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Publication numberUS1979797 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1934
Filing dateDec 5, 1930
Priority dateDec 5, 1930
Publication numberUS 1979797 A, US 1979797A, US-A-1979797, US1979797 A, US1979797A
InventorsFinnell Walter S
Original AssigneeFinnell Walter S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor machine
US 1979797 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 6, 1934. I w. s. FINNELL. 1,979,797

FLOdR MKGH'INE 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 5, 1950 Nov. 6, 1934. w 5 HNNELL 1,979,791

FLOOR MACHINE Filed Dec. 5. 1930 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 24 Gil-6 ,ZiU/ZRZ OW flmim Nov. 6, 1934.

w. s FINNELL FLOOR MACHINE Filed Dec. 5.. 1930 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Nov. 6,1934. W.S.FINNELL, 1,979,797

FLOOR MACHINE Filed Deb. 5. 1930 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 v M I Nov. 6, 1934. w. s. FINNELL 1,979,797

FLOOR MACHINE Filed Dec. 5. 1930 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Nov. 6, W34. w. s. FINNELL FLOOR'MACHINE Filed Dec. 5. 1 930 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Patented Nov. 6, 1934 My invention relates to floor treating machines and has to do particularly with a combined scrubbing and mopping machine.

One of the objects of my invention is to provide an improved machine of this character which automatically accomplishes the scrubbing and mopping operations simultaneously with maximum efficiency as the machine is propelled along the floor by the operator.

Another object is to provide such a machine which is exceedingly simple in construction; comparatively cheap to manufacture; easily handled by unskilled labor; and which is exceedingly rapid in its scrubbing and mopping operations whereby large floor surfaces may be thoroughly cleaned in a once-over operation in much less time than possible with devices heretofore employed thereby materially reducing the cost of building maintenance, labor, materials, etc.

A further object is to provide a machine adapted for both scrubbing and mopping operations which is sturdy, durable and long-lived under constant use conditions.

An additional object is to provide a machine of this character which may be readily converted from a combined scrubbing and mopping machine to merely a scrubbing machine.

Another object is to provide a combined machine Which includes vacuum mopping means cooperating with a floor-contacting squeegee adapted to mop the floor as the scrubbing operation is carried on, without streaking, smearing, etc, so that in going over the floor once, it is completely scrubbed and mopped, requiring no further attention.

A further object is to provide a combined machine which embodies but few parts all of which are readily accessible, and wherein the soil, water, etc. mopped or collected from the floor can be readily and quickly emptied from the machine without interruption of the scrubbing and mopping operations, the receiving receptacle which the soil finally reaches being separately removable without interfering with the mopping functions of the machine.

Another and more specific object is to provide an adjustable squeegee structure which may be moved to and held in various positions with respect to the floor surface, novel squeegee supporting means being provided to this end which may be readily actuated and adjusted by unskilled labor to the end that highest cleaning efiiciency is obtained at all times.

Other objects are to provide means compensating for squeegee wear to insure proper mopping relation between the squeegee and floor surface at all times, including adjustable stabilizing means; to provide adjustable spout means for filling the cleaning fluid receptacle; to provide a novel frame arrangement for supporting the several parts for unison-operation; to provide novel means for covering and protecting the operating parts from water, dirt, etc.; and to improve details of construction in general.

Other objects and advantages will becomeap- 6o parent as this description progresses and by reference to the drawings in which,-

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of one'form of machine embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical section of the structure shown in Fig. 1, the forward part thereof being omitted; V

Fig. 3 is a bottom plan View of the machine shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken substantially on line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged sectional View taken substantially on line 5-5 of Fig. 3;-

Fig. 6 is a separated perspective view of the frame of the machine shown in Fig. 1; .5;

Fig. 7 is a detached perspective view of the front cover member;

Fig. 8 is a detached perspective view of the cover for the rear of the motor;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged perspective view, partially in section, of the lower frame members;

Fig. 10 is a separated perspective view of the squeegee, and its supporting mechanism;

Fig. 11 is an enlarged view of a portion of the structure of Fig. 10 showing the squeegee adjusting means;

Fig. 12 is an enlarged sectional view through the universal coupling structure between the brush-supporting head and the driving mechanism, taken substantially on line 12-12 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 18 is a sectional view taken substantially at right angles to the view of Fig. 12 through the coupling between the brush supporting head and the driving mechanism;

Fig. 1% is a section taken substantially on line 14-44 of Fig. 13; and

15 is a sectional view through a modified form of universal coupling which may be used between the brush supporting head and the driving mechanism.

Referring particularly to the structure which I have chosen to illustrate my invention, it comprises generally a frame unit; a scrubbing unit and a mopping unit. These units are assosupport slung transverse, U-shaped supporting bar 33 ciated together for cooperative operation to the end that a complete scrubbing and mopping operation may be accomplished with a once-over operation, or the mopping unit may be cut out of operation and the machine used for scrubbing purposes only.

Frame unit The frame (Figs. 1, 2 and 6) consists of a bottom U-shaped angle iron piece 20 having its horizontal leg 20 turned inwardly to serve as a sliding support for a removable soil receiving receptacle 21. A front, inverted U-shaped frame member 22 is supported by the bottom frame piece 20, which front frame piece supports an upright standard 23 carrying a swiveled cable guide 24 and pulleys 25, 25. The mid-portion of the upright frame piece 22 supports the forward end of a horizontal U-shaped frame member 26 having an inwardly-extending horizontal leg portion 26, securely supporting an L-shaped receptacle 2'7. The rear end portion of the frame piece 26 is supported by diagonal brace bars 28 (one on each side) having their ends secured, respectively, to the rear of the bottom frame piece 20 and the intermediate frame piece 26. Additional support is afforded the horizontal frame piece 26 by means of criss-cross strap members 29 connected at their lower ends to the opposite rear corners of the frame piece 26 and at their opposite upper ends to the handle members 30. These handles are supported by attachment at 31 to the brace bars 23 and at 32 with an under-carried support member 33 which will be referred to more particularly hereinafter.

At the top of the frame, there are two frame pieces 34 (one on each side) connected at their opposite ends at (34 and 34 to the front upright frame member 22 and the handles 30, respectively. These frame members 34 carry supports 35 in which the cable drum 36 is rotatably mounted for supporting the electric cord 37 in the usual manner. This electric cord is adapted as at 33 for connection to a source of power and is also connected through the double-acting switch 39 to the brush-driving motor 40 and vacuum motor 41.

The frame structure is supported, in part, by a pair of wheels 42 mounted by means of stub shafts 43 upon the supporting member 33, the latter taking the form of a U-shaped casting having upper horizontal flanges 33 (Figs. 5 and 9) secured by bolts 44, or other suitable means, to the horizontal legs 20 of the bottom frame piece 20. The base portion 33 of this support 33 is rearwardly-inclined and its U-legs 33' project forwardly for attachment as at 45 to a split band 46 which adjustably passes around and supports the casing of the motor 40 thereby affording, among other things, a support for the motor 40. Near the forward end of the arms 33 I provide an integral, underupon which the bars 47 at the rear of the motor casing is seated and secured by means of screw studs 48 (Figs. 2 and 3).

The frame structure and the parts carried thereby are rockable about the axes of the wheels 42, and the rear of the bottom frame member is provided. with short legs. 20 which support the rear of the machine when its forward end is tilted upwardly about the wheels.

and to tend to confine the same Scrubbing unit This unit generally includes the motor 40, gear housing 49, brush means 50 and receptacle 2'7 and suitable connections for operatively associating these parts. This structure is similar to that disclosed in my copending application, Serial No. 240,110, filed December 15, 1927, for Floor machines, except as will be more particularly pointed out hereinafter.

Specifically, I provide, preferably, two circular brush supports 51 (Figs. 1 and 3) which are rotated inwardly toward each other so as to tend to avoid throwing the scrubbing solution and loosen the soil outwardly from the machine, to the path of the rearwardly located squeegee 61. The mechanism for driving these brush supports includes the motor 40 having a drive shaft 40 extending forwardly and supporting a worm 62 adapted to mesh with the worm gears 63, 64 in the housing 49. Rotation of the motor shaft and worm causes rotation of the gears inwardly and toward each other as above referred to. Operatively connected to each of the gears and depending vertically therefrom is a drive stem 65 (Fig. 1) which is associated with the respective brush supports 51 by means of a universal drive connection which permits of Wabble and vertical adjustment of the brush support relative to the driving mechanism to compensate for variations in the floor surface.

Each brush support 51 (Figs. 12-14) is, preferably, of inverted cup-shape having a central opening therein, the walls of which opening are formed, in part,by down-turned edges 51 of the brush support material and by the separately secured cylindrical piece 53. To the downturned flange 51 I attach as at 51 a cylindrical concavo-convex driving boss 54 which is provided at intervals with openings 55. The flange 51 boss 54 and piece 53 form a central pocket in the brush structure to which the cleaning fluid is delivered from the outlet 56 of the conduit 56 leading to the receptacle 27. This fluid finds its way to the floor surface at the center of the brush structure through the openings 55.

The outer annular edge of the brush support 51 is turned downwardly and inwardly as at 57 (Fig. 1) and the brushes 58 have their heads complementally shaped to the down-turned edge flange 57 so that the springs 59 (Fig. 3) acting on their inner sides 60 tend to lock and hold the brushes 58 in place upon the brush sup port; but permitting ready detachment of such brushes by movement of the same away from the flange 57 toward the spring 59.

The universal drive structure which I have illustrated (one for each brush support) takes the form of a depending head 66 supported in any desired manner by the depending drive stem and having at its bottom edge a diametric, depending rectangularly-shaped tongue 67 which joins with the head part 66 by means of a tapered surface 68. This depending tongue 67 is secured somewhat loosely in the rectangularlyshaped slot 69 of the depending connector member 70 by means of a pin 71. With this arrangement, the connector member '70 is adapted to rock upon the tongue 67 on the axis of the pin '71, the tapered surface 68 of the head 66 permitting this to substantial extent. The head portion of the member '70 is provided with a narrow depending rectangularly-shaped tongue part 72 (at right angles to the tongue 6'7) which passes through a rectangularly-shaped opening 73 formed by cutting and turning the central wall portion of the drive boss member 5-: downwardly as best shown in Figs. 12 and 13. The slot opening 73 is of somewhat greater dimensions than the depending tongue 72 so that such tongue can rock therein and at right angles to the rocking motion permitted by the pin 71.

The tongue 72 is long enough for its lower end to project through and beyond the wall of the opening 73, and its projecting part is cut out centrally as at 74 forming at the lower end of said tongue inwardly-extending upwardly slanting retaining elements 75. The drive boss 54, to one side of the tongue 72, supports a U-shaped latch spring 80 by means of a retainer 76. This member 76 may be formed of sheet metal, or any other suitable material and has its midportion '76 depressed for attachment to the underside of the drive boss 54 by a bolt and nut 77. This member 76 is further provided with a forwardly-located upstanding flange 76 slotted as at 76 (Fig. 14), the free edge of which flange engages the underside of the drive boss 54 in spaced relation to the depressed portion 76 providing, when the member '76 is attached in place, an annular confining space 78 which receives and holds the looped head 79 of the spring member 80 (Figs. 1244). Spring arms S0 extend in slightly flaring directions from the looped head 79 of this member and the ends of these arms are turned back upon themselves as at 80 for ready grasping to move such together for detachment of the drive connections as will be obvious from the following description. he lower edges of the retainer elements are tapered to such an extent that the drive member 70 may be inserted through the opening 73 and engage with the locking spring without manual manipulation of this spring; that is to say, the spring arms 80 engage the tapered surfaces of the drive member causing the spring arms 80 to spring toward each other, and engaged behind the retainer elements 75.

When the parts are thus engaged, the tendency of the spring arm 80 to spring apart will hold the same behind the elements '75 and the brush support is locked to the drive mechanism. In the normal position of these parts, there is some clearance, vertically, as between the spring arms and the flanged metal forming the opening 73, whereby the brush head structure is adapted to adjust itself vertically with respect to the driving mechanism, in addition to the wabble adjusting movements. A washer 81 is disposed between the head of the member 76 and the upper surface of the drive boss 54 to avoid wear on these parts to material eX- tent.

In Fig. I have shown a modified form of univ-rsal connector structure. In this form, each depending drive stem 65 is screw-threadedly connected as at 82 to a connector member 83 which is loosely mounted in and held for rocking movement in a socket 84 in the member 85 by screw pins 86. The depending attachment tongue 85 of member 85 is of reduced width providing at the juncture of such t n ue and the body of the member 85 a shoul- 85 A spring 850 of larger diameter than the tongue 85 is disposed between the top of the brush support portion 54 and the shoulder 85 of member 85; and, if desired, it may be secured to such support in any suitable and well-known manner (not shown). Or, if desired, it may be secured to the shoulder 85 in position surrounding the tongue 85 in any suitable and well-known manner (not shown). Wherefore, when the tongue is inserted through the brush support opening 73 and locked in place by the spring arms 80, the spring 850 is confined, preferably, under slight compression between the brush support and the member 85. This spring arrangement tends to hold the brush supports normally in the same relative floor engaging positions. It also provides a cushion for the brush supports in their vertical adjustment movements, giving greater flexibility and uniformity in the brush adjustment actions. Other than described, the structure of the member 85 is the same as that of the member 70 and it is adapted to be engaged with the spring member 8a) in the manner above described. The connection between the members 83 and 85 affords the rocking movement of the parts in one direction while the connection between the member 85 and the drive boss 54 affords rocking motion in the opposite direction.

The operation of the structure so far described will be obvious. When the switch 39 is turned to a position for cutting in the scrubbing motor 40, the brush means 50 is rotated in contact with the floor. The gear housing which is, preferably, integral with the casing or housing for the motor 40 supports the brush means with at least part of the weight of the machine thereon. The receptacle 27 is adapted to contain a scrubbing solution or any other desired liquids for scrubbing, and, to increase its capacity, it is provided with a depending leg 2'7 (Fig. 2) seated upon the bottom frame member 20. The conduit 56 leading to the brush means is connected directly to this leg, and flow of the liquid through this conduit is controlled by a valve 58 actuated and adjusted by a rod-and-handle means 56.

Mapping unit The mopping parts of my mechanism are cooperatively associated structurally and functionally with the scrubbing structure. Specifically, referring particularly to Figs. 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10, the squeegee 61 is, preferably V-shaped having a span at least equal to, but preferably slightly beyond, the total span of the brush structure. This squeegee includes a v' shaped frame $1 and the similarly shaped rubber sec-- tions 61* one of which at least contacts directly with the floor surface to perform the mopping operation in the usual manner. This squeegee is supported by a U-shaped frame 87 (Fig. 10) which has its U-legs 8'? extending forwardly with their forward ends offset below their rear portions. The front ends of these logs 87 are pivotally secured as at 88 to the forward ends of the legs 33 of the support member 33. The squeegee frame 61 near its rear portion is pivotally connected at opposite sides to the squeegee support 87 by brackets 89 each having a vertical leg secured to the squeegee frame and an inwardly ofi'set vertical leg pivotally connected at 90 to the respective leg of the support 87. It will be noted that the squeegee pivotal support 96 is located approximately at the wheel axes whereby the squeegee 'is more readily maintained in a horizontal adjusted position with respect to the floor surface as the machine may tend to rock slightly about its wheel-support in its move- I ment along the floor surface; thereby maintaining the squeegee (once it has been adjusted) in a proper predetermined mopping position with respect to the floor surface.

For best operation, it is desirable that when the squeegee is in floor-engaging position, it be adjusted to and held in a predetermined horizontal position wherein it uniformly engages the floor surface throughout its entire floor-contasting area. It is also desirable to avoid tipping of the forward end of the squeegee so as to cause it to dig into the floor surface, causing excessive squeegee wear, improper mopping and requiring increased effort to move the machine along the floor. To maintain the squeegee in proper adjusted position I provide a stabilizing means which takes the form of an upward extension 89 on the bracket 89 which extension is projected forwardly over and above the adjacent leg 87 of the squeegee support. This extension 89 suports an adjusting screw 91 which has a screw-driver-shaped end adapted to engage a kerf 92 'in the adjacent up er edge portion of the support leg for preventing accidental adjustments of said screw. Obviously, the brackets 89, 89 are so located with respect to the center of the squeegee 61 that the forward end of the squeegee tends at all times to swing downwardly; but by positioning the adjusting screw 91 as just described, the down-swing tendency of the forward end of the squeegee is limited; whereby, upon adjustment of the screw 91, the squeegee 61 can be set and maintained in a predetermined operating relation to the floor surface.

My invention contemplates the provision of means for cutting in and out the mopping apparatus as desired. Among other things, to that end, I provide for adjustment of the squeegee support 8'7 as follows:

To each of the U-legs 87 of this support, and to the rear of the pivotal connection between said support and the squeegee, I provide vertical springs 93 connected at opposite ends to the support legs 87 and the adjacent upper portion of the supporting member 33 as at 94 (Figs. 2 and 5). These springs are of sufficient strength to tend at all times to move the support 87 upwardly about its pivotal mounting and to hold the squeegee out of engagement with the floor. To hold the squeegee downward in its floor-engaging position, I provide a latching member taking, preferably, the form of a bar of general U-shape pivotally supported as at 95 by a transverse anglebar member 96 carried by the lower frame member 20. This latch member extends downwardly from its hinge support, then rearwardly and diagonally upward and outward slightly beyond the rear of the machine. The depending hinged leg 97 of this latch member is provided with an adjustable latch element 98' having a threaded stem passing through a slot 97 in the portion 9'7 where it is screw-threadedly engaged by a thumb nut 99 for tightening and holding the same in adjusted position. The position of the latch element 98 may be changed to vary the extent of lowering or depression of the frame 8'7 and the squeegee 61 (to compensate for wear and for initial adjustment) by loosening the thumb nut 91 and sliding the latch element along the slot ed opening 97 (Fig. 9) in the bar to another position wherein the teeth of the latch element 98 engage the teeth 97 of the bar.

The latch member is constantly and yieldably pulled toward the rear of the machine by a spring 100 connected at one end to the base porby the motor 41.

tion of the latch member as at 101 (Fig. 2) and to the mid-portion of the U-base of the squeegee support 87 as at 102. With the spring 93 constantly pulling upwardly on the squeegee support 87 and with the spring 100 constantly pulling rearwardly on the latch member 9'1, depression of the rear end of the squeegee support 87 results in snapping of the cross bar 103 (carried by the support 87) beneath the latch element 98; and the action of the spring 100 is sufficient to releasably hold the squeegee support in this position wherein the squeegee is operatively engaged with the floor surface. When it is desired to release the squeegee and to raise the same from the floor surface, it is only necessary for one to place his foot on the rear projecting end portion 104 of the latch member depressing the same to move it away from the cross angle member 103 whereupon the springs 93 instantly move the squeegee support 87 upwardly. When this action takes place, unless guarded against, the squeegee 61 would be held in a position wherein its forward end is tipped downwardly, due to the action of the adjusting screw or stabilizing means 91. To avoid this condition and to maintain the squeegee substantially horizontal when in its raised position, I mount on the rear bend portion of the squeegee frame an upstanding spring bar stop member 105 having a forwardly bent end 105 As the squeegee is raised as above described, the stop end 105 projects un der and strikes the lower edge or" the support member base 33, stopping the upward movement of the rear end of the squeegee and causing the forward end of the squeegee to swing upwardly about its pivotal support to a position wherein the squeegee is in substantially horizontal position with respect to the floor surface.

The soil collected by the squeegee is removed from the floor surface by a vacuum-mopping arrangement of the general character disclosed in my co-pending application Serial No. 333,821, filed January 21, 1929, for Mopping machine, except in the particulars hereinafter pointed out. In general, this structure includes a receptacle 110 (Fig. 2) in which a partial vacuum is produced by means of an exhauster 111 driven The vacuum receptacle 110 is located, for space convenience, in the receptacle 27, and it is connected to the floor surface directly in front of the squeegee 61 by means of a conduit 112. The floor-end of the conduit 112 supports a nozzle 113 formed preferably of rubber and the lower end of the conduit 112 is so positioned that this nozzle is inclined forwardly with respect to the floor surface, the receiving end of the nozzle being diagonally cut to accommodate this position. The wall of the discharge end of this nozzle is notched or cut away as at 114 to insure at all times during operation a flow of air into the nozzle and through the conduit 112, setting up the necessary air-drag and airfriction condition at the nozzle inlet to cause flow of the soil (liquid, dirt, etc.) into the nozzle and through the conduit. I have found in practice that this flow condition is materially aided, to the extent that a predetermined proper soilflow is at all times insured, by an opening 115 (or there may be a plurality of such openings) located in the conduit 112 inwardly from the nozzle outlet approximately at the position shown in Fig. 2.

An automatic dump valve 116, controlled by the vacuum in the receptacle 110 and the weight of the soil therein, is provided for automatically discharging the soil at intervals from the receptacle 110 into the receptacle 21. It is desirable, for best operation, that the soil and air drawn into the receptacle 110 be separated and to that end I employ within the receptacle 110 a separator 117 (Fig. 2) which takes, preferably, the form disclosed in my said application Serial No. 333,821. In the event that soil, moisture, and the like, is drawn through the exhauster 111, the exhauster discharge is extended in nozzle-fashion as at 118 for discharging such soil, etc., into the receptacle 21.

As the level of the soil in the receptacle 21 is raised the float member 119 is raised and the position of the end 119 of this float member indicates to the operator the level of the soil in such receptacle. When it is desired to empty the receptacle 21, it may be slid rearwardly from the frame member 20 and the soil poured therefrom, or the valve 120 may be actuated, with the receptacle in the position on the machine, or otherwise, as will be well understood.

For convenience in filling the scrubbing receptacle 27, I provide an adjustable spout which is mounted in the opening 121 provided by the funnel-like member 122 supported in the forward top portion of the receptable 27. This adjustable spout takes the form of a trough-like body 123 having a hook-shaped outer end 123 adapted to hook over the forward edge of the receptacle in the lowered position of the spout. The under side of this spout is provided with an angled member 124 near its mid portion which, when the spout is lifted upwardly, is adapted to engage behind and over the forward portion of the receptacle 27 holding the outer end of the spout away from the machine in position to receive the liquid. To hold the spout in a most convenient pouring angle, the forward under portion of such spout is provided with a leg 126 which, when the spout is adjusted to its pouring position, seats upon the forwardly inclined wall 122 of the member 122 holding the spout properly inclined and insuring positive hook engagement between the forward wall of the receptacle and angle member 124. To limit the normal withdrawal movement of the spout 123, its forward end is provided with a hook member 125 which is adapted to hook over the wall portion 122" of the member 122 when the spout is withdrawn toward its normal liquid-receiving position. This hook member 126, however, does not prevent removal of the spout under conditions where the spout structure is moved to a sub- 11 stantially vertical position and withdrawn.

In the operation of this mopping structure, or when it is desired to mop simultaneously with the scrubbing operation, the squeegee support 87 is depressed to engage the squeegee 61 with the floor surface. The switch 39 is then actuated to out in the vacuum motor 49 as well as the scrubbing motor 40 whereby, as the machine is moved along the floor and soil is collected by the squeegee, such soil is drawn (by the vacuum condition setup in the receptacle 110) into the receptacle 110 and is eventually discharged into the receptacle 21. This action continues so long as the motor 41 is in operation. When it is desired to cut out the mopping apparatus, the

switch 39 is turned to its other position, cutting in only the scrubbing motor 40, and the end 104 of the latch member 97 is depressed to release the squeegee support permitting the springs 93 to elevate the same to the inoperative position.

Machines constructed in accordance with my 5 invention are generally used in environments where neat and cleanly appearance is highly desirable. To that end, I provide novel cover structure which, with the other parts abovedescribed, not only adds to the appearance of the machine but also protects the parts from dirt, liquids, etc., during operation. More particularly, referring to Figs. 1, 7 and 8, I employ a front cover plate having a vertically-disposed part 130 adapted to be disposed across the front of the frame members, and a bottom part 131 shaped similarly to the forwardly projecting part of the motor casing and the adjacent structure associated therewith. When this cover plate is mounted on the frame it assumes a position such as illustrated in Fig. 1, and it is detachably held in place as follows: Its part 130 is provided with right angled flanges 132 along its vertical edges and these flanges are provided with notches 133 into which the heads of frame bolts 134 are received. The upper ends of these flanges 132 support spring clips 135 which snapengage the adjacent part of the front frame piece 22.

The rear top and end portions of the motor 40 are protected by the semi-circular cover 136 shown in Figs. 2 and 8. This cover is held in place by spring clips 137 which snap-engage the motor-support strap 46.

From the foregoing, the objects and advantages ofmy invention as heretofore set forth will be apparent. A combined scrubbing and mopping machine is provided which is capable of completely treating the floor surface with a high degree of eiiiciency in a once-over operation of the apparatus. The structure is quite simple in operation and can be readily handled and adjusted by unskilled labor. By my invention, a considerable saving in the proper maintenance and treatment of floor surfaces, both large and small areas, is provided for.

Furthermore, while I have shown one general form of structure embodying my invention, it is to be understood that other changes in details and arrangements of parts may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention as defined by the claims which follow.

I claim:

1. In a machine of the character described, a frame including a pair of front, laterally-spaced upright pieces, a scrubbing means supported beneath said frame, and having a part projecting forwardly beyond said frame, means detachably securing said scrubbing means to said frame, and cover means including a cover member spanning said upright pieces and spring snaps carried by said member at its opposite sides adapted to snap-engage the respective said upright pieces, said member having a foot-portion extending forwardly and adapted to conceal a portion of said projecting part of said scrubbing means.

2. In a machine of the character described, a frame including a pair of front, laterally-spaced upright pieces having projections thereon, a scrubbing means supported beneath said frame, and having a part projecting forwardly beyond said frame, means detachably securing said scrubbing means to said frame, and cover means including a cover member spanning said upright pieces and slotted for reception of said projections on said upright pieces, and spring snaps carried by said member at its opposite sides adapted to snap-engage the respective said upright pieces, said member having a foot-portion extended forwardly to conceal the adjacent por-- tion of said projecting part of said scrubbing means.

3. In a machine of the character described, a frame including a pair of front, laterally-spaced upright pieces, a scrub unit including a motor and brush means supported beneath said frame with a part of said motor projecting forwardly of said frame, a member connected to said frame and scrubbing means for securing the same together, a cover member spanning said upright frame pieces and of substantial length to cover the front of said frame, the: side edges of said members being flanged to extend over the sides of said upright pieces, spring snap means carried by the flanged part of said member and releasably engageable with said upright pieces, and a forward enclosure extension at the bottom of said member covering and concealing the adjacent forwardly projecting part of said motor and brush means.

4. In a machine of the character described, a frame having a rectangularly-shaped frontend portion, a wheeled support for said frame, a T-shaped scrub unit mounted beneath said frame, and having part of its T-stem portion projecting forwardly thereof, means connected to said frame for supporting said scrub unit, a cover plate for the front end portion of said frame and having inturned i'ianges along its side edges, spring clips carried by said flanges and adapted to releasably engage said front-end portion, a forwardly-extending semi-cylindrical extension at the bottom of said plate member passing over and concealing the adjacent part of the projecting portion of said T-stem portion.

5. In a machine of the character described, a frame having a rectangularly-shaped frontend portion, a wheeled support for said frame, a scrubbing unit beneath said frame having a cylindrical part projecting forwardly of said frame, means connected to said frame for supporting said scrubbing unit, a rectangularlyshaped cover plate adapted to be placed over the front-end portion of said frame substantially covering the latter, and a semi-cylindrical shell projecting forwardly of and on the bottom portion of said plate member and covering the top of said cylindrical part of said scrubbing unit, and spring clips on said flanged part of said cover plate snap-engaging said front-end portion.

6. In a combined scrubbing and mopping machine, a frame member, and a mop unit adapted to be cut-in or cut-out at will, said mop unit including a support pivotally associated at one end with said frame member, a spring supporting the other end of said support, a squeegee pivotally carried by said support, and latch means releasably engageable with said support by downward movement of said support for holding said squeegee in floor-engaging position against the pressure of said spring.

7. In a floor machine, a frame member; and a mop unit including a squeegee supporting member pivotally associated at one end with said frame member, spring means tending normally to swing said support member upwardly about its pivotal support and to hold it in that position, a squeegee pivotally supported by said support member, a latch member pivotally associated with said frame member, spring means tending to move and hold said latch member in one direction about its pivotal support, said support member having a part releasably engage-- able with said latch member when said support member is depressed against the pressure of said first spring means.

8. In a floor machine, a frame member; and a mop unit supported thereby including a support pivoted at one end to said frame member, spring means pressing the other end of said support upwardly toward said frame member, a squeegee carried by said support, a latch member pivoted to said frame member, spring means pressing said latch member into engagement with said support and a latch element on said latch member releasably engageable with said support when the latter is depressed.

9. In a floor machine, a frame member; and a mop unit supported thereby including a support pivoted at one end to said frame member, spring means pressing the other end of said support upwardly toward said frame member, a squeegee carried by said support, a latch member pivoted to said frame member, spring means pressing said latch member rearwardly and a latch element on said latch member releasably engageable with said support when the latter is depressed, said latch element and support being released to raise said support by moving said latch member in opposition to its spring means.

10. In a floor machine, a frame member; and a mop. unit supported thereby including sup port pivoted at one end to said frame member, spring means pressing the other end of said supportupwardly toward said frame member, a squeegee carried by said support, a latch member pivoted to said frame member, spring means connected at one end to said latch member and at the other end to said support tending to move and hold said latch member yieldably in rearward direction, and a latch element on said latch member snap engageable with said support upon depression of the latter to an extent sufficient to operatively engage said squeegee with the floor surface and releasable by movement of said latch member about its pivotal support in forward direction.

11. In a floor machine, a frame member; and a mop unit supported thereby including a support pivotally associated at one end with said frame member, spring means urging said support upwardly about its pivotal support, a squeegee carried by said support, a latch member pivotally associated with said frame member, a spring means urging said latch member rearwardly about its pivotal support, a latch element on said support, and another latch element on said latch member adapted to engage said first latch element upon depression of said support to a predetermined extent against the pressure of said first spring means.

12. In a floor machine, a frame member; and a mop unit supported thereby including a support pivotally associated at one end with said frame member, spring means urging said support upwardly about its pivotal support, a squeegee carried by said support, a latch member connected to said frame member, spring means urging said latch member rearwardly about its pivotal support, a latch element adjustably mounted on said latch member, and another latch element on said support adapted to be engaged by said first latch element upon depression. of said support to a predetermined extent against the pressure of said first spring means, the adjustability of said first latch element permitting of variation in the extent of depression of said support to vary the nature of the engagement of said squeegee with the floor surface.

13. In a floor machine, a frame member; and a mop unit supported thereby including a support pivotally associated at one end with said frame member, spring means between said support and frame member tending to swing and hold said support upwardly about its pivotal support, a squeegee carried by said support, a latch member pivotally associated with said frame member, spring means between said latch member and said support urging the latch member rearwardly, a latch element on said support, and another latch element on said latch member engageable with said first latch member upon depression of said support.

14. In a fioor machine, a frame member; and a mop unit supported thereby including a U-shaped support having its U-legs pivotally associated at one end with the forward part of said frame member, spring means connected to said U-arms and frame tending to swing and hold said support upwardly about its pivotal support, a squeegee carried by said support arms, a latch member pivotall associated with said frame member and having a part extending rearwardly of said frame member, spring means between said latch member and the U-base of said support urging the latch member rearwardly, a cross member spanning the arms of said support, and a latch element on said latch member engageable with said cross member upon depression of said support.

15. In a floor machine, a frame member; and a mop unit supported thereby including a squeegee support pivotally associated at one end with said frame member, means adjustably supporting the other end of said support, a squeegee pivotally connected to said support in such a way that its forward end tends normally to tip downwardly, and an adjustable stop carried by said squeegee and extended forwardly of the pivotal connection between said squeegee and said support and above said squeegee support for adjustable engagement with the top of the latter.

18. In a floor machine, a frame member; and a mopunit supported thereby including a squeegee support pivotally associated at one end with said frame member, means adjustably supporting the other end of said support, a squeegee, a bracket pivotally connected to said support and immovably fixed to said squeegee at such a point that the forward end of said squeegee tends normally to tip downwardly, said bracket extending above said support and forwardly of its pivotal connection with said support, an adjustable stop means carried by said bracket extension and adapted to engage the top of said support to limit the extent forward tipping of said squeegee.

17. In a floor machine, a frame member; and a mop unit carried thereby including a U-shaped squeegee support having its U-arms pivotally associated with said frame member, a V-shaped squeegee, a bracket fixed immovably to each arm of' said squeegee, each said bracket being pivotally connected to the adjacent support arm, one of said brackets being extended upwardly forwardly above its pivotal connection with its support arm, a screw carried by the extended part of said bracket and engageable with the top of said support arm forwardly of said bracket pivotal connection.

13. In a floor machine, a frame member; wheel means upon which said frame is rockingly supported; and a mop unit supported by said frame member and including a squeegee support pivotally associated with the forward part of said frame member, means adjustably supporting the rear of said support, a squeegee, a bracket immovably fixed to said squeegee at such a point that the squeegee weight is forwardly of bracket, a pivotal connection between said bracket and said support at a point approximately on-center with said wheel means, and an adjustable stop carried by said squeegee and engageable with said support for limiting the forward tip motion of said squeegee.

19. In a machine of the character described, drive mechanism including a depending drive shaft, a brush support having a central pocket with a slot in bottom, and means for releasably interconnecting said drive shaft and brush support comprising a connector element having a depending tongue of less dimension than said. slot adapted to pass through said slot, said tongue having a recess in itsend, the entrance to said recess being taper-walled, and of reduced width dimension, a spring member carried by said brush support and having a pair of arms extending laterally across the underside of said slot in close proximity thereto, the normal spacing of said arms being such that as said tongue is passed through said slot said spring arms are en aged by the entrance wall of said tongue and pressed together and caused to enter said recess and to be confined therein by their normal tendency to spring apart.

28. In a machine of the character described, drive mechanism including a depending drive shaft, a brush support having a central pocket with a slot in its bottom, and means for releasably interconnecting said drive shaft and, brush support comprising a connector element having a depending tongue of lesser Width and thickness than said slot but long enough to project through said slot, the end of said tongue being formed to provide a recess therein havan entrance way of lesser width than the lilo recess with its wall tapering inwardly toward said recess, a U-shaped spring supported by said brush support and having its U-arms extended cross-wise beneath said slot in close proximity thereto, said Uarms being spaced apart normally a distance approximately equal to the width of the outer part of said taper-walled entrance way, so that said spring arms are enand pressed together by said entranceway as said tongue is passed through said slot to engage and retain said spring arms in said recess and releasably secure said tongue to said brush support.

21. In a machine of the character described, drive mechanism including a depending drive shaft, a brush support having a central pocket with a slot in its bottom, and means for releasably interconnecting said drive shaft and brushsupport comprising a connector element having: a depending tongue of lesser width and thickness than said slot but long enough to project through said slot, the end of said tongue being recessed, a pair of inwardly extending retainelements partially closing the entrance to said recess, the outer walls of said elements tapering inwardly toward said recess, a U-shaped spring carried by said brush support with its U-arms slightly flaring away from each other beneath said slot and spaced apart a distance substantially equal to the adjacent taper-walled entrance into said recess, said. spring arms being adapted to engage and to be sprungtogether and snapped into said recess behind said retaining elements as said tongue is passed through said slot into engagement with said spring arms.

22. In a machine of the character described, drive mechanism including a depending drive shaft, a brush support having a central pocket with a slot in its bottom, and means for re leasa'oly interconnecting said drive shaft and brush support comprising a depending connector element adapted to loosely pass through said slot and having a pair of opposed retaining elements at its lower end, spring means including a pair of spaced spring arms carried by said support in close proximity to the bottom of said slot, said spring arms being engageable by said retaining elements as said connector element is passed through said slot to automatically snap engage said spring arms behind said retaining elements and lock said parts together, releasable by manually springing said spring arms toward each other.

23. In a floor machine, a frame member; and,

a mop unit supported thereby including a support member pivoted at one end to said frame member, spring means pressing the other end of said support member upwardly toward frame member, a squeegee carried by said support member, a latch member carried by said frame member, another latch member carried by said support member, spring means for engaging said latch members as said support member is depressed about its pivotal support, and means for moving one of said latch members to release the same from the other latch member to permit said first spring means to raise said support membe 24. In a floor machine, a frame member; a mop unit including a squeegee supporting member pivotally associated at one end with said frame member, spring means tending normally to swing said supporting member upwardly about its pivotal support and to hold it in that position, a squeegee pivotally supported by said support member, a latch member carried by said frame member, another latch member carried by said support member, spring means tending to move and hold said latch members engaged as said support member is swung downwardly about its pivotal support, and means movable independently of said support member for moving said latch members out of engagement with each other for self-return of said support member to a raised position.

25. In a floor treating machine of that character including a frame, mopping means, scrubbing means and supporting wheel means; means for connecting said mopping means, scrubbing means and wheel means to said frame which comprises a member having an upstanding rear part adapted to be connected to the under central portion of the frame, a forwardly projecting pair of spaced arms adapted to supper said scrubbing means and to which said mopping means is adapted to be connected, and a depending part on each arm adapted to support said wheel means.

26. In a floor treating machine of that character including a frame, mopping means, scrubbing means and wheel support means; means for connecting said mopping means, scrubbing means and wheel means to said frame which comprises a U-shaped casting having a U-base portion adapted to be secured to the lower central portion of the frame with its U-arms projecting forwardly, ,a member bridging the outer end portions of said arms for supporting the scrubbing means, said arms being also constructed to support the mopping means, and a part depending from and intermediate the ends of each or said arms arranged to support the wheel meant.

27. In machine or" the character described, drive mechanism including a depending drive shaft, a brush support having a drive-connecting slot the, sin, and means for releasably interconnecting said (i1 is shaft and brush support comprising a depending connector element associated with said drive shaft and adapted to loosely pass through said slot, and means including a pair of spaced-apart spring arms carried by said brush support and disposed in close proximity to the underside of said slot, said connector element having a recess therein adapted to receive said spring arms in a substantially normal spaced-apart condition, the end of said connector eiement which passes through said slot having an entranceway leading into said recess, said entranceway having an outer portion of sufficient width to receive said spring arms in their normal spaced-apart condition, and an inner end portion adjacent said recess narrowed to a width less than the normal spacing of said arms, whereby said arms may be passed through said entranceway into said recess and automatically engaged and retained in said recess by merely passing said connector element through said slot, said parts being disconnectible by manually pressing together said spring arms so that they may be freely removed from said recess through said narrowed portion of said entranceway.

il /ALTER S. FINNELL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2607068 *Apr 24, 1946Aug 19, 1952Minerley Frederick KSuction operated floor cleaning device employing liquid
US2748408 *Nov 8, 1951Jun 5, 1956Lappin Robert IApplying and polishing apparatus
US2969557 *Nov 30, 1956Jan 31, 1961Clarke Floor Machine CompanyPowered floor scrubber
US2978719 *Dec 30, 1957Apr 11, 1961Advance Machine CoMobile floor treating machine
US3040362 *Aug 8, 1958Jun 26, 1962Hoover CoSuction cleaning apparatus
US3060484 *Sep 11, 1958Oct 30, 1962Hoover CoFloor scrubber
US3344455 *Oct 24, 1965Oct 3, 1967Whirlpool CoBrush attachment structure
US4457036 *Sep 10, 1982Jul 3, 1984Tennant CompanyDebris collecting mechanism
US8365351 *Mar 30, 2006Feb 5, 2013Diversey, Inc.Floor cleaning machine comprising a vertically movable water slider
US20100154149 *Mar 30, 2006Jun 24, 2010Dieter WindmeisserFloor Cleaning Machine Comprising a Vertically Movable Water Slider
EP0202175A1 *Apr 30, 1986Nov 20, 1986Gilbert JuifMachine for treating plane surfaces, especially for cleaning floors
WO1993014684A1 *Jan 20, 1993Aug 5, 1993Numatic Int LtdMachines for scrubbing or finishing floor surfaces
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/50.1, 15/320, 15/385
International ClassificationA47L11/29, A47L11/30
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/305, A47L11/40, A47L11/4052, A47L11/4069, A47L11/4038, A47L11/4044
European ClassificationA47L11/40G, A47L11/40F2, A47L11/40J4, A47L11/40F6, A47L11/40, A47L11/30B2