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Publication numberUS1981909 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 27, 1934
Filing dateMar 17, 1933
Priority dateMar 17, 1933
Publication numberUS 1981909 A, US 1981909A, US-A-1981909, US1981909 A, US1981909A
InventorsDunn Ralph J, Mclean Harold D
Original AssigneeDu Pont
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Improved perforated corset material and method of making the same
US 1981909 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 27, 1934. J DUNN ET AL 1,981,909

IMPROVED PERFORATED CORSET MATERIAL AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed March 17, 1953 c/Qaipf D/u/n/w INVENTORS ATTORNEY.

Patented Nov. 27, 1934 PATENT OFFICE IMPROVED PERFORATIIID consE'r MATE- RIAL AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Ralph J. Dunn and Harold McLean, Fairfield, Conn, assignors to E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Del., a

Delaware Application March 17,

corporation of 1933, Serial No. 661,340

6 Claims. (Cl. 1542) This invention relates to rubberized fabrics and more particularly to two fabrics combined by means of a layer of rubber, used in the manufacture of garments.

The manufacture and use of rubberized fabrics consisting of two knitted fabrics of cotton, rayon, silk, etc., or combinations thereof combined with a layer of rubber are well known to the art. The objection to this type of material has been that it is too dense, does not allow air to penetrate and thus does not afford ventilation and evaporation of perspiration.

Certain types of ventilated rubberized fabric corset materials have been developed in an 'attempt to overcome the objections above given. One of these is a stockinette calendered on one side with rubberized composition, cured and then perforated. The essentials of the manufacture of this type of material have been long known to the art. Another typeconsists of .two knitted fabrics combined with sponge rubber and perforated, Still another type consists of theabove knitted fabrics combined with a layer of rubber and then perforated. All of these are subject to greater or less disadvantage. For example, in the last type it is found that the knitted f brics unravel or run at the perforation and he sensation of unevenness of the material due to the perforations is quite noticeable and uncom fortable. In addition, this unraveling causes a noticeable unevenness of the material which in many cases is highly undesirable. A

The object of this invention is the production of improved ventilated type of rubberized fabric garment material. A further object is to produce an improved ventilated type of rubberized corset material affording greater comfort to the I wearer and better appearance. Further objects will appear hereinafter.

The objects of. this invention are accomplished by combining a knitted fabric, preferably -a knitted cotton fabric which has been napped and felted and another knitted fabric, preferably of silk or rayon. by means of a, layer of rubber,

perforating the combined material, compressing it to embed the loose ends of fibers of the ,pe-

riphery of the perforations in the rubber, and vulcanizing. L

The fabric which is worn next to the body may be of rayon, silk or the like but preferably consists of a cotton knitted material of the stockinette type of construction, which, when put through a napping machine, is capable of being napped on one side. This nap is of the felted type which presents a "cushiony and more atthis may present a more pleasing appearance. I

Both the back and face fabrics are coated with a thin layer of rubber on a calender in the usual manner, the back fabric being coated on the unnapped or smooth side and combined in the usual manner. This method is preferred to the method wherein a sheet of uncured rubber is combined by means of pressure etc., with two sheets of knitted fabric. After combining, the material is perforated in a perforating machine, the holes being about 1/32nd of an inch in diameter and so arranged and spaced as to present a uniform and attractive appearance. The term perforated is intended to refer to cutting, punching, or any other device whereby the fibers of the fabric arenormally severed or broken, and is not intended to refer to piercing the material with needles so'that the fibers are thrust apart and no out or severed ends are produced. After this operation the material is passed through a set of squeeze rolls to more, thoroughly embed the fabricsand particularly the loose ends of fibers at the peripheries of the perforations, into the rubber. Following this operation the combined fabric is cured or vulcanized.

Example I A napped and felted pink stockinette weighing 2.60 yards-40" wide-to the pound is calender coated on the smooth or unnapped side with the following rubber compound to about .020 inch in thickness:

Pale crepe '73 lbs. Red pigment 7 ozs. Zinc oxide 15 lbs. Lithopone -3 lbs.

Tuads t 3 ozs. Sulfur 2 lbs. 4 ozs Albasan 8 ozs in a row across the width of the material, each row being spaced A from the other. Alternate rows are staggered such that the holes are in a line half way between the holes in the row ahead and behind.

The perforated combined fabrics are again passed through the squeeze rolls or combiner so that the cut ends of the yarns around each hole 1 are more thoroughly embedded in the uncured rubber. The material is then festooned in a dry heat curing chamber and vulcanized for 2 hours at 250 F. After being cured it is trimmed and ready for manufacture into corsets, girdles, brassieres, stockings, instep supports, ankle braces, etc.

Whereas the above is an exact description of a preferred method of this invention, it is obvious that any modifications may be made without departing from the spirit thereof. For example, the fabrics may be of any weight and color. The backing fabric may be napped in various weights from a light scratch nap to a heavy felt nap. In certain cases the fabric need not be napped although a napped fabric is greatly preferred because of the cushioning effect thereof. The rubber composition may be of any type generally used for combined fabrics and the thickness of coatings may be varied from .010 to .080" without affecting the utility of the material; The perforating may be so arranged as to form various designs and the size of the holes may range from a mere piercing with a needle to inch in di ameter or there may be a combination of different sized holes. The compressing of the material is preferably done by means of squeeze rolls but may be done by other equivalent methods. The time and temperature of vulcanization may vary depending on the composition of the rubber coating.

The rubberized fabrics of the present invention maybe used for corsets, girdles, reducing garments, instep braces, ankle braces, brassieres, hygienic stockings, and the like.

The fabrics of the present invention have certain advantages over materials previously employed in that when the material is stretched the adhesion of the fabric being so much improved, the yarns show a greatly reduced tendency to pull loose around the perforations thus affording a smoother and more comfortable garment to the wearer and one more attractive exteriorly. The greater adherence of the fibers around the perforation also results in a. more extended period of utility and a corresponding economy Perforations made after vulcanization leave the cut ends of the yarns free which is the cause of runs or unravelling upon stretching of the material.

A further advantage of the preferred form of the invention is that the felted nap on the body side of the material acts as a comfortable cushion against the skin. This materially minimizes or eliminates the uncomfortable feeling due to roughness, should any of the yams become loosened from the rubber after a period of use and start to unravel or run around the perforation. This even further materially increases the useful life of the garment. The felted nap being of an absorbent nature also tends to absorb perspiration and gives air a greater chance to circulate next to the body thus increasing the rate of evaporation.

As many apparent and widely difierent embodiments of this invention may be made without departing from the spirit thereof, it is to be understood that we do not limit ourselves to the foregoing examples or description except as indicated in the following claims.

We claim:

l. A process of preparing elastic rubber garment material comprising cutting a plurality of holes in a material comprising two layers of knitted fabrics joined by a layer of a rubber composition, compressing said material to embed the cut ends of the fibers adjacent the peripheries of said holes in the rubber and vulcanizing said material.

2. A process of preparing elastic rubber garment material comprising cutting a plurality of holes in a material comprising a napped knitted fabric joined on its smooth side to a smooth knitted fabric by means of a rubber composition, compressing said material to embed the silk and rayon by means of a rubber composition,

compressing said material to embed the cut ends of the fibers adjacent the peripheries of said holes in the rubber and vulcanizing.

4. An elastic rubber garment material comprising a plurality of layers of knitted material joined by a layer of rubber composition, said garment material being perforated with a plurality of holes, the cut fibers adjacent the peripheries thereof being compressed into the rubber before vulcanizing.

5. An elastic rubber garment material comprising a napped knitted fabric joined on its smooth side to a smooth knitted fabric by means of a rubber composition, said garment material being perforated with a plurality of holes, the cut fibers adjacent the peripheries thereof being compressed into the rubber before vulcanization.

6. An elastic rubber garment material comprising a layer of napped knitted cotton fabric joined by means of a layer of rubber composition to a knitted material of the class consisting of silk and rayon, said garment material being perforated with a plurality of holes, the cut fibers adjacent the peripheries thereof being compressed into the rubber before vulcanizing.

RALPH J. DUNN. HAROLD D. McLEAN.

Referenced by
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US2488317 *Apr 26, 1944Nov 15, 1949Murray Albert LMethod of fabricating swatter heads
US2568429 *Oct 19, 1945Sep 18, 1951Fog Nozzle CompanyDistributor head
US2697664 *Sep 20, 1950Dec 21, 1954Swift & CoMethod of treating animal carcasses
US8002934 *Aug 25, 2009Aug 23, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpTrocar seal system
US8192405Aug 25, 2009Jun 5, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpTrocar seal system
US8267898Oct 5, 2010Sep 18, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpTrocar seal system
US8702657Feb 23, 2012Apr 22, 2014Covidien LpTrocar seal system
US20070144660 *Dec 17, 2004Jun 28, 2007O'sickey Matthew JBreathable elastic laminates and methods of manufacturing same
US20090314422 *Aug 25, 2009Dec 24, 2009Tyco Healthcare Group LpTrocar seal system
US20100107312 *Oct 28, 2009May 6, 2010Janice JaraicieUndergarments with transparent paneling
US20110021878 *Oct 5, 2010Jan 27, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpTrocar seal system
WO2005060674A2 *Dec 17, 2004Jul 7, 2005Tredegar Film Products CorporationBreathable laminate and method to manufacture
WO2005060674A3 *Dec 17, 2004Nov 23, 2006Tredegar Film Prod CorpBreathable laminate and method to manufacture
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/91, 428/137, 156/253
International ClassificationB32B38/04
Cooperative ClassificationB32B38/04
European ClassificationB32B38/04