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Publication numberUS1983969 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 11, 1934
Filing dateJul 29, 1933
Priority dateJul 29, 1933
Publication numberUS 1983969 A, US 1983969A, US-A-1983969, US1983969 A, US1983969A
InventorsDavis Frederick W
Original AssigneeUmbiliklamp Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical clamp
US 1983969 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 11, 1934.

F. w, DAVIS SURGTCAII CLAMP Filed July 29, 1935 INVENTQR.

ATTORNEYS.

Patented Dec. 11, 1934 UNITED STATES SURGICALrGLAMP Frederick W. Davis, Dayton, Qhio, assignor to The Umbiliklamp Companyf Dayton, ,Qhio, .'a

corporation of Ohio Application July 29, 1933, SeriaDNo. 532,810

10 Claims.

This invention relates to surgical clamps and, in particular, to that type of surgical-clamp'used to clamp the umbilical cord of an infant at birth.

An object .of my invention is to provide a surgical clamp having adjustable parts and I holding jaws.

Another object is .to provide such a clamp which is particularly useful as an umbilical clamp having adjustable jaws adapting the clamp to diiierent sizesof cords.

.Another object is to provide such a clamp .of such construction as to be readily-attachable supporting function against the abdomen of the infant.

Another object is to provide such a clamp which requires but one hand of the operator for its manipulation.

Another object is to provide such a clamp which is free from springs and'fiexible loading devices, yet which has positive locking means incorporated therewith.

Another object is to provide such a clamp which is complete in itself and which requires no additional tools or accessories for its application.

Another object is to provide such a clamp which may be made of materials which are noncorrosive, of long life, non-yielding and free from the danger of harboringbacteria.

Another object is to provide such 'a clamp having jaws adapted to hold a bandageor pad for general surgical uses as well as for obstetrical purposes.

Figure .7 is .a similar plan view .of the .other and .:.cooperating .arm :of .the clamp.

Figure .8' -is a side elevation of the clamp portion shown=in Eigurexfi, viewedfrom the directionof :thelinezB-eS in Figurefi.

Figure .9 is .a @front view of .an approximately actual sizegshowing the clamp as appliedto an umbilical .cord;

L-Figure 10 is va .side elevation of the clamp shown in aFigureJQ, .but with the outer surfaces fiat insteadotconvexed.

Referring to -:-the drawing .in .detail, .Figure .1

shows the 'clampcof .;my inventionzin .-its open position. flheclamp .is;composed of a pair of arms 1 .and 22' respectively, .having :projecting ears .3 :and 4 adaptedz-to inter-engage oneanother through; the agency .of .a rivet 15 .in a hole i6, ,passing throughuboth ears. The outwardly facing end of each'hole 6 is .provided with a flared-portion '7 ;adapted .to receive the correspondinglyflared portion'of the rivet 5 and thus countersink .the .opposite headsof the latter so that no portion thereof projects to any great extentiaboveztheisurriounding portions of the ears i3 and.=4.

LFrom 'Figur.e-,.8, it willbe seen that the ear 3 of Jthecla'mparm .1 is arranged to one side of :the center plane of the clamp,.sothat thisplane substantially coincides .withzthedower surface 8 0f :the .ear13. z-Th'e 'ear.4 of ;-the clamparm 2is arranged .on -'.:the vopposite-side of the center plane :of the .:.clamp, .50 that its upper surface 19 xseenin :Figure S7 :likewise substantially coin- .cides .with this .plane.and. consequently engages theopposing face 8zofthe clamp arm 1 when the two arms are assembled.

The clamp arms .1 .and 2 areuapproximately crescent-shaped. The inner .mid-portions -10 and 11 :thereof are provided with corrugations 12 (Figures {5 Hand 18) .adapted to hold firmly :thearticle ormemberzwhich the arms 1 and 2 .clamp between themselves. In their preferable form, these-corrugations 12 consist ofa plurality.of projections -I 1 3 near each-edge and a depression'l4 running alongthe center lines. It will be. understood, however, that such corrugations may be varied in many :ways without departing from the spirit of my invention, since many formsof corrugation will provide the tenacious gripping. effect desired.

.The .ends 15 and 16 oftheclamparms 1 and 2 opposite the:-iearsz3 rand 4-thereof are likewise arranged .oneachrside of the central plane of the clamp so thatltheirinner surfaces 17 and 18. are substantially coincident with that-plane.

The inner surfaces 17' and 18 are provided with serrations 19 and 20 adapted to inter-engage with one another and hold the clamp arms in any desired position. In this way the size of the opening between the mid-portions 10 and 11 may be readily varied to suit the particular conditions encountered. Although the serrations 19 and 20 firmly hold the arms in their clamped positions (Figures 2, 4 and 9), they may be instantly disengaged and re-adjusted to a new position. These serrations 19 and 20 preferably comprise alternate ridges and grooves, these being most suitably directed toward the center axis of the rivet hole 6.

These ridges and grooves are preferably ar-v ranged to have a ratchet effect (Figure 4) so that they slide readily past one another in one direction, as in closing the arms 1 and 2, but interlock with one another firmly against motion in the opposite direction-that of opening the arms. The latter, however, may be readily opened by grasping the arms, one in each hand, forcing them away from one another, thus lifting the serrations out of engagement with one another. In this position, the arms 1 and 2 may be moved open. On releasing the arms, the natural spring of the clamp will cause the serrations to re-engage one another. To close the clamp, however, the latter may be held in the fingers of one hand and the two arms moved toward one another by the mere pressure of the fingers alone.

The outer surfaces 21 and 2-2 of the clamp are preferably slightly convex (Figure 5). It will be understood, however, that these surfaces may be made flat without exceeding the scope of my invention, as shown at 23 and 24 in Figure 10.

In its preferred form, the clamp is arranged with the ears on the opposite sides of the central plane from the arms (Figure 8), although these may be arranged on the same sides thereof without exceeding the scope of the invention.

In the use of my clamp for general medical and surgical purposes, a bandage, a pad, or supporting member may be clamped between the clamp arms 1 and 2 and locked firmly in place by the inter-engagement of the serrations thereon. A long portion of cloth such as gauze or flannel, for example, may be provided at one location with a pad of cotton, gauze or other suitable material. The gauze may be then drawn backward to enclose the pad, the neck portion behind the latter being then gripped by the clamp, thus engaging the pad within the cloth band. The ends of the band may then be tied around the portion of the body to which the pad is to be applied, and the clamp then serves not only to hold the pad but also to provide a supporting backing for the pad.

In its use for obstetrical purposes, my clamp is first carefully sterilized, preferably in boiling water. The clamp is constructed of materials which are not injured by high sterilization temperatures, and consequently may be absolutely freed from any living bacteria which might otherwise escape the action of a sterilizing agent which was not so heated. This possibility of sterilization by heat is an important feature of my invention and renders its use free from the dangers of infection, which have previously accompanied the use of such clamps.

In actual use the arms of the sterilized clamp are separated, as shown in Figure 1. As soon as the infant is born, the open clamp is slipped quickly around the umbilical cord 25 (Figure 9) at a point adjacent the infants abdomen. The arms are then forced tightly together so that the mid-portions 1G and 11 of the clamp tightly constrict the cord and the inter-engaging serrations 19 and 20 firmly lock the arms in place. The roughened compression surfaces 12 of the mid-portions 10 and 11 then firmly engage the cord 25, and constrict its two arteries 26 and 27 and its vein 28 so that no blood can escape therefrom. At the time of this operation or subsequently, a gauze pad may be placed between the clamp and the skin of the abdomen.

The umbilical cord may now be severed in the usual way, but one such severance being necessary, since the cord is not threaded through the clamp. In this way any hemorrhage is prevented, which might occur during such threading operations. It is preferable, however, to place a second clamp around the cord, spaced apart from the first clamp, and to make the severance between the two clamps. In this way hemorrhage from the cord is prevented in both directions, a matter which is important if the delivery includes twin births. The projecting stump of the cord and the clamp may then be covered with a surgical dressing to protect the same from infection and to assist the early healing thereof. The usual band is then placed around the infants abdomen.

With the use of my clamp in the above way, it is found that the stump of the cord separates in a very few days. Any tendency of the navel to bulge and any possibility of ahernia thereof is prevented by the supporting action of the clamp, an action which is further assisted by the convex surfaces of the clamp. After the clamp has been removed in the healing of the navel, the clamp may be sewn in the abdomen band and in this way still performs its supporting function. A similar supporting function may be performed by a pad clamped between the arms of my clamp in the manner previously described. In the above case, my clamp exerts a compressing or constricting action and simultaneously a supporting action without producing any pull between the stump and the abdomen. This pull has a tendency to produce the hernia above referred to.

In the use of my clamp, there are no springs to fail, nothing corrosive to injure the skin of the infant, and no external tools or accessories are required to engage or release it.

The clamp is of very simple construction and is easily made in large quantities at a low cost of production. The form of the clamp readily lends itself to production by die casting, thus further reducing the cost of manufacture.

It will be understood that the central opening between the arms of the clamp may be adjusted to any size encountered in practice. It is found that the sizes of cords vary between wide limits, the smallest being those of prematurely born infants. My clamp as readily adapts itself to successful use with small cords as with large ones, and its constricting and compressing function is not dependent upon the action of springs or resilient compressing materials, hence does not vary with the size of the cord being clamped. On the contrary, the constricting effect produced by my clamp may be controlled by the physician, the sensitiveness of whose fingers will readily obtain the desired compressing effect.

It Will be understood that I desire to comprehend within my invention such modifications as may be necessary to adapt it to varying conditions and uses.

Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A surgical clamp comprising a pair of semicircular, overlapping and interlocking arms pivotally engaging one another at one end thereof, said arms having inter-engaging serrated locking portions comprising multiple serrations on each arm at their opposite ends to lock said arms in position, said serrations being composed of alternate ridges and grooves, said semi-circular arms forming an area between them in which is located the material to be clamped, the outline of the area remaining the same but varying in size longitudinally and iaterally, said outline comprising a pair of intersecting arcs defining a space of varying width and length but having sides of constant curvature and the ends of the space terminating in sharp points.

2. A surgical clamp comprising a pair of arms pivotally engaging one another at one end thereof, said arms having inter-engaging serrated locking portions at their opposite ends, said serrations being composed of alternate ridges and grooves directed radially toward the axis of said pivotal connection.

3. A surgical clamp comprising a pair of semicircular, overlapping and interlockinlg arms pivotally engaging one another at one end thereof, said arms having inter-engaging locking portions comprising multiple serrations on each arm at their opposite ends to lock said arms in position and roughened compression surfaces along their mid-portions, said semi-circular arms forming an area between them in which is located the material to be clamped, the outline of the area remaining the same but varying in size longitudinally and laterally, said outline comprising a pair of intersecting arcs defining a space of varying width and length but having sides of constant curvature and the ends of the space terminating in sharp points.

4. A surgical clamp comprising a pair of arms pivotally engaging one another at one end thereof, said arms having inter-engaging locking portions at their opposite ends and roughened compression surfaces along their mid-portions, said roughened compression surfaces being arranged along arcuate facing edge portions of said clamp.

5. A surgical clamp comprising a pair of arms pivotally engaging one another at one end thereof, said arms having inter-engaging locking portions at their opposite ends and roughened compression surfaces along their mid-portions, said roughened compression surfaces being arranged along arcuate facing edge portions of said clamp and comprising alternate projections and depressions.

6. A surgical clamp comprising a pair of semicircular, overlapping and interlocking arms pivotally engaging one another at one end thereof, said arms having inter-engaging locking portions comprising multiple serrations on each arm at their opposite ends to lock said arms in position and roughened compression surfaces along their mid-portions, said roughened compression surfaces comprising alternate projections and depressions, said semi-circular arms forming an area between them in which is located the material to be clamped, the outline of the area remaining the same but varying in size longitudinally and laterally, said outline comprising a pair of intersecting arcs defining a space of varying width and length but having sides of constant curvature and the ends of the space terminating in sharp points.

7. A surgical clamp comprising a pair of semicircular, overlapping and interlocking arms pivotally engaging one another at one end thereof, said arms having inter-engaging locking portions comprising multiple serrations on each arm at their opposite ends to lock said arms in position and roughened compression surfaces along their mid-portions, said roughened compression surfaces comprising alternate projections and depressions arranged near the outer surfaces of said clamp, said semi-circular arms forming an area between them in which is located the material to be clamped, the outline of the area remaining the same but varying in size longitudinally and laterally, said outline comprising a pair of intersecting arcs defining a space of varying width and length but having sides of constant curvature and the ends of the space terminating in sharp points.

8. A surgical clamp comprising a pair of arms pivotally engaging one another at one end thereof, said arms having inter-engaging looking portions comprising multiple serrations on each arm at their opposite ends to lock said arms in position and roughened compression surfaces along their mid-portions, said roughened compression surfaces comprising alternate projections and depressions arranged near the outer surfaces of said clamp and having a longitudinal roughened portion therebetween.

9. A surgical clamp comprising a pair of semicircular, overlapping and interlocking arms: pivotally engaging one another at one end thereof, said arms having inter-engaging serrated looking portions comprising multiple serrations on each arm at their opposite ends to lock said arms in position, said serrations being angled to provide a ratchet slippage in one direction and a ratchet locking in the opposite direction, said semi-circular arms forming an area between them in which is located the material to be clamped, the outline of the area remaining the same but varying in size longitudinally and laterally, said outline comprising a pair of intersecting arcs defining a space of varying width and length but having sides of constant curvature and the ends of the space terminating in sharp points.

10. A surgical clamp comprising a pair of semi-circular, overlapping and interlocking arms pivotally engaging one another at one end thereof, said arms having inter-engaging serrated locking portions comprising multiple serrations on each arm at their opposite ends to lock said arms in position, said serrations being composed of alternate ridges and grooves so angled as to provide a ratchet slippage in one direction and a'ratchet locking in the opposite direction, said semi-circular arms forming an area between them in which is located the material to be clamped, the outline of the area remaining the same but varying in size longitudinally and laterally, said outline comprising a pair of intersecting arcs defining a space of varying width and length but having sides of constant curvature and the ends of the space terminating in sharp points.

FREDERICK W. DAVIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2812758 *Jul 26, 1955Nov 12, 1957Blumenschein John CSurgical retractor
US2970353 *Aug 25, 1958Feb 7, 1961Jack L PerrinClamp
US3120230 *Oct 24, 1960Feb 4, 1964Jack H SandersSurgical clamp
US3320958 *Feb 25, 1964May 23, 1967Nolan Thomas RSurgical clamp
US3602227 *Jul 18, 1969Aug 31, 1971Andrew Daniel EEndotracheal tube clamp
US4418694 *Jul 13, 1981Dec 6, 1983Ethicon, Inc.Non-metallic, bio-compatible hemostatic clips
US4449530 *Jul 15, 1981May 22, 1984Ethicon, Inc.Hemostatic clips and method of manufacture
US4813414 *Feb 5, 1986Mar 21, 1989Walton MedicalDevice for garroting the breast
US5360020 *Apr 14, 1993Nov 1, 1994Memphis Orthopaedic Design, Inc.Pin site shield retainer
US5462555 *Dec 30, 1993Oct 31, 1995United States Surgical CorporationUmbilical cord clip and applicator
US6443958 *Jun 5, 2001Sep 3, 2002Maternus Partners, Ltd.Umbilical cord clamp and cutter
US6740095 *Aug 30, 2002May 25, 2004Maternus Partners, Ltd.Umbilical cord clamp and cutter
US7402164Nov 7, 2003Jul 22, 2008Watson Jr Richard LUmbilical cord clamp and cutter
US20040172043 *Nov 7, 2003Sep 2, 2004Watson Richard L.Umbilical cord clamp and cutter
US20040215211 *May 24, 2004Oct 28, 2004Watson Richard L.Umbilical cord clamp and cutter
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/120, 24/521, 131/246
International ClassificationA61B17/122, A61B17/12
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/122
European ClassificationA61B17/122