Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1980408 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1934
Filing dateSep 19, 1929
Priority dateSep 19, 1929
Publication numberUS 1980408 A, US 1980408A, US-A-1980408, US1980408 A, US1980408A
InventorsJansky Charles G
Original AssigneeWilson Western Sporting Goods
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club
US 1980408 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 13, 1934.

C, G. JANSKY GOLF l01.1513 y Filed Sept.' 19, 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 C. G. JANSKY Nov. 13, 1934.

GQLF CLUB Filed Sept. 19, 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Mya/fiar: 6720/765 (fifa/75,@

www dxf/yi Patented Nov. 13, 1934 UNITEDA smits PATENT orme .1

freeoaoe 'l GOLF CLUB Y Charles G. Jansk'y, ,Berwyn, Ill., assgncrto Wil-- 50h-Western Sporting Goods Company, Chicago, Ill., a vcorpo'rati'on'-of`Delaware g Application September 19,1929", Serial No. 393,693 4 claims. (ctms-s0) l The present invention relatesftogolf v"clubs and is particularly concerned `with improvements inI the connection between the shaft and head ofthe golf club for the'purpose of improving the characteristics of the club. f

f The invention is of particular importance in connection with golf irons having a steelshaft,`v but it should be understood that its use is not necessarily confined to irons, and some or all lof the features described herein may be utilizedupon clubsv of any kind in which it may be desirable to improve the resilient characteristics of the club.

` The preferred embodiment which has been selected to illustrate the invention, comprises an 1l iron having a steel shaft andfan iron "head Y' of medium pitch, but this embodiment is 'merely exemplary of one of the Aforms ofthe' invention which may be employed with irons of any pitch orshape.

A One of the objects of the present invention isthe provision'of an improved golf club in which the head is secured to the vhandle or shaft in such manner as to prevent the shook or vibration resulting from the impact, from being transmitted' up the shaft to the hands of the player.y j

Another object is theprovision of an improved hosel construction for golf irons, invvhich the' hosel structure` includes elements adapted to cushion and absorb the rvibration or shockl impressed upon the shaft by impact with the ball; for the purpose of improving the characteristics and feel of steel shafted golf i,rons.v

Another object is the provision of an improved shock absorbing connection between the head and shaft of a golf club by means of which the head is permanently andsecurely mounted on the shaft in such manner as to positively resist lany rota` tive movement of the head onV the axis of the shaft to avoid the slicing which would inevitably result from such movement. y

Another object is the provision of an improved ferrule construction which is'adapted to protect the shaft ofthe club at the'pointwhere the shaft emerges from the hosel and which is more durable and 'eicient thang the devices of the prior art which are used for this.v purpose.

Another object is the provision of an improved.

golf club of theclass described, having a'lmetal shaft and a head vsecured to said shaft in such manner as to permita limited andv cushioned,

movement between parts of the ,head andthel shaft on an axis lying in a plane which is substan-.. tially at right angles to thedirection of flightj, vOtherobjects and advantages-of the invention y will be apparent Vfrom the following description and from the accompanying drawings, in which similar characters l of reference indicate similar parts throughout theseveralviews. f

Referring to the drawings, Iof which there are two sheets; v 6

Fig. 1 is an elevational view, in partial section, of a golf club constructed according to the present invention; @Y Y Fig. 2 is a similar View Withthe section taken on a plane at right angles to the sectional parts of Fig. 1, and with the parts of the clubin the position which they vassume immediately after impact with the/ball; f

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2, of a modified form ofccmstruction;v f ,y

gFig. 4 is a similar view of another modified form ofconstructionj Fig. 5 is a similarview of another modification.

Referring to Figs. land 2, the golf club which is indicate'doin its *entirety by the numeral 10 75 preferably comprises 'the shaft 11,"which may b e provided with any formj of `conventional grip, 1 2 and with a club head 13. The invention'is of particulariinportance with respect to golf clubs employing a tubularshafty of steel or other re-l silient metalyand the shaftv 11 is ordinarily ta'- pered from the upper end'of the shaft adjacent the grip to the lower` end Where it is securedto the head 13. Theclub head 13 is provided with fblade 14`having a face l5, the pitch and-shape of'which vary. depending upon ,the type of the club, and `the face 15 may be provided with'the conventional corrugated or ribbed surface best adapted to engage a golf ball. The transverse markings .16 define the vstriking surface of the club, while the centrally located marking 17 in dicates the preferred point of impact upon `the face 15.

v 'The club head 134is provided with a hosel 1 8 having a socket 19 adapted to receive the end of. the" shaft 11., The socket 19 may consist of a bore 19 .which is adapted to receive the end of the shaft 1.1 with a close frictional fit, and the upper end of the hosel 18 is preferably provided'with a counterbore 20 forming an annular chamber WithinA thelhosel about the shaft 11. v The wall of the chamber between the bore 19 and the counterbore 2O preferably tapers as at 21- to facilitate the driving of the shaft 11 into the socket 19.

It will thus Vbe observed that the shaft 11 is secured to the 'club 13 by direct engagement of the shaft with the interior of the hosel, but the upper portions of the hosel 18 are spaced lfrom the.sur, face'ofthe shaft 11 in order to permitirle shaft 11 to bend within the hosel 18 and to permit.rela.

' tive movement between parts of the shaft and and the bores 22, '23 may be filled withavcylindrical metal member 24 riveted into the hosel at each end. If desired, the bore 22 in hosel 18 may be slightly countersunk at each end and the ends of the cylindrical metal member 24 are ground off flush With the exterior surface of the hosel 18.

In the preferred embodiment of the invention,

the end of shaft 11 has a drive fitwith the borek 19, but in the modified form of construction shown in Fig. 5, the bore 19 may be provided with a slight degree of clearance- 25 at the base ofthe socket 19 for the purpose of permitting a limited degree of pivotal movement of the iron head 13 on the end of the shaft 11. 'Ihe pivotal member 24 is preferablylocated transversely to the direction of the vflight ofthe ball, the theoretical location of the pivotal member being in a plane determined by the axis of the shaft 11 and the preferred point of impact 17. I It will thus be observed that in every embodiment the club head 13 is permanently secured to the shaft 11 against rotation on the axis of the shaft. Such rotation would inevitably result in slicing, which it is the purpose ofthe present construction to avoid, and the present structure is also adapted to give long and satisfactory service without loosening of the iron from the shaft. The shaft 11 and hosel 18 are preferably provided with resilient means for cushioning the shock of impact upon the club head 13, which means may consist .of a live rubber member or bushing 26 preferably having a part interposed between the hosel 18 and shaft 11 in the annular chamber 20. The resilient bushing 26 is preferably .formed of soft rubber of the best quality, which is forced into place under compression so that by virtue of the initial strain already placed upon the rubber bushing, the bushing'is adapted to resilientlyresistany relative motion between the upper end of the hosel 18 and the` adjacent part of the'shaft 11. Y 'T Y In the embodiment illustrated in Fig. l, the rubber bushing 26 comprises a substantially cylindrical portion 27 which is adapted to fill a portion of theannular chamber 20 in the hosel 18 and a substantially frusto-conical portion 28 adapted to fill at least a part of a ferrule 29 which encloses the juncture between the hosel 18 and shaft' 11. The bushing 26 is of course provided with an axial bore 30 for receiving the shaft 1l. i

' The golf club 10 is preferably provided with the ferrule 29 for the purpose of enclosing the juncture between the hosel 18 and shaft 11, protecting the rubber bushing 26 andgmaintaining the live rubber under an initial compression which increases the resiliency of the resilient cushion.

' ,'The ferrule 29 may also beapplied to clubs of other types for the purpose of replacing the usual wrapping or other protective device employed at this point. The ferrule 29 Vin this embodiment comprises a tubularmetal member having inner and outer surfaces .of substantially frusto-conical shape, the ferrule tapering from an inner bore 31 of substantially the sar-ne size as the outer diameter ofv shaft 11, to the size of the'end of the hosel 18.

In the embodiment of Fig. 1, the upper end of hosel 18 is provided with a curved surface 32 Vwhich may comprise-a portion of a spherical surface and the adjacent surface33 of the ferrule 29 may be complementary, to form a limited ball and socket connection between these parts. The actual size of the liveL rubber bushing 26 when removed from the hosel 18 and ferrule 29 is slightly greater than that illustratedin the drawings'so that when the parts are assembled as shown'in Fig. 1, the rubber isr underan initial state of compression. The ferrule 29 is retained .in position by a close frictional t of the shaft 1l in the bore 31 and also by virtue of the fact that the diameter of the shaft increases from the lower end toward the top, thereby tending to resist movement of the ferrule to a larger part of .the shaft. v

Referring to' Fig. 3, the modified farm of onstruction illustrated in this figure is substantially the same as that already described, except that in this embodiment the resilient cushioning means is interposed both between the ferrule29 and the hosel 18 and between the` hosel rl-and the shaft 11.,V` 5 y. j v. .-,f

vFor this purpose therupper end 34 ofthe hosel 18 is reduced in diameter, forming an annularl space between the endL 34 and the inner surface of ferrule 2,9. The bushingy26 is provided ,with an annular groove35 adapted tov receive `the end 24l of the h osel 18 and the bushing is provided with a downwardly projecting annular flange 36 adapt; ed to fill the` space between the end of the hosel and the lowerpart of, ferrule 29.` In this Vgolf club the adjacent surfaces of the end of the ferrule 29 and the hoselr 18 need not be formed like a universal joint,but the reduced size of the .hosel the bushing 26fis also provided with an annular,

outwardly projecting flange 37 filling thespacel betweenthe end of the'ferruler 29 and the end of ico the hosel 178,. The balance .of the ferrule' 29 may be fllled with cork, fiber wood or similarmaterial adapted to resist compression and place the bushing 26 under a predetermined degree o-f com.-

pression. 5

In `the embodiment illustratedin Fig. 5,-:t1'1'e4 bushing 26 is ofthe same form as'that illus#y trated` in Fig. 4, but the ferrule v29has been con# structed of some initially plastic material such as pyralin, In thisy club the pyralin ferrule 29 provided with a tapered bore 38 adapted to fit the shaft 11 and the outer surface 39vof the ferrule 29,!nay be tapered to provvide a frustofconicai surface extending from hosel 18 and bushingl 26 to the shaft 11. '5

It should .be understood lthat yany .er the'speeial features illustrated in any of these modifiedforrns, may be substituted for equivalent features in anyk of the other forms.

'Ihe operation of the invention When the club is vused to vstrike a ball in' the usual manner, the impact of the ball on the face 15 of `blade 14 tends to bend the head backward and Ato rotate the head on the axis of the shaft 11. Such rotationof the head is positively resisted bythe direct mechanical connection betweenthe shaft 11 and the head 13, but the form of con'-v nection provided permits relative movement be# tween parts of the hosel 18 andthe shaft 11,

is as follows. .Y

which is resisted by the resilient live rubber cushioning member 26.

In the embodiment of Fig. 5, provision has been made for a limited pivotal movement of the head on the cylindrical member 24, while in the other constructions illustrated, the relative movement takes place by virtue of the bending of the shaft 11 within the annular space 20 of hosel 18.

Fig. 2 illustrates by exaggeration the relative positions of the parts when the head of the club has just struck a ball, and it will be observed that the rear side of the upper end of the hosel 18 approaches the shaft 11 and at the same time the lower end of the ferrule 29 also tends to approach the shaft 11 at this point, compressing the rubber bushing 26. This action takesplace by virtue of the fact that the hosel and ferrule parts are constructed of relatively stiff material which maintains the shape of these parts while the steel shaft 11 is adapted to curve within the hosel and ferrule so that the rear side of the hosel and ferrule extend across a segment of the arc made by the shaft. The term rear as employed in the foregoing sense is applied to that part of the hosel or ferrule which is behind the face or on the left side of the figure in Fig. 2, rather than to that part of the hosel directly opposite to the blade.

In the embodiment of Fig. 5, the relative movement between the hosel and shaft does not depend solely upon the bending of the shaft, but may also take place by virtue o-f the pivotal connection between the shaft and iron head.

'Ihe term iron head in the present specification is employed in the technical sense of a metal golf club head and this term includes metal heads which are preferably constructed of steel rather than ordinary iron.

Golf irons constructed according to the present invention have improved resilient characteristics by virtue of the improved form of connection between the shaft and head, and the major portion of the shock caused by the impact of the ball on the head is absorbed by the live rubber cushion which forms a part of the hosel structure. Such clubs have a, feel which adds materially to the pleasure of the game, renders the clubs more salable and decreases fatigue on the part of the player. The improved construction is also adapted to enclose and protect the juncture of the hosel and shaft, and there is practically no possibility of the club head becoming loosened after a long period of use.

While I have illustrated a preferred embodiment of my invention, many modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention, and I do not Wish to be limited to the precise details of construction set forth, but desire to avail myself of all changes within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is:

1. In a golf club, the combination of a club head having a hosel with a socket, a steel shaft extending into said socket and having its end fixedly secured to said head, a tapered ferrule nxedly secured to said shaft at its small end and having its large end disposed adjacent the end of said hosel to enclose said shaft adjacent said hosel, and a resilient rubber member confined between and separating said ferrule and hosel and adapted to cushion movement of said shaft rela.- tive to said hosel.

2. In a golf club, the combination of a club head having a hosel with a socket, a steel shaft extending into said socket and having its end fixedly secured to said head, a tapered ferrule xedly secured to said shaft at its small end and having its large end disposed adjacent the end of said hosel to enclose said shaft adjacent said hosel, and a resilient rubber member confined between said ferrule and hosel and adapted to cushion movement of said shaft relative to said hosel, said rubber member having an annular flange between said hosel and ferrule and flush with the surfaces of said hosel and'ferrule.

3. In a. golf club, the combination of a club head having a hosel with a socket, a steel shaft extending into said socket and having its end xedly secured to said head, a tapered ferrule firedly secured to said shaft at its small end and having its large end disposed adjacent the end of said hosel toenclose said shaft adjacent said hosel, and a resilient rubber member interposed between said hosel and shaft and between and separating said hosel and ferrule.

4. A golf club comprising a metal head, a hosel thereon, a socket in the hosel, tubular metal shaft having its lower end extending into the socket and fixed thereto in metal-to-metal surface contact, a ferrule having a bore in surface contact with the shaft outwardly of the hosel and fixed to the shaft, the hosel and ferrule having spaced apart parallel adjacent butt ends of substantially equal diameter at right angles to the axis of the shaft, and a washer of softer and flexible material surrounding the shaft with its respective faces in contact with the butt ends of the ferrule and hosel, whereby the washer completely separates the hosel and ferrule, the ferrule tapering upwardly substantially to merge with the periphery of the shaft thereabove.

CHARLES G. JANSKY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3572709 *Oct 14, 1968Mar 30, 1971Risher John DGolf club construction
US3625513 *Aug 2, 1968Dec 7, 1971Brunswick CorpHead-to-shaft connection for golf club
US3999757 *Jul 22, 1975Dec 28, 1976Norstrong Plastics LimitedGolf clubs
US5277423 *Jul 14, 1992Jan 11, 1994Skis Rossignol S.A.Vibration-damping device for an instrument having a shaft and a striking head
US5409229 *Sep 13, 1993Apr 25, 1995Callaway Golf CompanyGolf club head with audible vibration attenuation
US5441264 *May 17, 1994Aug 15, 1995Callaway Golf CompanyIron golf club head with straight, horizontal recess
US5464218 *Jul 7, 1994Nov 7, 1995Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with undercut back cavity and peripheral weighting
US5472203 *May 2, 1994Dec 5, 1995Callaway Golf CompanyIron golf club head with dual intersecting recesses
US5588923 *Apr 6, 1995Dec 31, 1996Callaway Golf CompanyGolf club head with attached selected swing weight composite
US5605511 *Dec 6, 1994Feb 25, 1997Callaway Golf CompanyGolf club head with audible vibration attenuation
US5626530 *Jun 7, 1995May 6, 1997Callaway Golf CompanyGolf club head with sole bevel indicia
US5655975 *Nov 2, 1995Aug 12, 1997Roush Anatrol, Inc.Golf club having vibration damping device and method for making same
US5704849 *Apr 25, 1995Jan 6, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyGolf club head with audible vibration attenuation
US5749795 *Oct 16, 1995May 12, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyIron golf club head with dual intersecting recesses
US5776010 *Jan 22, 1997Jul 7, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyWeight structure on a golf club head
US5935017 *Jun 28, 1996Aug 10, 1999Cobra Golf IncorporatedGolf club shaft
US5935027 *Dec 28, 1995Aug 10, 1999Roush Anatrol, Inc.Multi-mode vibration absorbing device for implements
US6117021 *Dec 24, 1997Sep 12, 2000Cobra Golf, IncorporatedGolf club shaft
US7258623 *Oct 31, 2005Aug 21, 2007Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Method and apparatus for attaching golf club head and shaft
US7819755Feb 4, 2009Oct 26, 2010Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Ferrule and golf club incorporating same
US20050164800 *Jan 28, 2004Jul 28, 2005Wood David A.Golf club head having an alignment marker on its strike face
US20070099719 *Oct 31, 2005May 3, 2007Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Method and apparatus for attaching golf club head and shaft
US20100279787 *Apr 29, 2009Nov 4, 2010John Thomas StitesAngle Adjustment Discontinuities for Golf Clubs
US20130303301 *Jul 19, 2013Nov 14, 2013Nike, Inc.Adjustable connector
USD377818Jan 16, 1996Feb 4, 1997Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with multi-arcuate configuration
USD378113Jan 16, 1996Feb 18, 1997Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with fluted rear side and stepped top wall
USD385933Jan 16, 1996Nov 4, 1997Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with recessed and fluted rear side
USD388851Jan 16, 1996Jan 6, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with recessed and fluted rear side and stepped top wall
USD401651Oct 31, 1997Nov 24, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head and angled hosel
USD402343Oct 31, 1997Dec 8, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head
USD402344Oct 28, 1997Dec 8, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with curved flutes and a curved hosel
USD402722Oct 28, 1997Dec 15, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with flutes and angled hosel
USD407445Mar 10, 1997Mar 30, 1999Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with recessed and curved and fluted rear side
USD414830Oct 28, 1997Oct 5, 1999Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter with angled hosel and recess-intercepting, curved flutes at rear side
USD418566Jul 8, 1997Jan 4, 2000Cobra Golf IncorporatedLower section of a shaft adapted for use in a golf club shaft
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/310
International ClassificationA63B53/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/02
European ClassificationA63B53/02