone ornaments 20 and rhinestone ornaments 30. As shown, the rhinestones are applied to 515 the heel 11, the edge of the sole 12 and the straps Figure 7 is a section on the line 7-7 of Fig 14, in a manner hereinafter more fully described. In combination with the rhinestones, I attach to the straps 15 of the shoe mirror stones, hereinafter more fully described. I also use in connection with many styles and effects, the mirror stones alone or the rhinestones alone Insofar as I am aware, I am the first to apply these small mirrors to shoes as herein disclosed. The result is remarkably .efiective from the standpoint of ornamentation, for the many mirror surfaces in varying colors, through the reflection of color therefrom render the shoe extremely brilliant and colorful.- One of the outstanding desirable effects resulting from the use of the mirror stones resides in the novelty of a shoe which whenworn, giving off beams of reflected colored light. This greatly enhances the appearance of the shoe, for

it diifers in appearance very substantially from the effect produced by rhinestones.

I shall now describe in detailthe structure of the mirror stones themselves. The mirror stone 20 is seen to comprise a flat disc 21 of colored glass in the shape of a truncated cone. The colors most widely used are emerald green, bright red, gold, blue, etc. The base 22 of thediscis silvered as at 23 to render the same reflecting. A mounting for the disc is formed of any light workable metal such as tin, aluminum and the like, and consists of an engaging rim 25 carried by a base 26 provided with holes 27, by means of 35 which the stone may be sewed to the surface of a shoe. The rim 25 frictionally engages the sides of the disc 21 and holds the disc in place against a shoulder 28 at the junction of the rim 25 and the base 26.

To attach the stone to the shoe, it is merely necessary to sew the same to the surface desired to be ornamented, the threads passing through the holes 27.

Referring now specifically to Figures 4-8 the method of attaching the rhinestones will be described indetail.

A filler stripn31 of the desired width made of any suitable cheap fabric, for example a cheap cottoin tape, is covered withupper leather 32, such as gold or silver colored kid-skin, for example. The ends 32a of the leather are cemented to one face of the strip 31. A folded strip 33 of a material such as satin, silk crepe, or the like is now prepared, of a width slightly less than the width of the leather strip 32. Suitably colored rhinestones, at desirably spaced intervals, are mounted on the strip 33 by any of the well known rhinestone attaching machines now on the market. The holding prongs of the rhinestones pass 110 through the strip 33 and clench the stones firmly against the same. The strip 33, with the stones mounted therein, is now pasted over the ends 32a and lines of stitches 34, are passed through 33, 32, and 31 lengthwise thereof and very close to the prongs of the rhinestones. It will be observed that the lines of stitches 34 are practically in contact with the prongs of the rhinestone members, so close I am able to stitch in practice, without breaking either the stones or the needle of the sewing machine. Under the prior art practice it has been impossible to get this result. I have found that such close stitching can be realized only when following my method, as described above, of attaching the rhinestones.

The bands of rhinestones thus prepared may be used as straps in the making of sandals as shown in Figure 8, or alternatively these bands may be sewed onto any suitable surface of a shoe.

It will be understood of course, that the foregoing method of ornamentation lends itself to many varied adaptations to produce ornamental effects. For example, the color schemes employed, the character, and color of materials used, and 'the relative arrangement of the ornamental devices, as well as their shapes and sizes may be varied widely from the herein disclosed specific embodiment without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention. I, therefore, do not intend 'to be limited in the scope of my invention except as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United'States: I

1. A shoe having a heel, sole, and upper, and a pluralityof metal mountings having colored glass members therein secured to said upper, each of said members having a top and a bottom flat face in parallel relation, said bottom face being s'ilvered whereby to produce a reflecting surface.

'2. A s'h'oe'having a heel, sole, and upper, and a plurality of metal mountings having glass members therein secured to said upper, each of said members having a top and a bottom flat face in parallel relation, said bottom face being silvered whereby to produce a reflecting surface.

3. The method of ornamenting a shoe having an upper which comprises preparing a strip of leather to harmonize with said upper, preparing a strip of silk of a width less than said first mentioned strip, inserting rhinestones in said last mentioned strip, cementing said strips together, stitching said strips together by lines of stitches in close proximity to said rhinestones, and mounting said assembled strips and stones upon the said upper.

4. The method of ornamenting a shoe having an upper which comprises preparing a strip of leather to harmonize with the said upper, preparing a strip of silk of a width less than said first mentioned strip, inserting rhinestones in said last mentioned strip, cementing said strips together, stitching said strips together by lines of stitches in close proximity to said rhinestones, mounting said assembled strips and stones upon the said upper, mounting additional strips upon said upper, and attaching mirrors to said last mentioned strips.

'5. A shoe having a heel, sole, and upper, said upper comprising a plurality of straps, and a plurality of closely spaced ornamental stones secured longitudinally of said straps and covering a substantial portion of the outer surfaces of the latter, said straps carrying mounting members secured thereto and said stones secured to said mounting members, the assembly of said straps and stones being flexible whereby to conform to the foot of the wearer.

6. A shoe having a heel, sole, and upper, said upper comprising a plurality of narrow straps constituted by flexible strips carrying mounting members attached thereto and ornamental stones,

secured -to said mounting members.

7. A shoe having a heel, sole, and upper, said T1 upper carrying metal mountings having perforations,'stitching passing through said perforations securing said mountings to the upper, and a flat mirror stone secured in each of said mountings. CHARLES MORALI.

fill

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4026047 *Jul 30, 1976May 31, 1977Ahmer Joseph CDecorative device for converting street shoes to dress shoes
US4642910 *Apr 11, 1986Feb 17, 1987Carter Jr Nathan BBoot with detachable spur
US4837960 *Aug 15, 1988Jun 13, 1989Kaepa, Inc.Article with identifying device
US6499857 *Jun 23, 2000Dec 31, 2002Adele LumleyLighted clothing accessories
US6802140Mar 4, 2003Oct 12, 2004Lisa Margaret AslanidesShoe and method for decorating
US7328528Nov 24, 2004Feb 12, 2008Holly CaminitiRemovably attachable decoration for footwear
US8176658 *Feb 10, 2009May 15, 2012Marcella Miriam KatzWomen'S shoes, including sandals, with interchangeable fashion inserts
US20100199521 *Feb 10, 2009Aug 12, 2010Marcella Miriam KatzInsert array shoes, sandals and detachable showcases
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/11.5, 40/583, D10/111, 12/142.00R, 36/136
International ClassificationA43B23/24
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/0078, A43B23/24
European ClassificationA43B3/00S80, A43B23/24
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 25, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: XCAPER INDUSTRIES, LLC, CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:XCAPER INDUSTRIES, LLC;REEL/FRAME:016059/0480
Effective date: 20050523