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Publication numberUS1980193 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1934
Filing dateApr 29, 1932
Priority dateApr 29, 1932
Publication numberUS 1980193 A, US 1980193A, US-A-1980193, US1980193 A, US1980193A
InventorsFinegan Ellwood J
Original AssigneeMichael J Power
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chip cutter
US 1980193 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. J. FINEGAN Nov. 13, 1934.

CHIP CUTTER Filed April 29. 1932 Q I Q QM/ Ms Cittornegs Patented Nov. 13, 1934 UNITED STATES CHIP CUTTER Ellwood J. Finegan, Nekoosa, Wis., assignor of one-half to Michael J. Power, Nekoosa, 'Wis.

Application April 29 1932, Serial No. 08,164

7 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in chip cutters.

It is the primary object of the invention to provide a novel and improved chip cutter which will operate more effectively than existing devices for breaking and separating the fibers of wood chips to facilitate the entry of digesting liquids used in the manufacture of pulp.

'It is a further object of the invention to pro-.- vide a novel and improved mechanical organization in which few parts are required, said parts being adapted for economical manufacture, repair, replacement and maintenance.

It is a further object of the invention toprovide a novel and improved mechanical assembly of the component elements of the machine whereby the individual crushing rolls are freev to yield with respect to each other without destroying the driving connection therebetween and without departing to any great degree from a predetermined center line or line of bite.

In the drawing:

Figure l is a plan view of the device embodying the invention.

Figure 2 is a side elevation of the device with a portion broken away to expose a stripping finger employed in connection with each of the rolls.

Figure .3 is an enlarged detail view showing in fragmentary longitudinal section the construction of the rolls and the manner in which they interact.

Like parts are identified by the same reference characters throughout the several views.

Slidably movable to and from each other on a bed frame 4 are sub-frames or carriages 5 and 6, each of which is provided at 7 and 8 with bearings for the respective roll shafts 9 and 10.

The roll shafts are extended at opposite sides of the machine to receive pulleys 11 and 12 respectively, each of the pulleys preferably having multiple grooves. The pulleys are separately driven by individual motors 15 and 16 to which they are individually connected by belts 17 and 18.

The two carriages or sub-frames 5 and 6 are connected at each side of the machine by tension bolts 19 suitably headed at both ends and provided with compression springs 20 and 21 engaging the outside portions of the respective carriages, whereby resiliently to oppose the separation of the carriages or sub-frames.

The extent to which the carriages or subframes may approach each other is defined by set screws 22 threadedly engaged with one of the carriages and provided with lock nuts 23 to maintain them in adjustment. The heads Of. the set screws will be engaged by the other carriage to define the minimum separation of the carriages.

-It will be observed that the carriages or subframes 5 and 6 float freely on the base frame 4, each of them being free to move in either direction on-the bed. They are, however, roughly centered on the bed frame by means of a centering lug illustrated at 25 which prevents either carriage from moving across the center line to the portion ofthe bed frame occupied by the other carriage. The carriages are maintained in their proper position relatively to each other, however, by the set screw- 22, tension rods 19, springs 20 and 21, quite independently of the centering lug.

:Each of the shafts 9 and 10 carries a cylinder 30. The. respective cylinders are each provided with one. or more. longitudinal keyways 31 containing keys 32. Upon each cylinder is assembled a set of replaceable rings of alternately varying. form. Plain annuli such as that shown at 34 alternate with toothed annuli such as that shown. at 35, the arrangement being such that the toothed annuli of the respective cylinders are staggered to register with plain annuli of the opposite cylinders. Thus, the teeth of annuli 35 overlap each other as clearly shown in Fig. 3, whereby very effectively to bend, crush and distort chips fed between the cylinders.

In addition to the bending and crushing action produced by the staggered and overlapping teeth of annuli 35, there is also a crushing or cutting action of the teeth upon chips confined against the opposed cylindrical surface of the associated plain annulus 34. As shown in Fig. 3, each tooth in the course of its rotation on one of the drums or cylinders approaches very closely to the cylindrical surfaces of the opposite annulus 34 on the other drum. Any portion of a chip caught beneath one of these teeth is practically severed, and this action of the teeth is more effective in opening up the fibers for the digesting action of pulp liquors than is the more usual action produced by the mere alternating and overlapping teeth.

In the event that the teeth require sharpening or replacement it is a simple matter, because of the construction herein disclosed, to remove either one of the complete roll assemblies from the machine and to strip off and replace any desired number of the rings 34 or 35.

In view of the rolls between the teeth of rings and the cylindrical surfaces of rings 34, there is some tendency for chips to become lodged between the consecutive spaced rings 35 of any given row. To remove chips which adhere to the rolls, I prefer to employ stripping fingers such as those shown at 3'7. These may conveniently be mounted on a bracket made of a flattened cross shaft at 38. Preferably, one of the fingers will contact the surface of each ring 34 between the toothed rings 35 at either side thereof.

I claim:

1. In a chip cutter, the combination witha pair of co-acting rolls andv a bed frame, of sub-frames individually supporting the respective rolls and fioatingly mounted for sliding movement to, and from each other on the bed frame, means distinct from said bed frame opposing the separation of said sub-frames independently of their position on said bed frame, and meanson, the respectivesub-frames for individually .d'rivingflthe respective rolls.

2. In a chip cutter, the combination with a pair of co-acting rolls and a bed frame, of unitaryv sub-frames individually supporting the respective rolls and floatingly mounted for sliding movement to and from each other on the bed frame, means independent of said bedframe opposing the separation of said sub-frames, and means on the respective sub-frames for individually driving the respective rolls, means for limiting the approach. of the sub-frames toward each other, and; means for limiting the movement of each sub-frame on the bed. frame toward the portion of the bed frame normally occupied by the other sub-frame.

3'. In a chip cutter, the. combination with a bed frame,- of a plurality of sub-frames slidably mounted on the bed frame for movement to and from each other, resilient tension means connecting the sub-frames with each other, independently 'of said bed frame whereby to oppose their relative separation, a. stop on said bed frame positioned between said sub-frames for limiting the movement of each sub-frame toward. the normal position of the. other chip cutting rolls individually supported by the respective sub-frames and provided. with individual drivingmeans on said sub-frames, and staggered owerlapping teeth on each of said rolls interacting with untoothed portions of the companion roll.

4. In a chip cutter, the combination with a bed frame, of a pair of sub-frames slidable respectively on said bed frame, a stop on said bed frame positioned between the sub-frames for limiting the movement of each sub-frame toward the normal position of the other, a, stop on one of said sub-frames engageable with the other sub-frame for limiting the approach of the sub-frames to- Ward each other, and resilient tension means connecting the sub-frames independently of the bed frame.

5. In a chip cutter, the combination with a bed frame, of a pair of. sub-frames slidable respectively on said: bed frame, a stop on said bed frame positioned between the sub-frames for limiting the movement of each sub-frame toward the norma]; position of the other, a stop on one of said sub-frames engageable with the other sub-frame for limiting: the; approach. of the sub-frames toward each other, resilient tension means connecting: the suh-frames independently of the bed frame, chip cutting. rolls each supported by a sub frame, and individual driving. means for each roll supportedby the: bed, frame.

In a. chip cutter, the combination with a bed frame, of a pair of sub-framesaslidable respectively" on said bed frame, a stop on, one of said suh-frames engageable with. the other sub-frame for limiting the approach of said sub-frames: toward each other, and resilient; tension-means connecting the sub-frames independently of the bediframe; 1

In, In a chip cutter, the combination with a bed frame, of a pair of sub-iramesslidable respectively on said hedirama. a stop on said bed frame positioned between the sub-frames for limiting the. movement of: each sub-frame toward the: normalv position of the other, and resilient tension means connecting the sub-frames independently of the bed frame. f

- FINEGAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4411391 *May 15, 1981Oct 25, 1983Ofrex Group LimitedDocument shredding machines
US4625925 *Mar 28, 1984Dec 2, 1986Feinwerktechnik Schleicher & Co.Comminuting apparatus for sheet material or sheet material layers
US4953795 *Oct 24, 1988Sep 4, 1990Beloit CorporationWood chip cracking apparatus
US5232510 *Dec 16, 1991Aug 3, 1993Tilbey Sydney ESlitting apparatus for sugarcane rind
US5385309 *Nov 16, 1993Jan 31, 1995Beloit Technologies, Inc.Segmented wood chip cracking roll
US5586648 *Jun 21, 1995Dec 24, 1996Focke & Co. (Gmbh & Co.)Hinge-lid cigarette pack made from a one-piece blank
US5722604 *Apr 18, 1995Mar 3, 1998Dudley; Russell D.Metal scrap shredder
US5842507 *Feb 7, 1997Dec 1, 1998Bmh Wood Technology OyWood chip optimizer
US8034449Oct 19, 2010Oct 11, 2011Forest Concepts, LLCEngineered plant biomass feedstock particles
US8039106Dec 13, 2010Oct 18, 2011Forest Concepts, LLCEngineered plant biomass feedstock particles
US8158256Sep 27, 2011Apr 17, 2012Forest Concepts, LLCEngineered plant biomass feedstock particles
US8481160Aug 24, 2012Jul 9, 2013Forest Concepts, LLCBimodal and multimodal plant biomass particle mixtures
US8496033Nov 30, 2012Jul 30, 2013Forest Concepts, LLCComminution process to produce engineered wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from veneer
US8497019Aug 15, 2012Jul 30, 2013Forest Concepts, LLCEngineered plant biomass particles coated with bioactive agents
US8497020Jan 11, 2013Jul 30, 2013Forest Concepts, LLCPrecision wood particle feedstocks
US8507093Jan 14, 2013Aug 13, 2013Forest Concepts, LLCComminution process to produce precision wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from wood chips
US9440237Apr 1, 2015Sep 13, 2016Forest Concepts, LLCCorn stover biomass feedstocks with uniform particle size distribution profiles at retained field moisture contents
US20150190943 *Jun 27, 2013Jul 9, 2015Zuiko CorporationDevice for producing absorbent body
DE2338654A1 *Jul 31, 1973Feb 20, 1975Jun Adolf EhingerDocument shredder with stripper - has sections between cutter discs over part of periphery as annular segments
WO1990004672A1 *Sep 14, 1989May 3, 1990Beloit CorporationWood chip cracking apparatus
WO1991003595A1 *Sep 4, 1990Mar 21, 1991Sunds Defibrator Industries AktiebolagThe treatment of wood chips
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/234, 241/236, 241/167
International ClassificationD21B1/06, D21B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationD21B1/061
European ClassificationD21B1/06B