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Publication numberUS1981647 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1934
Filing dateJan 4, 1852
Publication numberUS 1981647 A, US 1981647A, US-A-1981647, US1981647 A, US1981647A
InventorsSigfrid W. Johnson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bottle carrier
US 1981647 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 20, 1934.

S. W. JC'HNSON BOTTLE CARRIER Filed Jan. 4, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet l.

NW. 20, 1934. s. w. JOHNSON 1,981,647

BOTTLE CARRIER Filed Jan. 4, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Nov. 20, 1934 BOTTLE CARRIER Sigfrid W. Johnson, Toledo, Ohio, assignor to Owens-ois Glass of Ohio Application January 4,

4 Claims.

7 The present invention relates to improvements in bottle carriers and has for an object the provision of a comparatively inexpensive medium for use in transporting bottled beverages from the store to the home as well as for counter display of the beverages. To this end the carrier consists of a single sheet of flexible material such, for example, as heavy paper or fibre board scored to provide a bottom and a pair of opposed side walls, said side walls having hand receiving openings at their upper ends. A retaining band encircles the walls in proximity to the bottom of the carrier and secures bottles against accidental displacement. Such construction provides a simple and reliable carrier as well as a novel and effective counter display medium, the latter being created by folding one of the sidewalls downwardly to expose the upper portions of the bottled beverages.

other objects will be in part apparent and part pointed out hereinafter.

In the drawings;

Fig. 1 is a perspective view showing the bottle carrier adapted to accommodate a single row of bOtt1 Fig. 2 is a perspective view illustrating the manner in which the carrier may be employed as a counter display medium.

Fig. 3 is a horizontal sectional view through 3% the carrier and bottles supported therein.

mg. i is a plan view of the carrier forming blank.

Fig. 5 is an edge view showing the bottle carrier blank folded for storage or shipment.

Fig. 6 is an end view of the carrier showing the side walls notched to prevent excessive downward movement of the retaining band.

Fig. 7 is a perspective view showing a bottle carrier adapted to accommodate two rows of 46 bottles.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view showing the carrier used as a counter display medium.

Fig. 9 is a perspective view illustrating the manner in which portions of the side walls are folded inwardly over the upper ends of the bottles to facilitate stacking or piling of the carriers one upon the other. D

Fig. 10 is a plan view of the scored and cut blank representing the carrier shown in Figs. 7,

5 8, and 9.

Fig. 11 is a detail sectional view showing a metal clip covering the upper wall of the hand receiving opening.

Fig. 12 shows another form of hand receiving opening in which a tongue is formed on the Company, a corporation 1932, Serial No. 584,658

upper wall and terminates short of the extreme ends thereof.

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary elevational view show ing another form of connector for the side walls.

Fig. 14 is a sectional plan view 'thereof.

In one form or the invention (Figs. 1 to 6 inclusive) the bottle carrier is designed for use in transportation and/or counter display of a single row of bottles. Broadly, the carrier consists of a bottom and a pair of opposed side walls, the upper ends of which may be separably secured together and provided with hand receiving openings. This creates an open ended carrier through which the contents may be viewed. Suitable means such, for example, as a retaining band encircling the opposed walls in proximity to the bottom may be employed to secure the bottles or other articles against accidental displacement and hold the side walls in snug contact with the bottles.

Specifically, the form of bottle carrier Just referred to consists of a sheet 15 of fibre board, heavy paper, or similar flexible material of considerably greater length than breadth. A pair of transverse score lines 16 near the center of the sheet define the longitudinal margins of the bottom 17. A score line 18 parallel with and centrally disposed between these marginal score lines 16 indicates the point at which the sheet 15 may be folded when the carrier is not in use. A score line 19 substantially midway the length of one side wall 20 and parallel with the other score lines, locates the point of folding the side wall when the carrier is to be used for counter display of bottled beverages or the like. Near the opposite ends of the sheet 15 transverse score lines 21 are provided. These score lines 21 permit arrangement of the extreme upper end portions of the side walls in parallel relation and in contact with each other to facilitate handling of the carrier. Hand receiving openings 22 are formed in the side walls 20 just below the uppermost score line 21. Tongues 23 are provided at the upper margins of the hand receiving openings 22, said tongues adapted to be folded upwardly at one side of the carrier. It will be observed that with the two tongues disposed in contact with each other and extending upwardly alongside one of the walls, the thickness of the portion to be gripped is considerably increased and therefore provides an exceptionally convenient means for holding the carrier without discomfort.

In order that the side walls 20 may be held in firm engagement with bottles 3 or other articles, and positively secure the latter against ill! .strip of flexible material such as heavy paper adapted to have its ends glued together and/or to one of the side walls. v

In Fig. 6 the vertical edges of the side walls 20 are provided with notches 25 adapted to provide seats for the retaining band 24 and thereby hold the latter against vertical movement beyond a predetermined point. Thus satisfactory cooperation between the retaining band and remaining portions of the carrier is assured.

when the carrier is to be employed for counter display of bottled beverages, the upper portion of the side wall 20 in which the score 19 is provided, is folded outwardly and downwardly about the score. Preferably, that portion of the wall beyond the outer score line 21 is placed beneath the botttom 17 with the result that the weight of the botttles materially assists in holding the downwardly folded portion of the wall in the position shown in Fig. '2. The downwardly folded portion as well as the inner surface of the other wall may well be provided with suitable advertising matter.

In Figs. 7 to 10 inclusive, I have shown a form of bottlevcarrler adapted to accommodate two parallel rows of bottles. This form of carrier consists of a sheet of heavy paper or fibre board of considerably greater length than breadth. Two score lines 26 extending transversely of the cen- .tral portion of the sheet define the side edges of a botttom 27 and the lower ends of side walls 28. At the upper end of each side wall there is formed a pair of parallel score lines 29 spaced apart a distance substantially equal to one-half the width of the bottom 27. These score lines 29 are spaced inwardly a short distance from the extreme upper end of the side walls 23 providing flaps 30 in which hand receiving openings 31 are formed.- That portion 32 of the sheet between the score lines 29 is intended at times to be used as a cover as shown in Fig. 9. In forming each hand re-. ceiving opening 31, a substantially U-shaped cut is made in the corresponding flap 30 and. that portion of the sheet within the outline defined by the cut is folded outwardly to form a tongue 33. The two tongues 33 together with the flaps 30 provide a handle or grip which has sufilcient thickness to permit one to hold the carrier without discomfort. A retaining band 34 is adapted to encircle the two side walls 28 to hold them in snug engagement with the packaged bottles as well as to prevent premature movement of the bottles through the open ends of the carrier.

a perfectly flat supporting surface upon which another carrier may be placed.

In order that this form of carrier may be used for counter display of beverages contained in the bottles B, one side wall 28 is provided with an intermediate score line 35 extending transversely thereof at a point just above the surface which is and preferably is substantially U-shaped in cross section. I This clip may be formed of metal and provides a rounded surface on the handle which may be gripped without discomfort.

For the purpose of providing an exceptionally strong handle for the bottle carrier, the hand receiving opening 31 (Fig. 12) is substantially semi-circular and includes a tongue 3'7 or flap at its upper side. This flap is somewhat shorter than the wall from which it extends and each end portion'of this wall is formed on a radius and merges into the remaining portion of the wall or the opening. Thus it will be observed that the tongues orflaps 37 will provide a comfortable grip. Also by rounding the comers as stated, there is less tendency of the walls to tear than where the corners are perfectly square.

In Figs. 13 and 14 the construction is such that the necessity for a retaining band is avoided. Tongues 38 or fingers, are formed integral with the vertical edges of the side walls 28, at points corresponding with the operating position of the retaining band 34, said tongues or fingers having opposed notches 39 therein so that they may be interlocked and secure the side walls in the desired position and prevent endwise displacement of the bottles B. Thus the entire bottle carrier may be formed from a single sheet. of paper or fiber board. v From the foregoing it will be apparent that the present invention provides a comparatively inexpensive bottle carrier which in addition to supplying a reliable means for transporting bottled beverages from the store to the home, may be usedto advantage for counter display of the beverages.

Modifications may be resorted to within the 12) I spirit and scope of theappended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A bottle carrier and display medium formed from a sheet of flexible material and comprising a bottom, a pair of opposed side walls, said side walls being scored transversely near their upper ends to provide flaps, said flaps adapted to be disposed in parallel relation and centrally above the bottom at times, a handle consisting of aligned hand receiving openings in said flaps, one of said side walls having aptransverse score line substantially midway its height and adapted to be folded outwardly and downwardly about said score line to display the contents of the carrier, the flap on said folded wall being extended beneath the bottom of the carrier, and a band encircling and constricting a part of the carrier just above the bottom thereof and holding the bottles against relative movement in said carrier.

2. A bottle carrier comprising an elongated 140 rectangular sheet of flexible material scored and folded to provide a bottom and opposed vertical side walls, a handle constituting an integral part of the two side walls and disposed centrally above a said bottom, and means connecting the adjacent 145 vertical edges of the side walls and closing only a minor portion of the open ends of the carrier whereby to expose to view bottles therein, said means constricting a part of the carrier above and relative to the bottom and thereby causing 150 no i portions of the side walls to firmly engage certain areas of the bottles and hold them against relative movement in the carrier.

3. A bottle" carrier comprising an elongated substantially rectangular sheet of flexible material scored and folded to form a solid bottom, a pair of opposed side walls extending upwardly from opposed margins of said bottom, a handle connecting the upper ends of said walls, and means connecting the adjacent vertical margins of the side walls but closing only a portion of the opposed ends of the carrier whereby to expose to view articles therein, said means constituting an endless band constricting a part of the carrier "above and relative to the bottom and holding portions of the side walls in firm engagement with bottles in the carrier.

4. A bottle carrier comprising an elongated rectangular sheet of flexible material scored and folded to provide a bottom and a pair of opposed vertical side walls, a handle constituting an integral part 0! the two side walls and disposed centrally above the bottom, and an endless band encircling the side walls and connecting the adjacent ends thereof, said band being disposed substantially parallel with the length of and above said bottom and of less length than the periphery of the latter whereby the band is supported against separation from the carrier by downward movement.

SIG-FRIED W. JOHNSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2417421 *Oct 11, 1940Mar 18, 1947Koolnis Stanley RPortable carrier
US2419842 *Mar 5, 1945Apr 29, 1947Morris Paper MillsHandle accessory for containers
US2430302 *Oct 4, 1944Nov 4, 1947Gardner Richardson CoCarrier for bottles and other articles
US2481871 *Apr 26, 1944Sep 13, 1949Potts Roy CHandhold and card pocket
US2527478 *Mar 4, 1940Oct 24, 1950Gray Harry ZBottle carrier
US2532446 *Oct 2, 1947Dec 5, 1950Empire Box CorpBottle carrier
US2559948 *Aug 2, 1949Jul 10, 1951Dacam CorpCarton for cylindrical objects
US2560927 *Apr 16, 1947Jul 17, 1951Sutherland Paper CoHandled cup or like receptacle
US2704222 *Feb 5, 1951Mar 15, 1955Loroco Ind IncCarton carrier
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/766, 206/427, 206/503, 206/193, 206/167, 229/117.14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/52