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Publication numberUS1981938 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 27, 1934
Filing dateMay 7, 1934
Priority dateMay 7, 1934
Publication numberUS 1981938 A, US 1981938A, US-A-1981938, US1981938 A, US1981938A
InventorsAnderson Charles H
Original AssigneeAnderson Charles H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Scaffold joint
US 1981938 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 27, 1934. ANDERSON i 1,981,938

SCAFFOLD JOINT Filed May '7, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 6b 6.a I 4f- 4g, 4

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CHARLES HAA/oEEsO/y y' ATTORNEY Nov. 27, 1934. C, ANDERSON 1,981,938

SCAFFOLD JOINT Filed Mayfm. 1934 2 sheets-sheet 2 5y www,

rme/vfv Patented Nov. 27, 1934 UNITED STATESy .PA'IEN'Iy OFFICE 10 Claims.

This invention relates to adjustable scaffolds and has particular reference to means for joining together and bracing sections of such scaffold.

The general object of my invention is to provide an improved scaffold of simplicity, ease of operation and economical to manufacture and install.

To this end, the invention consists in the combinations and advantageous features hereinafter fully described and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, of which:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary elevation, partly in section, of a scaffold joint embodying the invention,

Fig. 2 is a substantially corresponding View showing the members of the joint partly separated,

Fig. 3 is a similar view, of a slightly modified structure, and Figs. 4 to 8 illustrate further modifications the importance of which will presently be described.

The structure of my invention comprises vertical tube sections 1 and 2, seated in a sleeve 3. On the section 1 is securely fastened a bracket 4, which comes to rest on the sleeve when the section is pushed into the sleeve. The lower section 2 may, at the bottom, carry a similar bracket 4 for seating in an additional sleeve 3, and it is made with a xed collar 5 on which the sleeve, and in turn the upper section, is supported. The top of the upper section 1 may be similarly fitted to carry the scaffold upward. By adding section upon section, in this manner, it is possible to raise the scaffold of my invention to reach the various stories of the building which it is designed to serve.

The bracket 4 is shown made with laterally projecting head 4a, and this head is perforated to form a sleeve which may be substantially like the sleeve 3 and may function in the same manner to support horizontal sections, Or the sleeve may be positioned diagonally, as indicated at 6a in Fig. 2, to support tubular braces (not shown).

The bracket 4 is also shown provided at one side, adjacent the sleeve 4a, with a pendent apron 4b, and this apron is spaced away from the tube section 1 far enough to slide down along the outer surface of the sleeve 3, when the parts are as- 50 sembled.

A perforation '7 extends transversely through the section l and the apron 4b, and this perforation is positioned to register with a perforation 3il of the sleeve when the parts ar\assembled,

55 whereupon a key 9 is inserted through these alined perforations. This key is made with a laterally projecting cam 9n which, when the key is inserted, is free to pass through notches 3b and 7a of the sleeve and tube section respectively. It is noticed that this cam lodges within the tube section when the key is fully inserted, whereupon the key is given a one-half turn to bring the cam out of registration with these key hole notches. The key is shown made with a handle 9b extending laterally in the direction of the cam. Because the key notches are at the top of the key hole, this key must be inserted with the cam and handle upwardly directed, as indicated in dotted outline. And when subsequently the key is turned downward, it is seen that the weight of the pendant handle \9b maintains the keyin this position and the parts rigidly locked together. The upper end of the sleeve is shown made with a lug 3c, which is shaped to engage a notch 4's in the bracket 4, thereby to maintain the tube section unturned in the sleeve while the two remain assembled.

A second key perforation is shown provided at the lower end of the sleeve for registration with a key perforation 2a at the top of the section 2. 80 And a key 10, substantially like the key 9, is similarly insertable at this point firmly to lock these parts together.

The diagonal sleeve 6a is shown made with similar key perforations 6b, and such key holes 85 are also provided in the sleeve 4a, all to serve the same function.

When tubular sections of desired lengths are provided, it is seen that scaifolds of any required proportions may be assembled and rigidly locked together, complete with the angular braces necessary to provide a strong and rigid structure.

The keys 9 and 10 are simple to manufacture and securely held in place by the weight of their own handles. When the scaffold is fully erected, the pressure on these keys is so heavy that considerable force is necessary to turn the keys, making their use entirely safe. Should it, however, be objected, that a key accidentally or maliciously might be turned and withdrawn, it is possible to provide other locking means, such as shown in Fig. 4.

In this case, a bolt 11 is employed, and this bolt is made with a reduced portion, or pilot 11a, seated in the wall of the sleeve 14, and in the apron of the bracket 13.. The body portion of the bolt is, directly behind this pilot, made with screw threads engaging a threaded perforation in one side of the tubular section 12. The end of the bolt is shown squared to receive a wrench.

followed, in erecting scaiolds of this type, is to start at, the bottom and to assemble section upon lsection as required to build or repair each succeeding story of a building. When the work on one floor is completed, the next higher scaifold section is assembled to reach above this story, and the loosely laid plank iiooring of the scaffold is picked up to form the scaffold floor at the next higher story, all as very familiar to those versed in the art.

It is customary, at least in larger building projects, to provide an elevator for raising material to each new story to be added, and the device of my invention lends itself admirably to the embodiment of such elevator, as will now be described and as illustrated in Figs. 6 to 8.

The vertical tube sections 1 and 2 may remain as described, and no change in sleeve 3 is necessary. I'lie bracket 4 alone is modied, as indicated at 20, by adding a lug 20, in which are seated axially alined pilots 201),.200, supporting elevator guide sections 21 and 22 in parallel relation to the vertical scaffold sections 1 and 2. The laterally projecting head 20d may remain exactly like the heads 4=L or 6a. In other words, the only modification of the device is the addition of the lug 20a for supporting the elevator guides 21 and 22.

In Fig. '7, two of these guides are shown provided. The elevator cage, or platform 23 is shown made with Wheels 24, riding on the guides to reduce friction, and these Wheels are mounted at the elevator corners in any suitable manner, as by brackets 25, secured to the elevator frame 26. The exact shape of the bracket lug 20*l is immaterial, it being only important that the peripheral outline of this lug lies in continuation of the guide sections, in order that there may be no break or interruption in the smooth guiding surface. The construction shown has the advantage that the guide sections merely need to be dropped in position on the pilots, to become securely locked in place.

From this it is seen, that an elevator may be supported and guided at any place along the scaifold of my invention merely by adding a lug, or its mechanical equivalent, to one of the members combining to form the structure of my invention. While this lug is shown added to thebracket 4, it may be incorporated in the sleeve 3 or in the collar 5, if preferred.

I claim:

1. In a scaffold, a sleeve made with key holes,

` tubular sections insertable in said sleeve and having key holes for registration with the key holes of the sleeve, and keys insertable through said key holes in one position and rotatable to a position of locking the sections in the sleeve and the keys against withdrawal. y

2. In a scaffold, a sleeve made with key holes, tubular sections insertable in said sleeve and having key holes for registration with the key holes of the sleeve, members on said sections engaging the ends of the sleeve to arrest the movement of the sections into the sleeve, and keys insertable through said key holes in one position and rotatable to a position of locking the sections in the sleeve and the keys against withdrawal.

3. In a scaffold, a sleeve made with key holes, tubular sections insertable in said sleeve and having key holes for registration with the key holes of the sleeve, said sleeve and lsections having interengaging portions preventing relative rotation of the parts, and keys insertable through said key holes in ofne position and rotatable to a position of locking the sections in the sleeve and the keys against withdrawal.

A4. In a joint, a transversely perforated sleeve, a tubular section insertable in the top of said sleeve and Ahaving a transverse perforation, a member on said section for arresting its insertion, said member having a transversely perforated apron spaced to slide along the outer surface of the sleeve, and a member seatable in said perforations to lock the parts rigidly together.

5. A sleeve transversely perforated near each end, tubular sections insertable in the sleeve from the ends and each made with transverse perforations for registration with the sleeve perforations, one section having a fixed bracket terminating in a similar sleeve angular-ly positioned relative to the first sleeve and provided with a perforated apron fitting the outer surface of the first sleeve, and means engaging :the perf'rations of the first 105 sleeve the sections and the said apron for locking said parts together.

6. In a scaiiold, a tubular member, a tubular section slidable into said member, a tube carrying ybracket rigidly mounted on said section for limiting its insertion into said member and made with an apron fitting the outer surface of the member, the member, section and apron having transverse perforations for registration when the parts are assembled, and means engaging the perforations to lock all said parts rigidly together.

7. In a scaffold, a tubular member, a tubular section slidable into said member, a tube carrying bracket rigidly mounted on said section and made with an apron fitting the outer surface of the member, the member section and apron hav-v ing transverse perf-orations for registration when lthe parts are assembled, and means engaging said perforations to lock all said parts rigidly together, the tube' of said bracket being shaped and fitted like the said tubular member to suplport other similar sections.

8. In a scaifold, a sleeve made with a key hole at each end, a tubular section insert-able in said sleeve and having a key hole for registration with one of the sleeve key holes, a member on said section for limiting the insertion of the section to bring said key holes in line, said member provided on one side with a similar sleeve angularly positioned relative to the tube sections and -having a lateral projection shaped to support elevator guides in parallel relation to said sections, and means insertable in said alined key holes to lock the sections in position in the sleeve.

9. In a scaffold, a sleeve made with transverse perforations at each end, tubular sections insertable in said sleeve and each having a perforation for registration with the sleeve perforations, a member on each section limiting the insertion of the section to aline said perforations and shaped to prevent rotation of the sections in the sleeve to disturb such alinement, said member having a lateral projection shaped to support elevator guides in axial alinement parallel with 150 verse perforation at eah end, tublar sections seatable in said sleeves and having at eseh end a. transverse perforation for registration with the sleeve perforations and a member at eaeh end fork limiting the .seating of the sections to bring said perforations in line, the member at one end of each section having on one side a lateral prol:lection fitted rto support elevator guides in axial alinement and in parallel relation to said tubular sections, and means seatable in the alined perforations for locking the sections in the sleeve.

\ CHARLES H. ANDERSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2446372 *Sep 18, 1945Aug 3, 1948Scaffolding Great Britain LtdMetal tubular scaffolding
US2754156 *Jul 27, 1953Jul 10, 1956 elderkin
US2765087 *May 27, 1954Oct 2, 1956Weinbaum Dave LPallet racks, staging, shelving and skid racks
US3034225 *Nov 5, 1958May 15, 1962Johnson CorpSyphon pipe structure
US3166199 *Feb 18, 1963Jan 19, 1965Hawkins Alta FAttachment for tractors
US3178150 *Jul 22, 1963Apr 13, 1965Johnson Stanley LBottom outlet valve for a mixing vessel
US3951236 *Dec 20, 1974Apr 20, 1976Schreiber Raymond HMountable hoist
US6199917Mar 30, 1999Mar 13, 2001Holdren Brothers, Inc.Twist pin
US6374565 *Nov 9, 1999Apr 23, 2002Foster-Miller, Inc.Foldable member
US6560942Oct 30, 2001May 13, 2003Foster-Miller, Inc.Open lattice, foldable, self deployable structure
US6910304Sep 3, 2002Jun 28, 2005Foster-Miller, Inc.Stiffener reinforced foldable member
US8074324Dec 13, 2011Foster-Miller, Inc.Flexible, deployment rate damped hinge
US20030182879 *Sep 3, 2002Oct 2, 2003Warren Peter A.Stiffener reinforced foldable member
Classifications
U.S. Classification285/27, 285/119, 285/305, 403/169, 285/417, 187/406, 403/49, 285/404, 285/188
International ClassificationE04G7/02, E04G7/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04G7/02
European ClassificationE04G7/02