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Publication numberUS1981533 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1934
Filing dateSep 19, 1932
Priority dateSep 19, 1932
Publication numberUS 1981533 A, US 1981533A, US-A-1981533, US1981533 A, US1981533A
InventorsSenn Williams Joseph
Original AssigneeMallory & Co Inc P R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric condenser
US 1981533 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 20, 1934. J s, WILLIAMS 1,981,533

ELECTRIC CONDENSER Filed Sept. 19, 1952 INVENTOR Y www n ATT RN EY5 Patented Nov. 2i), 1934 PATENT OFFICE ELECTRIC CONDENSEI.'

Joseph Senn. Williams, Indianapolis, Ind., as-

signor to P. R. Mallory &. Co., Incorporated, Indianapolis, Ind., a corporation of Indiana Application September 19, 1931, Serial No. 633,734 9 claims. (o1. 175415) This invention relates to electric condensers or capacitors and particularly to so-called dry electrolytic condensers or capacitors of the wound type. y I The object of the invention generally is to provide an improved condenser of the character indicated which is efficient, economical, readily manufactured and is adapted to provide a relatively high capacitance in a relatively small space.

More specifically, it is an object to provide a socalled dry electrolytic condenser in the form of a cartridge or packet having an envelope or casing carrying the terminals arranged so that the device may be readily inserted and connected for use in a large variety of electric appliances, for example, in radio receivers, power-packs, and the like.

It is also an object to provide an insulating envelope or sleeve having ilaps on the end to fold over Vand completely encase the condenser, certain of the liaps being arranged to carry the terminals in a safe and economical manner.

It is a further object to provide an improved construction for the body of a wound condenser in the form of a metallic shroud which encases the parts in a safe and convenient manner.

Other objects of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the features of construction, combination of elements, and arrangement of parts, which will be exemplifled in the construction hereinafter set forth and the scope of the application of which willbe indicated in the claims.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be had to 4the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig` lis a perspective view of a condenser constructed in accordance `with the invention, the

flap carrying the terminals being `partially opened;

Fig. 2 is a view partly in elevation and partly in section showing the iiap which carries the terminal in open position;

Fig. 3 is a View partly in elevation and partly in section showing the construction of the condenser proper without its casing; and

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary view mainly in section showing theila'p construction which carries the terminals.

Referringnow. to the drawing, 10 denotes generally the body of a condenser that is slipped into 55 an insulating envelope or casing 11, here l,indiinvention .in the form of an extended metallic cated in the form of a prismatic tube or box with iiaps at the end adapted to be folded over so as to enclose totally the body of the condenser within the same. The prismatic envelope here shown has four sides, so that the ends may have as many as four flaps. While the lower end indicated at 12in Fig. 2 may have 'four flaps, it, as well as the upper end which is designed to carry the terminals, preferably has but three. Thevsideflaps of the upper end, shown at 13 and 14, are designed to fold inwardly and slightly over-lap as they close the end of the casing. The back flap 15 is designed to fold over the flaps 13 and 14 when folded down in place, the back flap being further extended at 16 to provide a tongue adapted to enter the slit between the aps 13 and 14 and the side which has no flap; this tongue when so inserted engaging frictionally with the inside wall of the front side of the casing, so thatwhen in place the box remains permanently closed. The 75 casing may be made from any suitable sheet material of an insulating character, for example a sheety of fiber impregnated with an insulating oil or wax. The dimensions `of the casing are such that the sides arerelatively close to the body of condenser 10 when disposed therein. While this condenser body is of the wound type, that is, in the form of a roll or cylindrical body comprising conducting plate electrode elements 17 and 17' separated bydielectric material 18 and wound upon a central supporting column 19, it is preferred that such cylindrical body shall undergo a certain amount of deformation to flatten the sides, whereby the interior space of the casing 11 is filled more economically by the condenser body, reducing the clearance, which has no' commercial advantage, that obtains on the interior along the fourcorner edges of the casing.

105 tube of a. diameter initially suicient to permit the condenser roll just to be slid in place. Themetallic tube here shown is of the thin-walled, colllapsible type and has a closed`- lower end 21 and may be made from any suitable material, for ex- 11o 20 has been properly drawn over Ithe .condenser roll, a pair of strip-like flexible terminal `electrodes22 and 22"--will project from the open end of the tube. These strip-like terminal electrodes may initially be provided as extensions yof the conducting plates or sheets, out of which the condenser roll is made, or they may be. conducting strips that are attached tothe plate electrode elements in any'suitable manner.' The condenser body when suitably enshrouded is sealed in the sheath 20 by means of a filling of insulating-maf terial 23 that is originally plastic and soft, but when put in place and dried or cooled becomes hard. A suitable plastic insulating material for this purpose is that known as Parolite,

The body of the condenser 10 when in place-in the insulating casing 11 preferablyrests on the lower'end 12. The upper end, however is preferably somewhat short of the upper end of the casing 1'1. In the clearance space thus afforded between the upper en'd of the condenser body 10 and the casing 11,.-connecting means are provided for making electrical connections 4between the` strip-like terminals 22 and 22' 'and lthose carried by the flap 15. These latter are show-n at 25 and 25' and comprise rigid conducting elements preferably in the 'form of L shaped members having perforated bases that are secured j-,by means of rivets or eyeletsto the conducting strips 22 and 22', respectively.

In order tofmake these electrical connections within the clearance space in the wrapper in a manner which protects the connections so that they are not liable to be short-circuited and at the same time-are convenient to manufacture, ad-` ditional insulating ballles or strips are slipped into this space. The rst insulating baille to be slipped into place is a strip bent intothe form of an L, as shownatf27 in Fig. 4, that is inserted behind the conducting strip 22' which .comes out from the condenser body nearest to the centerof readily folded down in the same. This baille may press the conducting strip a little' way out toward the front of the box, but is of a height not in excess of that of the clearance space, so that the -ap 15 may be place without .resistance from this baille. A

Over the top of the conducting strip 22 is slipped a second baffle member 28' in the form of a rectangular insulating sheet that loosely ts in the top of the casing. The conducting strip 22 is now laid along the inner side ofthe flap 15, a reinforcing strip of insulating materi l 151 being preferably interposed for stiffexiing purposesl A conducting washer and eyelet :29 is then inserted and crimped into place passingv through the strip 22', the strip 151, the flap 15 and the perforated base 26 on the exterior of the flap 15. Y

Similar connections are provided for the conducting strip 22, but first an L shaped linsulating baille 30 is inserted which is preferably larger than the insulating baille 27, this'baille having its sides almost large enough to llthef open end of the clearance space in the casing 11 and when in place and the flap 15 closed, i's no longer L shaped, but'v shaped,the two sides being inclined at-a relatively small angle. When the balfle 30 has been slipped into place, the conducting strip 22 is laid carefully thereove'r and up' along`the side that projects over the flap 15. VThis is perforated at a point to one side of thatwhere connection between the 'terminall 25 and conducting strip 22 was made, and a second conducting .electrically connected to said washer and eyelet 31 pushedv therethrough. This passes through not only the conductingv strip 22,

but also the overlying -ap of baille 30, the-strip or stiener 151, the ilap 15 and the perforated base 26 of the terminal 25. It is thus seen that 13 and 14 are bent into overlapping position4 across the top of the casing 11, and then the flap 15 is bent downwardly and the tongue 16` inserted to make frictional contact with the front wall of the casing. Thus a box-likey condenser is provided in an insulating envelope substantially protecting the condenser body, while -the terminal electrodes are in a position to be conveniently attached to electrical, conductors connecting the condensers in an electrical circuit. If for any reason it is desired to examine the condition of the condenser, .the condenser may be detached and the ap 15 pulled open, the connections inspected and the condition of the interior of the box ascertained; this will, in generalfdisclose whether or not the condenser is in proper working order. It is also seen that by enshrouding the condenser body in the metallic sheath 20, the condenser body is further protected. In the preferred lform of acollapsible aluminum tube, this sheath furnishes complete protection against access :of moisture or gases `from the surrounding air to the condenser roll. In the event, however, that gas should generate within the condenser roll, this can find relief t0 some extent by causing distention of the collapsible aluminum tube, and if that is `not suflicient, by causing the metallic sheath tofbr'eak away'from the sealing material 23 in the end of the condenser, permitting the gas to escape Without otherwise injuring the condenser. The use of such collapsible aluminum -tubes enables these objects to be accomplished without .materially increasing the cost over merely encasing the condenser roll in a cardboard container.

Since certain changes may be made in the above construction and different embodiments o f the invention could be made without departing from the scope thereof, it is intended that al1 matter contained in the above ldescription or shown in the accompanying drawing Ashall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

. 130 Having described my invention, what I claim closing said body, and terminal connectionsy mounted on the exterior of one of said ilaps strips on the interior of said envelope.

2. In an electrical condenser, the combination with a body provided with flexible terminal conducting strips, of a prismatic insulating envelope having foldable flaps at the ends for totally enclosing said body, insulating baffles inserted at one end of said envelope insuring the electrical separationof said terminal strips, and rigid terminal connections on the exterior of one of said ilaps electrically connected to said strips on the interior of said envelope.

3. In an electrical condenser, the combination with a body provided with flexible terminal conducting strips, of a prismatic insulating envelope having foldable flaps at the ends for totally enclosing said body, insulating bailies inserted at one end of said envelope insuring the electrical separation of said terminal strips, rigid conducting members having perforated bases disposed in spaced relation on the exterior of a flap at one end, and conducting securing means passing through said' perforated bases and making electrical contact individually with said terminal strips on the interior side of said flap.

4. In an electrical condenser, the combination with a condenser body provided with' terminals, of a metallic sheath for said body in the form of a tube'closed at the bottom and dimensioned to fit snugly about the sides, hardened plastic insulating material about said terminals sealing said body in the open end of said sheath, a prismatic envelope having foldable flaps at the ends for totally enclosing said sheathed body, and rigid terminals on the exterior of one flap at one end electrically connected to said terminals on the interior of said envelope.

5. In an electrical condenser, the combination with a condenser body provided with terminals, of a metallic sheath for saidvbody in the form of a tube closed at the bottom and dimensioned to lit snugly about the sides, hardened plastic insulating material about said terminals sealing said body in the open end of said sheath, a pris-v matic envelope having foldable flaps atthe ends totally enclosing said sheathed body and of a length adapted to provide a narrow clearance at the terminal end of said body, insulating baf-- fies inserted in said space arranged to insure electrical separation of said terminals, and rigid terminals on the exterior of one flap at one end.

electrically connected to the rst said terminals on the interior of said envelope.

6. In an electrical condenser, the combination with a condenser body provided withterminals, of a metallic sheath for said body in the form of a tube closed at the bottom and dimensioned to t snugly about the sides, hardened plastic insulating material about said terminals sealing said body in the open end of said sheath, a prismatic envelope having foldable flaps at the ends totally enclosing said sheathed body and of a length adapted to provide a narrow clearance at the terminal end of said body, insulating baffies inserted in said space arranged to insure electrical separation of said terminals, a stifiening strip on the outermost flap at the clearance l end of said envelope, said terminals being led out to lie over said stiffening strip and having a portion of one insulating baille extending therebetween, rigid conducting L shaped members having perforated bases disposed on the ex- A terior of said outermost flap, and conducting securing means passing through said perforated bases and said terminal extensions overlying said stiffening strip whereby the terminals on the exterior of said flap make electrical. contact with those on the interior of said envelope.

7. In'an electrical condenser, the combination with a condenser 'body provided with flexible terminalv conductors, o f a prismatic insulating envelope having foldable flaps at the ends for enclosing said body, and substantially rigid terminal connections mounted on the exterior of one of said flaps electrically connected to said conductors to provide said enclosed condenser body with external terminals.

8. In an electrical condenser, the combination of an fencased condenser body provided With flexible terminal conductors extending from the case, a prismatic insulating envelope having foldable flaps at the ends 'for enclosing said encased body, and vsubstantially rigid terminal connections mounted on the exterior of one of said ilaps electrically connected to said conductors to provide said enclosed and encased condenser body with external terminals.

9. In an electrical condenser, the combination of a condenser body `sealed within a case provided With flexible terminal conductors extending from said case, a prismatic insulating .envelope having-foldable flaps at the ends for enclosing said encased body, and substantially rigid terminal connections mounted on the vexterior of one of said flaps electrically connected to said conductors to provide said enclosed and encased condenser body with external terminals.

' JOSEPH SENN WILLIAMS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2529653 *Jun 11, 1947Nov 14, 1950Louis R DumanTerminal strip for electromagnets
US6040078 *Oct 26, 1998Mar 21, 2000Mitsubishi Chemical CorporationFree form battery apparatus
US6063520 *Mar 12, 1997May 16, 2000Mitsubishi Chemical CorporationLightweight battery container and method for fabrication of same
US6224995Jun 25, 1999May 1, 2001Mitsubishi Chemical CorporationThree dimensional free form battery apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification361/538, 429/163
International ClassificationH01G9/10
Cooperative ClassificationH01G9/10
European ClassificationH01G9/10