Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1979875 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1934
Filing dateFeb 17, 1931
Priority dateFeb 17, 1931
Publication numberUS 1979875 A, US 1979875A, US-A-1979875, US1979875 A, US1979875A
InventorsFaus Herbert W
Original AssigneeFaus Herbert W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hot-box indicator
US 1979875 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 6, 1934. H. w. FAUS HOT BOX INDICATOR Filed Feb. 17. 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Nov. 6, 1934. H w, AU 1,979,875

HOT BOX INDI CATOR Filed Feb. 17. 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 5 gwuml oz fifemsaET E05 Patented Nov. 6, 1934 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE HOT-BOX INDICATOR Herbert W. Fans, White Plains, N. Y.

Application February 1'1, 1931, Serial No. 516,426

16 Claims. (01. 308-38) This application is a continuation in part of my application for- Hot-box indicators, Serial No. 483,714, filed September 22, 1930.

This invention relates to hot-box indicators, and more particularly, to means for showing when a bearing on railway rolling stock has reached an abnormal temperature either by the emission of a dense cloud of smoke, a pervasive odor, or both.

The principal object of my invention, generally considered, is the provision of a journal box or locomotive driving box containing a bearing provided with one or more pockets normally closed by fusible elements or plugs which melt when the bearing reaches a predetermined elevated temperature and release material which is readily noticeable for indicating a hot-box, the box or lid being desirably formed for venting said material while retarding the entrance of dirt or other foreign material into the box.

Another object of my invention is the provision of a bearing with one or more pockets containing material and normally stoppered by fusible means, whereby when the brass in service reaches an abnormal temperature due to the development of a hotbox or overheated bearing, the material escapes upon melting of the fusible means to give a readily noticeable warning either by the development of a cloud of smoke, the production of a disagreeable or pervasive odor, or both.

Afurther object of my invention is the provision of a journal box and associated lid pivotally connected thereto, said box or lid being provided with 2. preferably hooded vent or one closed with fusible means whereby a warning material may be emitted at the proper time for indicating a hot box, the interior of the box being normally protected from the entrance of dirt and foreign material.

Other objects and advantages of the invention relating to the particular arrangement and construction of the various parts will become apparent as the description proceeds.

Referring to the drawings illustrating my invention, the scope whereof is defined by the appended claims:-

Figure l is a fragmentary, vertical, sectional view of a journal box, an associated journal, and auxiliary parts embodying my invention.

Fig. 2 is a plan of the bearing brass shown in Fig. 1, said brass being shown partly in horizontal section to more clearly disclose the pockets or cells containing the material for giving a hot-box warning.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view of one end of the brass shown in Fig. 1, showing the details of the means for closing a cell with .a fusible plug.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary side elevation of the journal box lid shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is a horizontal, sectional view on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary view of a portion of the lid, such as shown in Fig. 1, but illustrating a modified venting means.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary view corresponding to Fig. 2, but showing a modified arrangement of pockets or cells for holding hot-box indicating material.

Figs. 8 and 9 are views corresponding, respectively, to Figs. 1 and 2, but showing a modification.

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary view corresponding to Fig. 9, but on an enlarged scale to more clearly show the construction.

Hot bearings, generally designated as hotboxes, are one of the most frequent causes of derailments and train delays on railways today. On one large railway system during the year 1929, seventy hot-boxes on cars and locomotives were not detected until the journal melted off. Thirty-three of these resulted in serious derailments. During the same year, twelve locomotive driving axles failed. Most of these failures were caused by overheating. With the increase in length of trains and speed of operation, and as a result of the success which has attended efforts to make journal box lids fit as tightly as possible in order to exclude. dirt from the bearings, it has become more and more difiicult for the train crew to detect a hotbox in time to avoid serious consequences. With the shorter trains, lower speeds and loose fitting journal box lids formerly prevalent, the trainmen were usually able to see or smell the smoke from over-heated lubricating oil orgrease in time to stop the train before any serious damage was done.

For the above reasons, a serious'need has arisen for the provision of some device which will attract the attention of a reasonably diligent train crew, crossing watchman, tower man, or the crew of a passing train, to an over-heated hearing, at the earliest possible moment.

I have, therefore, invented a device to give a definite signal to the train crew whenever any bearing equipped ther'ewith becomes heated to a specific predetermined temperature. Such temperature must be above the normal operating temperature of the bearing, but below that at which the physical properties of the material of the journal and axle begin to be adversely affected. Investigation has shown that the normal temperature of oil lubricated car Journals varies from atmospheric temperature up to about 150 F. Tests have-shown that American Railway Association standard car axle steel will successfully withstand temperatures up to at least 400 F. without permanent injury. Therefore, the device which I have invented is adapted to give a warning signal to the train crew automatically when the bearing reaches a temperature of say 200 F., so that ample time will be available before any damage is done Even under former conditions of operation, when the trainmen were able to depend upon their ability to smell or see the smoke from burning lubricating oil, it was seldom possible to detect the hot-box and stop the train before the bearing had been destroyed and the axle permanently injured. A device constructed in accordance with my invention wil give a warning to the train crew and permit the train to be stopped even before the oil begins to burn.

Referring to the drawings in detail, like parts being designated by like reference characters, there is shown a Journal box 1 provided with a hinge lug 2 and a lid 3 pivotally connected to said lug as by means of a hinge pin or pintle 4. Received in the box is an associated Journal 5 normally in engagement with a brass or bearing 6 between which and the top of the box is disposed a usual form of wedge '7. The lid 3 closes the outer opening in the box and a dust guard 8 of any desired character may close the inner opening around the axle 9.

In the embodiment of my invention illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the brass is provided with three preferably cylindrical chambers or pockets 10, 11 and 12. Said pockets are adapted to be normally filled with liquids each of which has a boiling point below the temperature at which the hot-box indicator is intended to function. The pockets or chambers 10, 11 and 12 have desirably extending from their outer ends small passages 13, 14 and 15 converging toward one another and simultaneously closed by a fusible element, wall or plug 16 held in place in any desired manner as by means of an apertured screw plug 1'7 threaded into the outer end of the brass 6. The desired liquids or other materials may be placed in the chambers 10, 11 and 12, and said chambers closed by screw plugs or other desired means 18, 19 and 20.

The selection of liquids which have boiling points lower than the melting point of the fusible plug 16 will result in said liquids being under pressure before the plug melts so that they will escape in the form of gases upon release. The outlet from each chamber is desirably restricted in size and extends from the top of the chamber, as shown most clearly in Fig. 3, so that the outflow is protracted over a substantial pe-. riod of time. Tests have shown that this time can be extended to ten minutes, or more. The

- plug 16 may be constructed of an alloy of such composition that it melts at the desired temperature. Thus an alloy consisting of 25% tin, 25% lead, and 50% bismuth, will melt at 200 F. An alloy containing 40% tin, 10% lead, and 50% bismuth, will melt at 240 F.

The chambers 10 and 11 are intended to be filled with chemical substances which, when mixed in the form of vapor, will produce a dense,

easily visible and persistent smoke that will attract the attention of the train crew, crossing watchman, power man, or the crew of a passing train. Existing instructions in effect on the various railroads in this country make it the duty of all these employees to watch for hot-boxes. The chamber 12 is intended to be filled with a liquid of such composition that when emitted in the form of vapor it will add to the smoke above described a penetrating, pervasive and/or disagreeable odor. The addition of the odor is desired to add to the certainty that attention will be attracted to the hot-box. The odor is especially important at night when a visible signal might not be easily detected.

Suitable liquids for chambers 10 and 11 are sulphur dioxide and anhydrous ammonia. The boiling points of these liquids are minus 10 C. and minus 38.5 0., respectively. They will, therefore, be under high pressure when the melting point of the fusible plug is reached and will escape with considerable force. The outlet nozzles, as shown, are so positioned that the two gases will immediately mix, and when mixed together with water vapor, always present in the atmosphere, form a dense white smoke of great volume which, under normal conditions, will attract attention for a considerable distance. These two substances are cited merely as examples. There are other combinations which may be used, if desired.

Either hydrogen sulphide, which has a boiling point of minus 61.8 C., or ethyl mercaptan, which has a boiling point of 36 C., may be used to fill the chamber 12. Either of these liquids which, of course, are merely cited as examples, when vaporized, will add an odor which will meet the requirements for satisfactorily indieating a hot-box.

In order to provide for the escape of the warning material or vapor, an aperture 21 may be provided in the top wall of the box 1 preferably adjacent the hinge lug 2 and beneath the cam portion 22 formed as part of the hinge lug for engagement by the resilient means 23 of the lid for holding the lid in open or closed position. The cam portion 22 is desirably extended over the opening 21 and a flange 24 desirably extends around the opening 21 so that said open ing is satisfactorily hooded to restrict the entry of dirt and foreign material into the box, while not interfering with the escape of hot'box indicating materials and the introduction of air and the desired water vapor carried thereby. Another venting aperture 25 may be provided through the lid' of the box either as supplemental to the aperture 21 or as an alternative therewith. The aperture 25 is desirably hooded by means of a hollow embossment 26 on the front face of the box to minimize the entrance of foreign material into the box.

As an alternative, 8. venting aperture 27 may be provided either through the lid 3 shown in Fig. 6, or through a wall of the journal box 1, said aperture being normally closed by a fusible plug 28 which is adapted to melt upon the development of a. hot-box.

In the embodiment of my invention shown in Fig. 7, I have shown only two chambers 10 and 12, the construction being otherwise in accordance with that shown in Fig. 2. The chamber 10 may be filled with a liquid such as silicon tetrachloride, titanium tetrachloride, or a mixture of the two. Either ofthese liquids, when vaporized, produce a dense smoke of the sort delid sired. In order to reduce the boiling point of titanium tetrachloride and make it more suitable for use with journal boxes such as are usually provided on railway cars, said material is preferably used mixed with an equal part of carbon tetrachloride. For use with locomotive driving boxes, however, which use grease, and where the normal temperatures are designed to be higher, titanium tetrachloride is desirably used by itself without admixture with carbon tetrachloride. Of course, these substances are cited only as examples. Hydrogen sulphide, ethyl mercaptan, or other odorous material, may be used in the chamber 12 as in the previous embodiment. Although in this and the previous embodiment a plurality of chambers has been shown, it will be understood that, if desired, only one chamber may be employed, and a warning signal produced acting only on the sense of sight or on the sense of smell.

Referring now to the embodiment of my invention illustrated in Figures 8, 9 and 10, there is shown a journal box 1' receiving an associated journal 5' normally in engagement with a brass or bearing 6*, between which and the top of the box is shown a usual form of wedge 7 The brass 6 is preferably provided with three cylindrical chambers or pockets 10 11 and 12 Said pockets 10 and 12 are normally filled with a liquid, or liquids, which have a boiling point, or points below the temperature at which the hot-box indicator is intended to function. Said chambers 10 and 12 are united with the chamber ll by passages 29, formed in any desired manner, as by means of drilling from the outside of the brass through the chambers 12 and ll into the chamber 10, and closing the outer end of the passages 29 thus produced, as by means of a screw plug 38. The chambers 10 and 12 are desirably normally separated from the intervening chamber 11 by means of fusible plugs 31 held in place against shouldered portions 32 on the brass 6 as by means of screw plugs 18 and 20 The screw plugs 18 and 20 are, desirably formed partially hollow or provided with pockets opening toward the plugs 31 to provide spaces for the metal to flow when melted. These fusible plugs 31, of course, not only separate the chambers 10 and 12' from the chamber 11', but close the open ends of said chambers 10 and 12 The chamber 11 has its open or large end closed by a corresponding screw plug 19 and its front or outer end provided with a passage 14 of preferably small bore closed by a fusible element, wall or plug 16*, held in place in any desired manner, as by means of a screw plug 17? threaded into the outer end of the brass 6 The screw plug 1'7 is'desirably pocketed or formed partly hollow like the plugs 18 and 20 to provide space for the metal in the plug 16 to flow when melted. The passage 14* desirably extends from the upper portion of the pocket 11 and the passages 29 desirably connect the upper portions of the pockets 10 and 12' with the pocket 11 so that the liquid confined in the pockets 10 and 12 desirably passes out from the tops of the pockets after vaporization, or the vaporized portion passes out first. The plug 17 is desirably ofiset upwardly, as shown most clearly in Figure 8, so that a central aperture 33 therethrough is normally alined with the venting aperture l rfrom the intermediate pocket 11".

The pockets 10 and 12 are desirably filled with any suitable liquid such as previously described for indicating a hot-box either by producing a dense smoke,' a disagreeable odor, or both, a preferred liquid being 50% of titanium tetrachloride and 50% of carbon tetrachloride, having a boiling point of approximately 180 F. After filling the pockets of chambers 10 and 12 with such a liquid, said pockets are desirably closed by fusible plugs 31 formed of material which preferably melts at 280 F., so that said liquid is confined under pressure in the pockets 10 and 12 until such a temperature is reached when the vapor from the liquid, probably intermixed with unvaporized liquid, is discharged into the intermediate pocket 11 for complete vaporization and/or superheating, and final discharge through the passages 14* and 33, the fusible plug 16 closing said passages being desirably constructed of metal melting at a lower temperature than that of the plugs 31, so that said passages are open when the material is discharged from the pockets 10 and 12'. If desired, the plug l6 may be constructed of an alloy containing 40% tin, 10% lead, 50% bismuth, melting at 240 F. If desired, however, the plug 16 may be entirely omitted as it has preferably melted when the material is discharged from the pockets 10 and 12 it being preferably used, however, as a safety seal for the material in the pockets 10 and 12. Although I have shown three chambers or pockets 10 ll and 12 it will be understood that only two may be used, if desired, as shown in Figure 7, as the superheating effect may be accomplished with one of the chambers 10 and 12 eliminated.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that I have devised a hot-box indicator adapted to be used in connection with car, locomotive, or other bearings, and preferably incorporated directly with the bearing or brass and adapted, upon the development of a predetermined abnormal temperature to emit a visible warning, an odorous warning, or'both, whereby a hot-box may be detected and remedied prior to destruction of the bearing and associated journal with the j{:jgnsequent danger of derailment and loss of Although preferred embodiments of my invention have been illustrated, it will be understood that modifications may be made within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim;

1. A bearing with a pocket normally closed by a fusible element, said pocket containing a material which, when released by melting of the element, is vaporized to indicate a hot-box.

2. A bearing with a pocket normally closed by a fusible element, said pocket containing material which escapes as a dense cloud of smoke upon melting of the element.

3. A bearing with a pocket normally closed by a fusible element, said pocket containing a mate-' rial which, when released by melting of the element, has a pervasive and disagreeable odor for indicating a hot-box.

4. A bearing with a plurality of pockets normally closed by a fusible element, said pockets containing materials which upon mixing after melting. of the element chemically react to form a dense cloud of smoke for indicating a hot-box.

5. A hearing with a plurality of pockets therein normally closed by a fusible element, said pockets respectively containing materials which, when released by melting of the element,

escape to affect the senses of sight and smell to give warning of a hot-box.

6. A bearing with a plurality of pockets normally closed by fusible means, one of said pockets containing a material which, when released by melting of its closing means, passes into another pocket for more complete vaporization and final discharge therefrom to indicate a hot-box.

'7. A bearing with a plurality of pockets separated by fusible means, at least one of-said pockets containing material which, upon melting of said fusible means, passes to the other pocket for superheating and final escape therefrom as a dense cloud of smoke.

8. A bearing with a plurality of pockets separated by fusible means, at least one of said pockets being normally empty, and at least one pocket containing material which, when released upon melting of said means, passes. into an empty pocket for superheating and escape for indicating a hot-box.

9. In a Journal box, a bearing brass and a cell in combination therewith emitting a noticeable material when the brass reaches a predetermined elevated temperature, said box having a vent for releasing said material so that it will be readily noticeable.

10. In combination, a Journal box, a lid pivotally mounted thereon, a vent through said lid,

and a fusible plug normally closing said vent and adapted to melt when the box reaches a predetermined temperature for permitting the release of hot-box indicating material.

11. In combination, a Journal box, a hot-box indicating cell therein adapted to release noticeable material upon said box reaching a predetermined temperature, an outlet from said box, and a plug adapted to melt at approximately said temperature for releasing said material.

12. In a journal box, a plurality of cells re spectively containing different materials, and restricted passages from said cells simultaneously closed by fusible means, said fusible means being adapted to melt at a predetermined temperature 80 to permit the release and combination of said materials for indicating a hot-box.

13. A Journal box having a hinge lug/and a lid pivoted thereto and closing the outer opening in said box, said box being apertured beneath said lug, said lug being hollow and serving as a hood over said aperture to minimize the entrance of foreign material into said box, while permitting the escape of hot-box indicating material.

14. A Journal box containing a bearing, said bearing enclosing material which is releasable upon the development of excessive temperatures to indicate a hot-box, and a lid pivotally mounted on said box, said lid having a hooded vent therethrough for permitting the escape of said material.

15. In a Journal box, a bearing, said bearing enclosing material releasable when the bearing reaches a predetermined elevated temperature, 104: said box having an aperture for admitting air to the interior thereof to carry water vapor for combining with said material to make it readily noticeable and allowing release from said box. 1

16. In a Journal box, a bearing, said bearing 105 enclosing material combinable with water vapor to form a dense smoke of great volume and releasable when the bearing reaches a predetermined elevated temperature, said box having an aperture for admitting air to the interior thereof to carry water vapor for combining with said material and permitting escape from said box.

HERBERT W. FAUS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2431239 *Oct 2, 1943Nov 18, 1947Gallagher James WJournal box for railway cars
US2440331 *Oct 4, 1944Apr 27, 1948William F EisensmithSafety oiling means for car journals
US2527923 *Dec 27, 1945Oct 31, 1950Herbert W FausHotbox alarm or indicator
US2552271 *Oct 4, 1946May 8, 1951Herbert W FausCartridge for hot-bearing or hotbox alarms or indicators
US2566494 *Dec 13, 1946Sep 4, 1951Standard Car Truck CoHotbox alarm device
US2858792 *Apr 20, 1956Nov 4, 1958Turco Products IncRailway journal box dust and oil guard
US2994566 *Oct 31, 1956Aug 1, 1961Timken Roller Bearing CoSafety lubricating and alarm device
US3020873 *Jan 22, 1959Feb 13, 1962Lawrence E BodkinBrake with wear detecting means
US3197632 *Jul 20, 1959Jul 27, 1965Westinghouse Air Brake CoHot bearing detector
US3228735 *Mar 7, 1961Jan 11, 1966Stewart John TDamage indicators for car axle bearings
US4608556 *Jul 2, 1984Aug 26, 1986Cole Martin TSmoke detection apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification384/158, 246/169.00A, 116/207, 384/91, 116/214
International ClassificationB61K9/04, B61K9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB61K9/04
European ClassificationB61K9/04