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Publication numberUS1978507 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 30, 1934
Filing dateMar 20, 1933
Priority dateMar 20, 1933
Publication numberUS 1978507 A, US 1978507A, US-A-1978507, US1978507 A, US1978507A
InventorsHenry J Rand
Original AssigneeHenry J Rand
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple check valve
US 1978507 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 30, 1934. H. .lA RAND 1,978,507

MULTIPLE CHECK VALVE Filed March 20, 1955 INVENTORS,

; x BY ,f u. 40 f M Y 5 W7 ATTORNEYS. l

Patented Oct. 30, 1934 N UNITED i STATES PATENT ori-ICE Henry J. Rand, Kansas City, Kans. Application Maren 2o, 1933, serial No. 661,744

This invention relates toplumbing systemsfor buildings vwherein is incorporated an air intake vent, and the primary object of the invention is to provide `a check valvethat will permit taking '1 H f5 air from -exteriorly `of the building, whereby to supplyfthe system when vacuums or suctions are created therein for periodically using the plumbing system for the'removal of waste from within the building.

One of the important aims of the instantinvention is the contemplation of a multiple check valve usable as aforementionedfand constructed to permit vthe introduction ofy air fromwithin thebuilding `to the plumbingsystem, and yet to 15 preclude .the escape of objectionable, obnoxious gases from the plumbing system into the building.

Another object of this invention is to provide a` combination of parts within a plumbing system thatwill allow the effective use of the check valve 3;, 20 forming the major part of this inventionwith specially i formed building walls and plumbing ixtures, all of which are assembled in a manner toallow disposing an intake airvent .withinthe building to overcome hereinafter mentioned objections with respect to exterior vents.

A yet further object` of the invention is the .provision of a valve of the character mentioned; wherein is formed a plurality vof chambers, said chambers Abeing of diiferent size of capacity and V 'divided from each other by movablevalve heads, normally held closedby the action of gravity, which heads will` require forces of different intensities to withdrawthem from their closed position. i

`3:35` `Under ordinary conditions, and as a result of 45:vthe1waste material flows therefrom through the maintsewer pipe of theibuilding. i

It, therefore, becomes desirable to providewithin kthe `buildingyaxvent. ywhich will be protected :against suohfclogging Aand which will takek aii into, the` systemN from within the building...v This ,desirability is qualifiedby the objection thatswith checkl valves heretofore employed, obnoxious Ygases-have escaped from the plumbing system Ainto the building and likewise,A germs findtheir u .55-wayrfrom thesystem intogthe building; both of 7 claims.' (oi. 4-211) y which must positively be thoroughly overcome before a plumbing system having an interior vent and check valve risesV to a point where it will be approved by health authorities or will be satisfactory to the building occupant.

The aforementioned broad objects of this invention and the minor objects thereof which will appear during the course of the following specification, when fulfilled by suitable structure, will be capable of teaching the construction and installation of a multiple check valve that will overcome'the objections to interior vents, as just set forth.

The preferred form of this invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, wherein:

Figure 1 is a sectional View through a catch basin and a portion of a hollow building wall, illustrating a fragment of a plumbing system and the vent thereof that is equipped with a Valve embodying this invention.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, longitudinal, centralY section through the valve. Fig. 3 is a cross section taken on line III-III of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is an end elevation of the valve.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary, sectional View showing the valve in position.

Fig. 6 is an end elevation of the valve illustrated in Fig. 5, and, Fig. 7 is a longitudinal, central section through the multiple section valve illustrating the angular relation between apertured partitions therein.

Fig. 1 illustrates one manner of bringing together parts of a plumbing system so that the valve contemplated might be positioned within a hollow wall l0 having an opening 12 formed through one side thereof which communicates with the space 14 formed-behind a splash apron 16 that forms a part of catch basin 18 that, in turn, is connected with a part of the `plumbing 95 system 20 by branch 22. Vent pipe '24 extends upwardly within the space formed by wall 10 to a point adjacent opening 12 where `the multiple check valve 2,6 is secured in place. When so positioned, this check valve will draw air from 100 within the building along a path indicated by the arrows in Fig.'1, and the aforementioned objectswill thereby be fully "met,

Fig. 5 illustrates another mannerin which this check valve might be incorporated in a plumbing 105 system. In this instance wall 28 supports check valve 25 andmember 30 creates va finished appearance at the point .where valve 26 passes through wall `28 and joins afpart of theV plumbing system by way of Vent pipe 24. Y

With respect to the specific structure of valve 26 per se, it is important that the same be made up of a plurality of sections 32, each cylindrical and divided by a transverse partition 34 which intersects the longitudinal axis of the section 32 at an angle, as illustrates in Figs. 2 and '7. Sections 32 are in screw-threaded relation as shown at 36, and one of these sections 38 is modified so that it will support perforated screen 40, having radially extending slots 42, whereby diametrical contraction might take place when screen 40 is pressed to position within the confines of annular shoulder 44, formed by sectionv 38.

As illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7, screen 40 has an inturned, annular flange 46 for the purpose of securely gripping shoulder 44. Each partition 34 has an aperture 48 formed therethrough that is covered, when the valve is closed, by a swingable valve head 50 that rests upon partie tion 34 which serves as a seat for head 50. The manner in which valve head 50 is swingably mounted within its section 32 of case 26 is clearly shown in Figs. 2, 3rand 7, and the mounting might be effected throughthe use of opposed bosses 52 formed integrally with the body of section 32, through which is passed a pivot pin 54 that swingably supports link 56 between bosses 52. The free end of link 56 engages projection 58 formed on head 5 0 and nut 60 precludes displacement of these parts.

As shown in Fig. 2, line 56 has an opening 62 therethrough to receive member 58 that is substantially larger in diameter than the member itself, and nut 60 does not move tightly against link 56, all for the purpose of creating a looseness of t so that seating of valve head 50 might be eiective and not retarded by binding parts.

Manifestly, these valve heads 50 are maintained in the closed or seated position by the action of gravity, and to positively seal the valve against the escape of gases from the plumbing system or the escape of germs therefrom into the building, there is provided a plurality of valve structures as just described, all of `which must be opened before fresh air is drawn into the plumbing system.

Each of the plurality of partitions and valve heads 34 and 50 respectively is disposed at an angle `different from that of the other similar parts of the valve and the angularity of the valve head and partition closest to the point of connection with Vent pipe 24 should be greater in order that more force is required to draw the same to the open position. lWhen this is accomplished, the air from within chamber 64 will evacuate into the plumbing system in an effort to overcome the vacuum that has been created therein by the passage therethrough of a quantity ror waste. Obviously,4 the vacuum or suction set up will be sufficient to draw the next succeeding valve open and evacuate chamber 66 and again this same action will be repeated so that the last valve will be opened and air at atmospheric pressure will be drawn into the system by passing through all of the apertured partitions 34. Obviously, as the angle is -decreased from true vertical: it will be easierfor the valve heads 50 to be drawn open and this angle approaches the vertical` as the screened end of valve 26 is approached.

When sufficient air has been drawn into the system to overcome the vacuum therein, gravity will draw heads 50 closed and a multiple seal will be established to fulfillthe primary requirement of such a valve and to meet the broader concepts of this invention.

This valve and its parts might be constructed of metal or other suitable substance and the connection between sections of the case might be effected through other mediums than those illustrated. The relation between the angled valves, the size of the chamber formed therebetween, and the suction created within the plumbing system is of great importance and a valve made to embody the features of this invention will fulfill the duty or establishing proper combination in order that a perfect seal against escaping of objectionable gases Aand other contamination will always be established when sufficient suction within vent pipe 2 4 is no t present to hold all of the plurality of heads 50 in an open position.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. In a plumbing system having an interior air intake vent, a multiple check valve allowing air to enter the system and to preclude the escape of gases from the system comprising a case; a plurality of spaced-apart valve seats formed in series within the case; and a swingable valve head for each seat respectively, said heads being maintained against their seats by the action of gravity.

2. In a plumbing system having an interior air intake vent, a multiple check valve allowing air to enter the system and to preclude the escape of gases from the system comprising a case; a plurality of spaced-apart valve seats formed within the case; and a swingable valve head for each seat respectively, said valve seats being disposed 110 at diirerent angles and the heads being maintained against their respective seats by the action of gravity, all the heads and associated parts swingable therewith being substantially the same weight whereby the force required to lift one of `115 said valve heads is different than that required to lift any of the others.

3. In a plumbing system having an interior air intake vent, a multiple check Valve allowing air to enter the system and to preclude the escape of 120 gases from the system comprising a case; a plurality of spaced-apart valve seats formed within the case; and a swingable valve head for each seat respectively, said valve seats and valve heads being disposed at different angles to form chambers of .125 different capacities within the valve case.

4. In a plumbing system having an interior air intake vent, a multiple check valve allowing air to enter the system and to preclude the escape of gases from the system comprising a case; a plurality of spaced-apart valve seats formed within the case; and a swingable valve head for each seat respectively, said case comprising a plurality of sections in screw-threaded engagement each having a valve seat and a valve head therein, the e said seats and heads of the valve being at different angles with the heads maintained in closed posi-'- tion by the action of gravity.

5. In a plumbing system for buildings, an interior intake vent, and a catch basin connected for drainage by said system and having a splash apron` spaced .from the wall of the building, a multiple checkvalve allowing air to enter the system and to preclude the escape of gases from the system, positioned to draw air from within the;A building at a point behind 'the' said splash apron.

6. In a plumbing system for buildings, an interior intake vent and a catch basin connected for drainage byv said system and having a splash apron spaced from the hollow wall of the building wherein is formed an opening interconnecting the space within the hollow wall and the space behind said splash apron, a check valve allowing air to enter the system and to preclude the escape of gases from the system, positioned within the hollow wall at a point adjacent the opening formed in the said wall whereby to draw air from the interior of the building by way of said opening and space behind the said splash apron.

7. A valve of the character described comprising a case having a plurality of longitudinally aligned hollow, cylindrical sections; a transverse partition within each of said sections having an HENRY J. RAND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2461392 *Mar 3, 1947Feb 8, 1949Parry Edward CAutomatic vent
US3155107 *Feb 3, 1960Nov 3, 1964Joseph C WoodfordVacuum breaker
US4867802 *Jun 23, 1988Sep 19, 1989Earl Raymond FAir admittance valve for use in drainage systems
US4917147 *Jun 21, 1989Apr 17, 1990Jerkins Kenneth RBackwater escape valve
US4962548 *Sep 7, 1988Oct 16, 1990G.I. Marketing CCValve assembly
US5226441 *Mar 9, 1992Jul 13, 1993Cmb IndustriesBackflow preventor with adjustable outflow direction
US7025092 *Sep 4, 2002Apr 11, 2006Studor S.A.Positive air pressure attenuation device for drainage systems
DE10304364A1 *Feb 4, 2003Aug 12, 2004J. Eberspächer GmbH & Co. KGDrosselanordnung sowie Abgasanlage mit einer derartigen Drosselanordnung
WO1993018326A1 *Mar 5, 1993Sep 16, 1993Cmb IndBackflow preventor with adjustable outflow direction
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/211, 4/209.0FF, 137/512
International ClassificationE03C1/10
Cooperative ClassificationE03C1/106, E03C1/10
European ClassificationE03C1/10C, E03C1/10