Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1983756 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 11, 1934
Filing dateMay 9, 1934
Priority dateMay 13, 1933
Publication numberUS 1983756 A, US 1983756A, US-A-1983756, US1983756 A, US1983756A
InventorsAugust Hessmert
Original AssigneeAugust Hessmert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Handle grip
US 1983756 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 11, 1934. A 'HESSMERT 1,983,756

' HANDLE GRIP Filed May 9, 1934 ji wfn ra/i Patented Dec. 11, 1934 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFicE Application May 9, 1934, Serial No. 724,750 In Germany May 13, 1933 2 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in handle-grips more particularly intended for the handle-bars of cycles and the like.

The attachment of handle-grips to handle-bars 5 of cycles has usually been accomplished by making the grip of celluloid which becomes soft and extensible when placed in hot water. Inside the grip there is a cardboard sleeve which is glued to the grip. The sleeve and the grip in its softened state are pushed on to the handle-bar tube. On drying, the grip contracts and clamps itself onto the handle-bar, thus compensating for any Slight differences in the diameters of different handlebar tubes. Such grips however are often hard to put on due to the paste board sleeve crumpling up when the grip is put into water for softening the glue and the celluloid. Furthermore these grips are expensive in manufacturing and uncertain in solidity.

It has also been proposed to clamp the grips to the handle bars by a projection entering the mouth of the handle-bar. For this purpose it often was necessary to use special parts and intermediate members to secure the desired frictional engagement and there was always the danger of bursting the grips especially if they were composed of rigid material such as bakelite or other pressed substances.

The present invention has as its object the provision of a grip especially for the handle-bars of cycles which is simple and cheap in manufacturing, adapted to be attached without any intermediate means and difficulties and which will securely remain in its place when put to its support.

To this end the invention contemplates a grip having an internally provided projection of polygonal, staror cross-like cross-section forming part of the grip body and entering the mouth of the handle-bar tube only by strong pressure, a grip sleeve the inner diameter of which is slightly greater than the outer diameter of the handlebar tube, and internally leading ribs ending short of the mouth of the sleeve so as to ensure its easy slipping to the end of the support and equalizing the small diiferences in the diameter of the handle bars in being scraped to the necessary amount. These ribs are arranged offset to the arms of the said projection to enable the deformation of the handle-bar between them by the projection entering it without bursting the sleeve of the grip. A sealing ring may be arranged at the mouth of the grip to protect the mouth, to centre and guide the grip and to tighten the interior of the grip to the handle bar.

The invention is fully disclosed in the following specification, of which the accompanying drawing forms a part, in which Fig. 1 is a view partly in section of the improved handle grip, 5

Fig. 2 is a transverse section thereof on the line II-II of Fig. 1.

In the drawing, the grip which is more particularly intended for the handle-bar of cycles is composed of one piece of a pressed substance such as bakelite or the like. The bottom 1 of the grip is provided with an internal projection 2 of cross-like section, which slightly tapers to its head. This tapering projection is forced into the handle-bar tube only by strong pressure. The inner diameter of the sleeve 4 of the grip is slightly greater than the outer diameter of the tube to which it shall be attached so as to engage the tube with certain free play.

Offset to the arms of the cross-like projection, which however may also be star-like or otherwise polygonal in cross-section, there are provided in the sleeve 4 of the grip the small arcuate longitudinal ribs 3 extending from the bottom to short of the mouth of the sleeve. These ribs are provided for exactly guiding the grip in being put to its support and to equalize any differences in the diameter especially of the handle-bar tubes.

The mouth of the sleeve is protected by a metal ring 5 the inner diameter of which is smaller than the outer diameter of the handle-bar tube. This ring also will act as a guide in putting the grip to bar tube. Furthermore it will tighten the interior of the grip fixed to the handle-bar tube.

In pushing the grip to the handle-bar the end of the handle-bar tube will first strike to the inner edge of the ring and expand it to the outer diameter of the tube. Then the tube comes in contact with the small ribs 3, the arcuate edges 40 of which are scraped by the sharp mouth of the tube onto the diameter of the tube thus exactly (guiding the tube to the projection 3. In further pushing the grip the handle-bar gets into the distance between the inner wall of the sleeve i and the projection. If now the grip e. g. by some strikes of a hammer is driven fully to the handlebar tube, the projection will enter the tube and deform its mouth to an irregular cross-section. This deformation of the handle-bar tube however does not impose any pressure or strain to the sleeve l as by the ribs, between which the expansion of the handle-bar tube takes place, sufiicient distance is provided between the tube and the sleeve to take up the deformation.

By its deformation the handle-bar tube is firmly secured to the grip, which never can be loosened *by atmospheric influences as by moisture or heat. Furthermore the deformation of the handle-bar tube will prevent any rotation of the p- What I claim is:

1. In a handle-grip more particularly intended for the handle-bars of cycles and the like, an internally provided projection of polygonal cross-section forming part of the grip body and entering the'mouth of the handle-bar tube only by strong pressure, a grip-sleeve the inner diameter of which is greater than the outer diameter of the handle-bar tube and parallel leading; ribs offset to the arms of said internally provided projection and ending short of the mouth of the grip.

2. In a handle-grip more particularly intended for the handle-bars of cycles and the like, an internally 1 provided projection of polygonal cross-section forming part of the grip body and entering the mouth of the handle-bar tube only by strong pressure a grip-sleeve the inner diameter of which is greater than the outer diameter of the handle-bar tube, parallel leading ribs offset to the arms of said internally provided projection and ending short of the mouth of the grip, and a metal sealing ring to protect the mouth of the grip and tighten the interior of the grip fixed to the handle bar.

AUGUST HESSMERT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3995856 *Jun 3, 1975Dec 7, 1976Eaton CorporationTennis racket grip
US4000895 *Aug 18, 1975Jan 4, 1977Reynolds Metals CompanyBall bat
US4677872 *Jul 31, 1985Jul 7, 1987Kawasaki Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaMethod of fitting grip over handlebar and grip used in carrying the method into practice
US8628436 *Jan 14, 2011Jan 14, 2014Ryan PowellLacrosse stick accessory
US20110303056 *Dec 15, 2011Ryan PowellLacrosse Stick Accessory
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/551.9, 249/66.1, 473/298
International ClassificationB62K21/00, B62K21/26
Cooperative ClassificationB62K21/26
European ClassificationB62K21/26