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Publication numberUS1981379 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1934
Filing dateApr 8, 1933
Priority dateApr 8, 1933
Publication numberUS 1981379 A, US 1981379A, US-A-1981379, US1981379 A, US1981379A
InventorsJohn F Mulhern, John M Thomson
Original AssigneeJohn F Mulhern, John M Thomson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Exercising appliance
US 1981379 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov..20, 1934. J. M, THOMSON ET AL 1,981,379

EXERCISING APPLIANCE Filed April 8, 1935 {NVENTOR B I WHORNEY Patented Nov. 20, 1934 UNITED STATES EXERCISING APPLIANCE John M. Thomson and John F. Mulhern,

' New York, N. Y.

Application April 8, 1933, Serial No. 665,128

9 Claims.

This invention relates to exercising devices, and more particularly, to a device or appliance for exercising the feet and legs, or massaging or manipulating the bones of the feet.

An important feature of the present invention is the provision of an appliance on which the user may stand, and by the simple act of rocking from the heels to the toes not only exercise the muscles of the feet and legs but also, by applying pressure to the arch and metatarsal arch, tend to restore the positions of the bones in the vicinities of these arches to their naturaland proper positions, and, at the same time by such movements and manipulations, remove lime or chalky deposits gathered on the metatarsals, the phalanges, and the bones adjoining the middle cuneiform.

The appliance of the present invention is intended to correct fallen arches, strengthen the bony structure Y of the foot, and build and strengthen leg and foot muscles. The proper use of the appliance of the present invention creates grace and ease in walking and improves posture and carriage of the body. The exercise of the leg and foot and manipulation of the foot bones tend to eliminate stiffness, pains and aches, and also other bodily disorders resulting from chalky or lime deposits on the bony structures of the foot.

In the form at present preferred, the appliance of the present invention comprises a base portion and two pairs of mounds or domes arranged on the base in parallel form; the base and mounds being formed preferably of sponge rubber. One

mound of each set is substantially larger than the other and it is intended that the users feet be placed on the appliance so that a large mound is directly under the arch of each foot. The smaller mounds are spaced from the larger ones at such a distance that they will be engaged by the metatarsal arches. The base is provided with portions at the front and rear to be engaged by the toes and heels of the user when the feet are rocked in the manner referred to below in the use of the device.

Other features and advantages will hereinafter appear.

In the accompanying drawing- Figure l is a top plan view of the appliance of this invention. a

Fig. 2 is a side elevation. Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken through one' pair of mounds.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view showing a modification of the mound shown in the other views.

Fig. 5 is a side elevation of the appliance, showing the bones of the users foot in the position the foot assumes when rocking forward on the metatarsal arch mound.

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 5, but showing the foot in the position rockingv backward on the arch mound.

Fig. '7 is a plan view, showing the positions of the mounds laterally relative to the foot bones.

The appliance of the present invention, in the form shown in the accompanying drawing, com- 7 prises a base 10 which is preferably made of resilient material such as sponge rubber. On this base there are provided mounds 11, 12, 13 and 14. The mounds l1 and 12 form one "pair and the mounds 13 and 14 form the other pair, and the pairs are arranged in parallel rows as shown.

These mounds are also preferably made of sponge rubber. The front of the base has a margin 15 between the mounds- 12 and 14 and the front edge of the base, and the back of the base has portions 16 behind the mounds 1 1 and 13.

In use, the appliance is intended to be placed on the floor so that the user may stand upon the appliance'with each foot over one pair of mounds with the heels of his feet in the margin 16 which, as shown in Fig. 1, may be extended beyond the rear edge 1'7 so as to assist the user in properly placing his feet on the mounds. When this is done, the mounds 11 and 13 will be located directly underthe arch A while the mounds 12 and 14 will be located directly under the metatarsal arch M, and the mounds 1112 and 1314 will be 'onthe longitudinal axes of the feet respectively.

In order that thiscondition may be obtained for feet of different lengths, the mounds 12 and Ham made adjustable relative to the base 10. For this purpose, each of the mounds 12 and 14 is provided with a plug 18 which may be placed in one of a series of holes 19 at different distances from the rear mounds 11 and 13. Thelatt'er may also be made separate from the base 10 if desired and may be adjustable, but, since adjustment of the front mounds is sufficient, it is preferable that the rear mounds 11 and 13 be integral, cemented, or otherwise secured to the base 10. 1 j

The mounds 11 and 13 are substantially larger 100 than the mounds 12 and 14, and this provision is made because the bones of the arch are much larger and stronger than the bones of the metatarsal arch.

The appliance is intended to be used as follows. 105 After the user has placed his feet on the appliance so that the larger mounds 11 and 13 are located under the arches of his feet, the user shifts his Weight forwardly so as to stand on his toes, and,

,of course, at the same time lifting his heels and arches upwardly and off the mounds 11 and 13, as shown in Fig. 5. In rocking forwardly, his weight is applied largely on the front mounds l2 and 14 which, as a result, mushroom somewhat, but nevertheless are resistant enough to press upwardly against the phalange and metatarsal joints. This pressure at these points on the metatarsal arch tends to spread the bones, not only exercising the muscles and tissues holding the bones together but also permitting the bones to realign themselves in their natural and intended order.

Then the user rocks backwardly taking his weight off the toes and transferring it to the heels. In doing so, the users weight is shifted to the large mounds 11 and 13 as shown in Fig. 6 which, being under compression, spread somewhat but nevertheless exert a reaction or upward pressure on the middle cuneiform MC and bones adjoining the same, including especially the scaphoid S. This pressure on the arch, as with the metatarsal arch, causes the bones to bespread giving them an opportunity to realign themselves in the natural Way, and, at the same time, also exercises and stimulates the. muscles and tissues around these bones.

; .Ihepersonusing the appliance continues rocking back and forth placing his weight first on the heels and then on the toes so long as not fatigued by the exercise.

The spreading or mushrooming of the mounds massages and manipulates the tissues of the foot under the arches andthe pressure applied tends to remove the lime or chalky deposits which :gather'on the joints of the arch bones.

In addition to exercising and manipulating the foot, the rocking to and fro on the mounds'ialso exercises and stimulates, the tibia, fibula, and

pelvis joints and the muscles controlling the same.

, The appliance and the exercise above referred to may be employed either. alone or with other exercises suchas bending at the waistv simultane- 'and-a spring 20 or other resilient member may be inserted in this bore. When this is done, the

upper end of the spring should have a cap, 21

fitting the inner end of the bore while the lower :end maybe supported on a disk 22 and all the metal orgextra parts held in the bore by a plug 23 of rubber or the like,

, The base 10 may, of course, be made of material other than the material of which the mounds are made, but it is preferable that it be made of ,sponge rubber so that when rocking back on the heel, the oscalsis'will be cushioned.

. In connection with Figs. 5 and 6. it should be understood that these. show substantially the terminal positions of the foots movement. During the movement between these positions, greater "weight is applied to the mounds and they are :substantially flattened at times.

f :Other variations and modifications may be made within the scope of this invention and portions of the improvements may be used without others.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and for which it is desired to obtain Letters Patent, is:--

A foot exercising appliance comprising a base;'=and two pairs of mounds rising from and fixedly mounted on the base, each pair being adapted to receive and support a human foot, the mounds of each pair being spaced from each other to respectively engage the arch and the metatarsal arch of the foot, said mounds being dome-shaped and being adapted to engage the foot on the longitudinal axis thereof.

2. A foot exercising appliance comprising a base; and two pairs of mounds rising from and fixedly mounted on the base, each pair being adapted to receive and support a human foot,

the mounds of each pair being spacedfrom each other to respectively engage the arch and the metatarsal arch of the foot, the mound which engages the metatarsal arch being dome-shaped mounds of each 'pair beingspaced fromeach'other to respectively engage the arch and the metatarsal :arch or the foot, the mound which engages the arch being dome-shaped and in engagement with the foot in the vicinity of the scaphoid bringing pressure to bear .on the bones adjoining the middle cuneiform when' the weight of the .user is applied to the fore'part-of the foot.

"4. A foot exercising appliance comprising a base; and two pairs of mounds rising from and fixedly mounted on the-base, each pair being adapted to receive and support :a human foot, the mounds .of .each pair being spaced from each other to respectively engage the arch and the metatarsal arch of the foot, the mound which engages the metatarsal arch being dome-shaped and in engagement with the foot in the vicinity .of the second phalange and metatarsal joint tending to spread the phalange and metatarsal joints when the weight of the user is applied to thefore part of the foot and the mound which engages the arch being dome-shaped andin engagement with the foot in the vicinity of the scaphoidbringmiddle cuneiform when the weight of the user .is applied to the fore part of the foot.

'5. A foot exercising appliance comprising a JbBiSELtWO pairs of mounds rising from and fixedly mounted on the base, each-pairbeing adapted to receive andsupport ahuman foot, the mounds of each pair being spaced from each other to respectively engage the arch and the metatarsal arch 'of the vfoot alternately whenthe users Weight is shifted from his toes to his heels in exercising; and means on the base beyond the mounds for engaging the toes and heels of the users'feet to support the latter in the terminal position of the weight shifting movements.

6. A foot exercising appliance comprising a base; and two pairs of mounds on the base, each pair being adapted to receive and support a 'human foot, the mounds ofe'ach pair being spaced from each other to respectively engage the arch and the metatarsal arch of the foot,"the mounds .ing. pressure to bear .on the bones adjoining the being dome-shaped and'being made of a resilientlyrdisplaceable material to spread under the users weight and apply pressure on the overlying bones and simultaneouslykneading the adjacent tissues and muscles."

.7. A foot exercising appliance comprising a base; and two pairsof 'moundson thebase, each pair being adapted to receive and support a human foot, the mounds of each pair being spaced from each other to respectively engage the arch and the metatarsal arch of the foot, one mound of each pair having a plug and a plurality of sockets in the base to receive the plug whereby the mound may be held in a variety of positions on the base to vary the distances between the mounds in each pair.

8. A foot exercising appliance comprising a base; and two pairs of mounds on the base, each pair being adapted to receive and support a human foot, the mounds of each pair being spaced from each other to respectively engage the arch and the metatarsal arch of the foot, at least one mound in each pair being made of sponge rubber and having auxiliary means for increasing its resistance to compression.

9. A foot exercising appliance comprising a arch and the arch with the longitudinal axis of p the foot as the users weight is shifted and as a result of the deformation of said mounds when receiving the user's weight.

JOHN M. THOMSON. JOHN F. MULHERN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2465725 *Apr 8, 1947Mar 29, 1949Maurice H HerzmarkFoot exerciser pad
US2638088 *Nov 24, 1950May 12, 1953Robert F JohnsonAppliance for massaging and exercising human feet
US3636946 *Oct 30, 1969Jan 25, 1972Hardy Peter SExercising apparatus
US3641601 *Apr 30, 1969Feb 15, 1972William F SiegSimulated walker, jogger, and running exerciser
US4109661 *Nov 3, 1976Aug 29, 1978Tatsuo FukuokaFootwear having pressure projections
US4210134 *Aug 10, 1978Jul 1, 1980Kabushikigaisha OmcoPillow for manual therapeutics
US4233966 *Dec 11, 1978Nov 18, 1980Takahashi George KAppliance for use in acupressure therapy
US5080090 *Sep 4, 1990Jan 14, 1992Liau Yo ChongMassage mat of self-service type for use in stimulating the circulatory system of a human body
US5096188 *Jan 22, 1991Mar 17, 1992Shen Chin BiaoGait training board with magnets
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Classifications
U.S. Classification606/237, 482/51, 601/27, 601/28
International ClassificationA63B23/10, A61H7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B23/10, A61H7/001, A61H2201/1284
European ClassificationA63B23/10