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Publication numberUS1983810 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 11, 1934
Filing dateMay 12, 1933
Priority dateMay 12, 1933
Publication numberUS 1983810 A, US 1983810A, US-A-1983810, US1983810 A, US1983810A
InventorsRice Joel A
Original AssigneeRice Joel A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable hook-lacing clasp for corsets and the like
US 1983810 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

8c, 11, 1934. J A Rm 1,983,810

ADJUSTABLE HOOK LACING CLASP FOR CORSETS AND THE LIKE Original Filed May 12, 1933 4 Sheets-Sheet l WWW/Mm Dec, 11, 1934. 1 A 1,983,810

ADJUSTABLE HOOK LACING CLASP FOR CORSETS AND,THE LIKE Original Filed May 12, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 wmm U L/iaez mzz'ee J. A. RlCE Dec. 11, 1934.

ADJUSTABLE HOOK LACING' CLASP FOR CORSETS AND THE LIKE Original Filed May 12, 1933 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Han mmhm aibeZ a. 3609 Dec. 11, 1934. A, c 1,983,810

ADJUSTABLE HOOK LACING CLASP FOR GORSETS AND THE LIKE Original Filed May 12, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet Patented Dee. 11, 1934 1383,8110

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 11,933,310 7 f, ADJUSTABLE HOOK-LACING CLASP FOR ooRsE'rs ND THE LIKE" Y Joe A. Rice, New York, N. Y,

Application May 12, 1933',"Serial No. 670,773

" Renewed May- 8, 1934 The inventionrelates to lacing adjustable fas- With the foregoing and minor objects in view, teners for corsets, corselettes, abdominal, belts the invention resides in the novel subject matand the like, and is of the hook-lacing clasp type, ter hereinafter described and claimed, descripin which the fronts of the corset or the likeare tion being accomplished by reference to the ac- ,5 provided with hooks engaged by lacing. The compan ying drawings.

invention further relates to fasteners of this Fig. 1' is a perspective view showing the intype in which the lace-engaging hooks are carventionapplied to the ends of an inner abdominal ried by clasps held in hems, folds, etc., at the support of a c'orselette. A front of the corset or the like, and it is my prin- Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary front elecipal object to provide an adjustable fastener vation partly broken away and in section. 10 of this general form possessing unusual dura- Fig. 3 is a horizontal sectional view on line bility, flexibility and comfort, and one which may 3-3 of Fig. 2. be expeditiously and inexpensively manufac- Fig. 4 is a front elevation showing one of the tured. improved clasps illustrated in Figs. 1 to 3. To attain flexibility, each clasp is formed from Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary perspecl5 inner and outer flat strips of resilient metal havtive view thereof. ing their ends slidably engaged to permit them Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the inner and to relatively slide during fiexure of the clasp. outer strips of the clasp showing the hooks of The lace-engaging hooks are carried by the inner the inner strip stamped out but not completely strip and pass through slots in the outer strip, bent into shape, preparatory to insertion through the slots being sufilciently long to prevent their the slots of the outer strip. ends from abutting the hooks and interfering Fig. 7 is a detail vertical sectional view as with the aforesaid relative sliding of the strips. indicated by line 7-7 of Fig. 5, showing the Passage of the hooks of the inner strip through manner in which the shank of the hook is reslots in the outer strip, not only holds the two 'lated with its receiving slot and illustrating one 25 strips against relative canting, but provides for way in which the hook may be shaped to preeffective bracing of the hooks against pull of vent chafing of the lacing; the lace or laces, for edge walls of said slots may Fig, 8 is .a front elevation showing a clasp be disposed in contact with the hooks-to acoomwith parallel edges instead of converging, as plish this result. I in previous views. 30 Forming of the clasp from inner and outer Fig. 9 is a View similar to Fig. 5 but showstrips, permits stamping of the hooks from said ing a somewhat different form of construction. inner strip, providing for more easy manufac- .Fig. 10 is a fragmenta y perspective view showture and producing a less bulky clasp than when ing portions of the inner and outer strips illusthe hooks are riveted or bradded in place, yet trated in Fig. 9, the hooks of the inner strip 5 such stamping will not seriously weaken the being stamped out but not bent into complete clasp, for any weakening of the inner strip shape.

is more than counteracted by the outer strip, Fig. 11 is a detail vertical sectional view on and the hook-receiving slots of the latter do not line 11-11 of Fig. 9. p weaken it to any appreciable extent. Fig. 12 is a view similar to Fig. 1, but illustrat- 40 A further object is to provide a novel and i ing the invention applied to fasten the outer advantageous structure in which the two metal fronts of a corselette. strips are held in contact with each other by Fig. 13 is afragmentary perspective view showparts of the hooks. ing yet another form of construction.

Yet another aim is the provision of unique Fig. 14 is a fragmentary perspective view of 45 hooks having portions which not only hold the the strips shownin Fig. 13, in juxtaposition, the strips together, but assist informing lace-enhooks being stamped fromthe inner strip but gaging faces of such form as to have no tendency not bent to complete shape. I to chafe the lacing. Fig. 15 is a detail vertical sectional view on Corsets and the like provided with-hookline l5-l5.,of Fig. 13.

carrying clasps are subjected to a great deal of Figs. 16, 1'7 and 18 are views similar to Figs.

wear and strain at the ends of said clasps, and. 13, 14 and 15, showing a form of construction a further aim of the present invention is to make in which the hooks are provided with wings tonovel provision at said ends of the clasp for reprevent them from chafing the lacing, Fig. 18 v sisting the wear and strain. 1 being cut on line 18.-18 of Fig. 16.

Fig. 19 is a front elevation showing another form of construction in which the hooks are provided with wings to prevent chafing of the lacing.

Fig. 20 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view of the form shown in Fig. 19.

Fig. 21 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the two strips of Fig. 20 in juxtaposition, the hooks being bent from the inner strip but not bent into complete shape.

Fig. 22 is a horizontal sectional view on line 22-22 of Fig. 20.

Fig. 23 is a detail vertical sectional View on line 23-23 of Fig. 22.

Several forms of construction have been shown and will be rather specifically, described, with the understanding however, that numerous variations may be made within the scope of the invention as claimed. Proportions and materials may be selected to best suit requirements, and the invention may be used in connection with any kind of a corset or the like, to which it is adaptable, and may constitute either an outside-lacing clasp, or an inside-lacing clasp. Then too, while the clasps may taper toward their upper ends, they might well be of the shape shown in Figs. 8 and 19, or similar thereto. Moreover, While these clasps are designed primarily to extend only a short distance, if at all, above the waist line, they might well be of other lengths.

Each clasp is composed of a fiat inner spring metal strip 11 and a fiat outer spring metal strip 12, both strips being preferably of the same shape and size. These strips in some forms of the invention are secured together at their central portions by rivets or the like 13 but their ends are left slidably engaged so that the end portions of the strips may relatively slide during flexure of the clasp. Were the ends held against sliding, the clasp would possess such rigidity that it would be useless to a large extent on account of undue rigidity, and one strip or the other would necessarily buckle during flexure. In Figs. 1 to 8, lace-engaging hooks 14 are stamped from the inner strip 11, from portions of said strip betweenits longitudinal edges. The shanks 15 of these hooks pass through small slots 16 in the outer strip 12, said slots being of sufiicient length so that their ends cannot abut said shanks and interfere with relative sliding of the end portions of the two strips, during flexure of the clasp. The shanks 15 are clinched at 18 upon the strip 12 and may be stamped into the shape shown more particularly at 18' in Figs. and 7 so that they cannot chafe the lacing 17. Preferably, both sides of each hook shank 15 contact with the longitudinal edge walls of the shank-receiving slots 16. By so doing, the strips 11 and 12 are held against any canting with respect to each other, even if there should only be one rivet or the like 13 connecting the intermediate portions of said strips. Then too, by having the sides of the hook shanks in contact with edges of the slots 16, said edges effectively brace said shanks against distortion under the pull of the lacing. The inner strip 11 is, of course, weakened to some extent by stamping of the hooks 14 therefrom, but such weakening is more than counteracted by the outer strip 12 whose slots 16 do not weaken it to any appreciable extent.

The hooks 14 are first stamped out in the form of tongues as seen in Fig. 6. The two strips 11 and 12 are then assembled with these tongues passing through the slots '16, and the shaping of the hooks is completed after securing said strips together by means of the rivets or the like 13. If desired, principally for appearance, the ends of the hooks may be formed with small openings 19.

Two short wear and strain resisting strips 20 of flexible material, preferably tough fabric such as webbing or inner belting, are held between the ends of the strips 11 and 12 and project beyond said ends to provide flexible tabs. These strips 20 may be glued or cemented in place in any desired way.

In Figs. 9 to 11, the construction, with two exceptions, is the same as above described. One

diiference is that the hooks 14 are stamped from an edge portion of the strip 11. The other difference is in the connection of the strips 20 with the clasp. The end portions of the inner strip 11 are formed with openings 21 and the end portions of the strip 12 are provided with inwardly stamped lugs 22 opposite said openings. These lugs hold restricted portions 23 of the strips 20 in the openings 21, and said lugs and openings may therefore be used as the sole means for securing the strips 20 in place, although the strips could be cemented or glued also if desired. Preferably, the openings 21 are elongated to allow slight movement of the strip portions 23 therein,

when the ends of the strips 11 and 12 slide with respect to each other. will withstand the strain and wear which commonly takes place at the ends of hook clasps.

In the additional forms of the invention now to be described, strips such as 20 or 20 may be employed, although not illustrated. The same is true of the lace-engaging eyes 24 and/or hooks 24 In Figs. 13, 14 and 15, the

front or outer strip 12 is formed with slots 16 near one edge and said strip is rearwardly offset from each slot to said edge, to provide the front with shallow depressions 2'7. These depressions 27 may be formed in the strip 12 prior to clinching of the hooks 14 upon said strip as hereside of said strip inafter explained, or concurrently with such' clinching. The hooks 14 are stamped from an edge portion of the inner or rear strip 11 and after passage through the slots 16 the shank portions of said hooks are clinched as seen at 28 against the front side of the outer or front strip 12. The clinched portions 28 lie in the depressions 2'7, and the offset strip portions 29 which form said depressions, lie in the notches 30 of the strip 11, from which the hooks l l are stamped.

The construction just described (Figs. 13 to adequately secures the strips 11 and 12 together without the use of fasteners such as 13, but the depressions 27 and slots 16 at least toward the ends of said strips, are sufliciently long to prevent them from interfering with relative sliding of the strips during flexure.

In Figs. 16, 17 and 18, the construction is very similar to that shown in Figs. 13, 14 and 15.

The books 14 however, exclusive of their freeends, are made wider, and they are slit at 31, and bent to provide lace-engaging wings 32 at the edges of the lace-engaging bight portions 33. The formations 32 and 33 are jointly shaped to engage the lacing without any tendency to injure the same and they provide for unusually large areas of contact between lacing and hooks, insuring long life of said lacing.

The strip 12 of Figs. 16 to 18, includes depressions 27 adjacent theslots 16, parts 28 of The strips and '20 the hooks 14 are clinched into said depressions, and the off-set strip portions 29 which form the depressions, occupy the notches 30 from which the hooks 14 are stamped.

In Figs. 19 to 23, the hooks 14 are stamped from the strip 11 between the edges of the latter, and are provided with integral wings 32 at the edges of their lace-engaging bight portions 33, said bight portions and wings being shaped like the corresponding portions of Figs. 16 to 18, for the same purpose. The hooks 14 pass through slots 16 in the strip 12. The hooks effectively connect the two strips with each other.

Two of the clasps constructed in any of the ways above described, are held in hems, folds, or the like at the ends E of the corset or other parts to be connected, with the hooks projecting through openings and disposed along the extreme edges of said ends or parts so as to be accessible for engagement with the lacing 17 and to have no tendency to cant the clasps. If eyes 24 (Figs. 1 and 2) or additional hooks 24 (Fig. 12) be required below the clasps, the lower strips 20 or 20 assist in effectively anchoring them, and the attaching means of said eyes or additional hooks, may pass through these strips as well as through the corset material 25 and the interlining 26.

By providing the novel structure shown and described, or an equivalent thereof, an inner or outer hook-lacing clasp is provided having advantages from the standpoints of manufacture, comfort, durability, adjustability and convenience. While the details disclosed, may be considered as preferred, attention is again invited to the possibility of making numerous variations within the scope of the invention as claimed.

I claim:-

1. In a hook-lacing clasp for corsets and the like, a flat resilient metal outer strip having longitudinally spaced slots, a flat resilient metal inner strip lying permanently at the inner side of said outer strip, and lace-engaging hooks carried by said inner strip, said hooks having shank portions passing through said slots of said outer strip and having bills spaced outwardly from said outer strip, the ends of said strips being slidably engaged to allow relative sliding during flexure, the ends of said slots being spaced from said shank portions to permit such sliding without interference.

2. In a hook-lacing clasp for corsets and the like, a flat resilient metal outer strip having longitudinally spaced slots, a flat resilient metal inner strip lying permanently at the inner side of said outer strip, and lace-engaging hooks carried by said inner strip, said hooks having shank portions passing through said slots of said outer strip, and having bills spaced outwardly from said outer strip, said slots having edge walls abutting the outer sides of said shank portions to brace the latter against bending under the pull of the hook-engaging lace, the ends of said strips being slidably engaged to allow relative sliding during flexure, the ends of said slots being spaced from said shank portions to permit such sliding without interference.

3. A clasp for corsets and the like, comprising a flat resilient metal inner strip, a flat resilient metal outer strip lying permanently at the outer side of said inner strip, and fastening elements carried by one of said strips and projecting accessibly, the other strip having slots receiving portions of said fastening elements.

4. In a hook-lacing clasp for corsets and the like, a flat resilient metal outer strip having longitudinally spaced slots, a flat resilient metal inner strip lying permanently at the inner side of said outer strip, and lace-engaging hooks stamped from said inner strip, said hooks having shank portions passing through said slots of said outer strip, said slots having edge walls abutting the outer sides of said shank portions to brace the latter against bending under the pull of the hook-engaging lace, the ends of said strips being slidably engaged to allow relative sliding during flexure, the ends of said slots being spaced from said shank portions to permit such sliding without interference.

5. A clasp for corsets and the like, comprising a flat resilient metal outer strip having longitudinally spaced slots, a flat resilient metal inner strip lying permanently at the inner side of said outer strip, and fastening elements carried by,

said inner strip, said fastening elements passing through said slots, being clinched against the outer side of said outer strip, and projecting accessibly from said outer strip.

6. A structure as specified in claim 5; said fastening elements being stamped from said inner strip leaving openings in the latter, the parts of said outer strip against which said fastening elements are clinched, being offset into said openings.

7. A hook-lacing clasp comprising a flat resilient metal outer strip having longitudinally spaced slots, a flat resilient metal inner strip, and lace-engaging hooks carried by said inner strip, said hooks passing through said slots, being bent toward one edge of said outer strip and clinched against the outer side of the latter, and being then bent in the opposite direction.

8. A structure as specified in claim 7; said hooks being stamped from said inner strip leaving openings in the latter, the parts of said outer strip against which said hooks are clinched, being offset intosaid openings.

9. A hook-lacing clasp comprising a flat resilient metal outer strip having longitudinally spaced slots, a flat resilient metal inner strip, and lace-engaging hooks carried by said inner strip, said hooks passing through said slots and having integral oblique wings on the edges of their bight portions, said wings lying at the outer side of said outer strip, said wings and bight portions being jointly shaped to engage a lace without chafing the same.

10. In a device of the class described, having outer and inner resilient metal strips secured to each other between their ends; a short strip of flexible material between adjacent ends of said metal strips, said flexible strip projecting beyond the adjacent ends of the metal strips to provide a tab.

11. In a device of the class described, having outer and inner resilient metal strips secured to each other between their ends; a short strip of flexible material held between adjacent ends of said metal strips and projecting beyond said adjacent ends to provide a tab, one of said adjacent strip ends having an opening, the other of said adjacent strip ends having an inwardly projecting lug opposite said opening, a portion of said flexible strip being held within said opening by means of said lug.

JOEL A. RICE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5207703 *Nov 21, 1990May 4, 1993Jain Krishna MSuture organizer
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/713.9, 24/713.3
International ClassificationA41F1/00, A41F1/04
Cooperative ClassificationA41F1/04
European ClassificationA41F1/04