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Publication numberUS1981026 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1934
Filing dateAug 10, 1931
Priority dateMar 16, 1928
Publication numberUS 1981026 A, US 1981026A, US-A-1981026, US1981026 A, US1981026A
InventorsBlodgett Herbert Cady
Original AssigneeDoor Control Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric door control
US 1981026 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 20, 1934. H c BLQDGETT 1,981,026

ELECTRIC DOOR CONTROL Original Filed March 16, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fi i li l l Ell Tfi

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ELECTRIC DOOR CONTROL Original Filed March 16, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 a r I 1 o H 71 221 W fivenfior: llerberb 0.310190% NOV. 20, 1934. c BLODGETT 1,981,026

ELECTRIC DOOR CONTROL Original Filed March 16, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 NOV. 20, 1934- H, c BLODGETT 1.981,026

ELECTRIC DOOR CONTROL Original Filed March 16, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 iii/mew): fier'berb 1.2 fizbdg w Patented Nov. 20,

PATENT OFFICE 1.08am v "nmc'rmc noon con'raor. Herbert Cady modgemnmrm City, ma, u-.

liner City, Ind.

.- to Door Control Company,

Hartford Original application m1. 1c, 1928, Serial No. 262,308. Divided and this application August 10, 1931, Serial No. 5511,2041v 7 Claims.

This application is a division of application filed March 16, 1928, Serial No. 262,309.

The object of this invention is to provide improved reverse and cut-out means for such a door structure. I

Objects pertaining to details of construction and operation will appear from the description to follow. A structure which is a preferred embodiment of my invention is illustratedin the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a detail perspective view from the inside of a building, with one of my improved electrically controlled door structures installed, the upper inner part of the door track being'broken away.

Fig. 2 is a vertical elevation view showing diagrammatically the relation of the doc the track and the counterbalance means, and my improved controller carriage in position.

80 Fig. 3 is a plan view of the improved controller carriage, carrying track and reversing devices, the traction chain being in dotted lines.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged detail transverse sectional elevation on line 4-4 of Figs. 8 and ii.v showing details of the controller carriageand theslides or runners, portions being indicated by dotted lines.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged detail sectional view taken on line 5-5 of Figs. 3 and 4, the carriage being 80 located at the end of the track in the position in which the door is closed, and portions of the track and door and the connection thereto to the carriage being illustrated.

Fig. 6 is the wiring diagram.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged detail view of the switch actuating means.

The parts will be identified by their numerals of reference which are the same in all the views.

1 is a door made up of horizontal sections ihinged together to travel to the overhead position. 2 is the track with vertical and horizontal parts. 3 is the counter-balance cable disposed over guide pulley 4. 5 is the counter-balance spring connected to guide clevis pulley 51 for the 46 counter-balance cable at one end and to the wall 52 and disposed horizontally above the horizontal portion of the track.

These parts are all substantially shown and described in U. 8. Patent 1,508,886 issued September 16, 1924, to Dautrlck, Johnson and Kraska for overhead door, in which patent will be found complete details not necessary to include here.

6 is the door controller carriage which is electrically driven. 66 The controller carriage 6 comprises the steel frame 61' on which the entire electrical nism ismounted. 62 is a steel top plate or cover for the purpose of carrying a portion of the mechanism, as well as binding the frame together at the'top for-the purpose of strength. 63, 63 are wooden runners secured at each sidev of the carriage and slide on suitable rails. These runners cause the proper amount of friction on the rails to prevent the carriage overrunning. These are properly denominated friction runners. 64 is a link connected at 641 to the carriage and at 642 to the door.

7 is a channel-shaped track for accommodation of the runners 63. '11 is a stiffening channel bar, like track '7, secured back to back to track 70 7 and afiords adjustable attachment for switch levers and trips and the like. 8, 8 are the ,spreaders with clamp bolts for holding the track in position. 72 are the beams above which carry the entire structure, being secured to the ceiling or end walls of the building, as the case may be, this detailnot being here shown. 9 is a stationary sprocket chain carried at its ends by the cross pieces or spreaders 8. 10 are the chain bolts with book ends at each end of the chain. 11 are the springs disposed on the bolts 10- under compression nuts 11' 11 on said bolts, so that the chain '-*yields in either direction bythe compression of ;these springs. This cushions the device and also permits easy starting of the carriage, thus accommodating its action to the action of the electric motor which drives it. Any spring cushion could be provided.

12 is the electric motor supported in carriage 6 and furnishing power for the operation of the said controller carriage. It is of alternating current, and in practice is'adjustable to 110 to 220 volts of the various cycles.

120 is the motor spindle. 121 is a reduction gearing on shaft 121' serving to reduce the motor speed and deliver power to the main gear 122 which is on shaft 137. 133 is the friction drive unit. It consists of the main gear 122 on shaft 137 which provides the drive connection through suitable friction means to the sprocket drive frame to support the shafts for these structures. no

135 18 the the slide.

'channel 71 to cooperate with one end of lever 18 (see diagram Fig. 6).

14, 14 are idler sprocket wheels on shaft 141 disposed in proximity to and coacting with the sprocket wheel 134 and maintain the sprocket chain 9 inproper operative relation to sprocket wheel 134.

It will be seen that if the carriage or the parts which it drives encounter any undue resistance, the friction disks 131 and 132 slip and permit the motor to run without driving the door or the carriage. The door being counterbalanced, very slight power is required and the friction is adjusted to low resistance, thus making it impossible for the door which is counterbalanced to seriously injure anyone because of this frictional connection to the motor which drives it.

The electric connections and controls will be explained in connection with the diagram Fig. 6 along with Figs. 3, 4 and 5. The motor leads are suspended in loops and swing with the carriage and motor as they move back and forth.

15 is the switch panel for the motor which is provided with connections 151, 152, 153 and 154 for the motorleads, 151 and 154 being the running leads, while 152 and 153 are the directional leads which are controlled by the reversing switch to be described. 155 and 156 are the power terminals, and 157 and 158 are the push button terminals. Push buttons 159 at various places serve to control the structure and initiate its operation A manual cut-out switch 159' is provided in proximity to the push buttons so that when it is desired to stop the motor and the door manually, it can be done by cutting oif the power lead manually.

16 is a reversing switch of usual construction.

' 17 is a cut-out switch. 18 is the switch lever connected to the U-channel slide 181 for the purpose of operating the cut-out switch 17. 19 is a switch lever with a U-channel slide 191 connected for operating the reversing switch 16. 20 is a stop means for the switch lever 19 and 21 is a stop means for the switch lever 18. Switch lever 19 is fulcrumed at one end at 192. Switch lever 18 is fulcrumed intermediate its length at 182 (see Fig. 3), and projects at both sides of the control carriage to actuating positions.

These parts are illustrated in Fig. 7. Switch 16 is indicated by dotted lines and its tumbler 161 projects through aperture 193 in slide 191 and is consequently actuated by the movement of Cut-out switch 17 is indicated by dotted lines. Its tumbler 171 projects through aperture 183 in the slide 181 and is engaged and actuated thereby.

22 is a yielding spring trip, disposed upon the to cut out the motor when the door is fully closed. 23 is a similar yielding spring trip disposed on the track to act on the projecting ends of switch lever 19 to reverse the switch and on lever 18 to out out the motor when the door reaches its open position. Because the trip finger yields, the lever, after being tripped by the same, passes the trip, the carriage having sufficient momentum to carry the same by the trip. The details of the tors now on the market.

carried past by the controller carriage and permit travel freely in either direction.

I have described all the parts of my structure and will now briefly indicate their operation. Assume the door to be in'the open position and the carriage at the extreme left of Fig. 3. One of the push buttons is then closed which starts the motor. The end of lever 18 strikes the trip 23 and automatically closes this cut-out, and as the carriage iscarried forward the end of lever 19 strikes the said trip 23 and reverses the reversing switch. This, however, due to the character of the motor, does not reverse the motor until it stops and startsagain, it being necessary for the motor to come to a stop before it can be reversed. The carriage travels, carrying the door to the closing position, and the opposite end of the cut-out lever 18 strikes the spring finger 22 and it is tripped and cuts out the motor, and there is suflicient momentum to carry the door to the completely closed position.

When it is desired to open the door, the push button is again pressed, and because the reversing switch has been reversed the motor starts in the opposite direction and opens the door. As soon as the lever 18' passes the trip finger 22 it cuts the motor in again and it continues to travel until the door is open. The reversing switch lever 19 first strikes the spring finger 23 and throws it to the reverse position, and the end of the lever 18 then strikes the trip 23 and cuts out the motor and stops it, the overrun motion being suflicient to completely open the door.

If, in closing the door, after the door is started in its travel, it is desired to stop it, it can be done by opening the manually controlled cut-out switch 159'. When the door comes to a stop and the cut-out switch 159 is again closed, the motor reverses because the reverse switch had already been reversed when the door started to close. It is thus possible to control the door by manipulation of the manually controlled switches.

This control is possible with a variety of mo- Motors with tickler coils such as appear and are described in Patent No. 1,661,719, issued March 6, 1928, to Edwards lend themselves to such actuation. There arealso motors with switches controlled by centrifugal devices which, after starting in one direction or the other, will continue to run until the motor is stopped and the centrifugal switch disengaged.

If the switch has been reversed, when the motor is next started it will run in the opposite direction.

The control means can be very readily adapted to the usual sliding or swinging doors or any of the multitude of garage door designs and would be of advantage. It is preeminently for an overhead door control. {34;

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In combination, a door, an operating carriage therefor, a track, friction skids on said carriage slidable on said track, an electric motor with reversing coils carried by said carriage, an automatic cut-out and an automatic reversing switch, levers with projecting ends for operating said switches, spring trips disposed along the 1 track to actuate said levers to control the said reverse switch and to operate the cut-out switch, means for closing the circuit to start the motor to initiate the movement of said carriage to secure the operation and control of said automatic cutout and automatic reverse switch, and a manually controlled cut-out switch in the power circuit.

2. In combination, a door, an operating carriage therefor, a track, friction skids on said carriage slidable on. said track, an electric motor with reversing coils carried by said carriage, automatic cut-out and reversing switches, levers with projecting ends for operating the said switches, spring trips disposed along the track to actuate said levers to control the said reverse switch and to operate the automatic cutout switch, and means for closing the circuit to start the motor to initiate the movement of said carriage to secure the operation and control of said automatic cut-out switch and automatic reverse switch.

3. In an electric motor for actuating a door, the combination of a door, a track, a carriage for controlling said door, an electric motor for controlling said carriage, an automatic cut-out and automatic reversing switch on said carriage, levers with projecting ends for operating said switches, reversible spring trips disposed along the track to actuate said levers to control said *automatic reverse switch and automatic cut-out switch, and independent means for closing the circuit to start the motor to initiate the move- =ment 01' said carriage to control said door.

4. In an electric motor for actuating a door, the combination of a door, a track, a carriage for controlling said door, an electric motor for controlling said carriage, automatic cut-out and reversing switches on said carriage, levers with projecting ends for operatng said switches, and reversible spring trips disposed along the track to actuate said levers to control the said automatic reverse switch and automatic cut-out switch.

5. In an electric motor for actuating a door, the combination of a door, a track, a carriage for controlling said door, an electric motor for controlling said carriage, automatic cut-out and reversing switches on said carriage, and reversible trips disposed along the track to actuate said reverse switch and said cut-out switch.

6. In an electric motor for actuating a door, the combination of a door, a track, a carriage for controlling said door, an electric motor for controlling said carriage, an automatic cut-out switch on the said carriage, a lever with projecting ends for operating said switch, and reversible spring trips disposed along the track to actuate said lever to control the said cut-out switch.

7. In an electric motor for actuating a door, the combination of a door, a track, a carriage for controlling said door, an electric motor for controlling said carriage, an automatic cut-out switch on the said carriage, and reversible trips disposed along the track to actuate said cut-out switch.

HERBERT CADY BLODGE'I'I.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2533116 *May 1, 1946Dec 5, 1950Felton S JenkinsControl system for doors
US2625390 *Aug 16, 1948Jan 13, 1953Mcfadden John DElevating mechanism for overhead doors
US2633353 *Aug 15, 1950Mar 31, 1953Meek Orie LOverhead door for filling stations and the like
US2690908 *Feb 9, 1952Oct 5, 1954Vernon E CoitGarage door actuator
US2695781 *Aug 28, 1950Nov 30, 1954Wark James GordonAutomatic door operating mechanism
US2790635 *Jun 10, 1953Apr 30, 1957Charles R EvansOperating mechanism for sectional garage doors
US6719032 *Oct 5, 2000Apr 13, 2004Edward MiersShutter with articulated elements equipped with an electrical driving device
US7748167 *Jun 5, 2003Jul 6, 2010Sommer Antriebs-Und Funktechnik GmbhDrive device
Classifications
U.S. Classification318/266, 49/358, 160/193
International ClassificationE05F15/16
Cooperative ClassificationE05F15/1653, E05Y2600/46, E05Y2800/00, E05Y2201/434, E05Y2900/106
European ClassificationE05F15/16B9B