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Publication numberUS1984422 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 18, 1934
Filing dateJul 11, 1931
Priority dateJul 11, 1931
Publication numberUS 1984422 A, US 1984422A, US-A-1984422, US1984422 A, US1984422A
InventorsNell Gustave M
Original AssigneeChicago Pneumatic Tool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid injecting and ejecting apparatus
US 1984422 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 18, 1934. s. M. NELL 1,984,422

LIQUID INJEGTING AND EJECTING APPARATUS Filed July 11, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 'I v /7 Fi E 1| wi mmmmiwg, z u

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Dec. 18, 1934. G M NELL LIQUID INJECTING AND EJECTING APPARATUS Filed July 11, 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 m mm. Gusfave M. Ne// A TTORNE Y.

' Patented Dec. 18, 1934 l v moon) INJECTING' AND nmc'rmo APPARATUS Gustave M. Nell, Detroit, Mich., assignor to Chicago Pneumatic Tool Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey a Application July 11, 1931, Serial No. 550,080

8 Claims. (61. 1184-55) This invention relates to apparatus for effectber 15 yieldingly to urge diaphragm member 14 ing movement of a fluid, as the injecting of a to one limit of its movement. A plate 18 is liquid into a fluid stream under the action of the preferably interposed between spring 1'7 and latter. While capable of many uses and with diaphragm 14 to protect the latter from invarious fluids, it has been developed in its applijury by the spring. Free communication be- 5 cation to the lubrication of fluid pressure opertween pressure chamber 16 and motive fluid ated motors, especially line oilers for rock drills. conduit 11 is established by a passage 19. To

One object of the invention is to provide fluid assist the motive fluid thus admitted to presinjecting or ejecting apparatus and devices sure chamber 16 to overcome spring 17 and which will function in any position. Another move diaphragm 14 to eject liquid, such as lu-- 10 object is to feed or eject the fluid in proportion bricant, from reservoir chamber 15, 'suitable to the movement of a fluid stream. Another obmeans are provided for reducing the pressure ject is to provide devices from which the fluid in the reservoir chamber. This may be accomwill not leak by gravity and in general to improve plished by utilizing the principle of the Venturi '15 prior devices of the described character in the tube and of a reversed Pitot tube. To this end interest of more satisfactory and eflicient service. conduit 11 is restricted at one point, as by a In order to illustrate the invention concrete cross member inserted in or integral with embodiments thereof are disclosed in the accompart 8. A nozzle 21 ext ds from ros mempanying drawings, in which: her 20 into the zone of reduced pressure created 20 Fi 1 is a p an view o a line oiler; by the latter when motive fluid is flowing 20 Figs. 2 and 3 are sectional views on a slightly through conduit 11, A passage 22 extending enlarged scale of the line oiler shown in Fig. into cross member 20 serves to connect reser- 1, the sections being taken on the lines 2-2 and voir chamber 15 with nozzle 21 and the passage 33 respectively of Fig. 1; is restricted at one point, as at 23, to produce Figs- 4 and 5 are longitudinal sectional Views any desired regulation of the flow of lubricant 25 at right angles to one another of a modified fr h b 15, form Of the invention, the SBCtiOIlS being taken To put. the device into peration, reservoir on the lines 44 and 5-5 re p iv of F chamber 15 is filled with oil by removing filler 6 is a right end elevational w o the plug 24, Figs. 1 and 3. The device is connected line oiler showni11Figs.4and 5; and into the air line so that the motive fluid will 30 7 is a right end elevational view of the flow through conduit 11 in the direction of arsame device. .row 13. When the throttle valve of the pneu- The embodiment of the invention s own in matic tool to which the air line is connected is Figs. 1 to 3 inclusive comprises a e oiler for then opened, motive fluid will flow through conpfiellmatie tools made up of Parts 3 a d 9 duit l1 producing a locality or zone of reduced 35 erally circular in form and having fla d pressure at the end of nozzle 21 as compared. Portions in abutting on c p d together with the pressure obtaining at the locality or as y a series of bolts 10. Part 8 provides a mozone into which passage 19 opens for admitting tive fluid condu t 1 having connections 12 y motive fluid to pressure chamber 16. Thus a which the oiler y be Connected into the reduced pressure, or suction, is created in reser- 40 motive fluid line at any desired point. Suitable ir ha b 15 whi1e positive pressure is ndi su as arrow ay be pp o t created in pressure chamber 16 with the result exterior of the conduit to indicate the direction that the force exerted by spring 17 is overcome in which the motive fluid should flow. The matand diaphragm 14 is moved upwardly reducing.

s portions of Parts 8 and 9 a e recessed, as the volume of reservoir chamber 15 and forcing 45 indicated in F 2 a d to form a chamb lubricant out through the :onnection 22, 23 lead- A movable member, in the pre e ins a ce a ing to nozzle 21. The flow of the lubricant is flexible d p a is p d th n t regulated by the restriction at 23, and the oil chambe as a Partition separator to divide which is forced into the motive fluid stream the same into a reservoir chamber 15 and a will be carried to the pneumatic tool to lubricate pressure chamber 16. Diaphragm 1 may exthe same. When the throttle valve is closed, tend as a gasket between the flanged portions the flow of motive fluid will cease and the presof parts 8 and 9 and be secured in place by sures in chambers 15 and 16 will become equalbolts 10. Resilient means, such as a tapered ized. Spring, 1'7 will then force diaphragm 14 to coiled spring 17, isdisposed in reservoir chamits lowermost position and movement of lubri- 5 cant into conduit 11 will cease. When the throttle valve is' again opened motive fluid which has entered through nozzle 21 into reservoir chamber 15 will be forced back through the nozzle relatively faster than the oil will move therethrough mainly on account of its lesser friction. Movement of air into reservoir chamber 15 during shut-down periods may be entirely prevented, if desired, by a check valve, such as disclosed in the modification of the invention shown in Figs. 4-7 but it has been found in practice in most cases that motive fluid or air leaves the chamber so rapidly that a check valve is not absolutely essential.

The spring 17 cooperates with the diaphragm 16 to prevent the flow of lubricant from the reservoir 15 through the nozzle 21 due to gravity alone, when the motive fluid is not flowing through the conduit. If the device shown in Fig. 2 were turned upside down, or in any other position, oil could not flow through the restriction 23 unless it were forced by fluid pressure resulting from a flow of fluid through the conduit 11. As long as the air in this conduit is stationary, pressures will be substantially equal at all points in the device, a slight pressure difference only resulting from gravity. If the spring 17 were omitted, then oil would leak from the reservoir through the restriction 23 and into line 11 due to gravity head. Applicant's spring, however, is made strong enough to counteract the gravity head. Hence, when oil starts to flow, it will tend to produce a partial vacuum or a zone of relatively lower pressure between the oil and the diaphragm as compared to the pressure in line 11 as applied at the hole 23. It will be understood that diaphragm 14, while flexible, will not stretch a great amount. Again, assuming the position of the parts to be as shown in Fig. 3 and pressures equalized when air stream in 11 is stationary, it seems obvious that the spring pressure if sufficiently great will now actually suck in air at nozzle hole 23.

The principle employed to prevent flow of oil due to gravity head alone is generally the same as that involved in the barometer. If a bottle partially full of liquid, with a stopper having a hole of the order of, say two millimeters or less is turned upside-down the liquid will stop flowing when the unit pressure above the liquid plus gravity head is approximately equal to the air pressure or unit pressure of air on the hole. When the hole is of the order of two millimeters surface tension and superficial viscosity will prevent flow even though the pressure external to the hole is slightly less than that above the liquid. If for the glass bottom of the bottle we substitute a flexible diaphragm then external pressures would be equalized and liquid would flow out of the hole. However by supporting the diaphragm in such manner that it cannot flex inward we would then have the same general performance as with the glass bottom. In order to be able to cause oil to flow when desired, applicant makes the spring only strong enough to overcome the gravity head. Hence, while there is an approximate balance with no air flowing in the conduit, the flow of airproduces sufficient diflerence in pressures to destroy this balance and oil flows.

In the form of the invention shown in Figs. 4-7 inclusive, the lubricator casing is formed of tubular parts 8a and 9a in telescoping relation, part 90. providing the inlet for the motive fluid and part 8a the outlet. The two parts cooperate to provide a chamber with an open end toward the motive fluid inlet and a movable partition member, in this instance a piston 14a slidably engaging the interior of part 8a, divides the chamber into a reservoir chamber 15a and a pressure chamber 16a, the latter communicating directly and unrestrictedly with the motive fluid inlet. The telescoping portions or members 8a and 9a are in spaced relation to provide a passage 11a surrounding chambers 15a and 16a, and passages 8a in member 811 on either side of a transverse portion corresponding to cross member 20 in the first form of the invention establish a restricted connection to the outlet. Nozzle 21a projects into the zone of reduced pressure in the outlet and communicates with reservoir chamber 15a through a restriction at 23a having a check valve 23a to prevent movement of fluid therethrough into chamber 15a. A coil spring 17a yieldingly urges piston 14a to the right to maintain reservoir 15a at its maximum volume and pressure chamber 16a at its minimum. To reduce the weight of the device piston 14a may be made quite short and have an extension 14a with a three point contact head 14a engaging the rigid motive fluid conduit extending from coupling 12a to prevent angular displacement of piston 14a. Piston 14a must have a rather close fit with the interior of part 8a and the space between the telescoping portions of parts 8a and 9a serves an additional purpose in preventing the chamber wall with which piston 140. has sliding contact from being dented or distorted from the shocks encountered in service. Reservoir chamber 15:: is filled through an inlet opening closed by a plug 24a. Although the structural arrangement is somewhat different from the form shown in Figs. 1-3, the manner of operation is identical save that on shutting down motive fluid there is no leakage of the latter back into reservoir chamber 15a by reason of check valve 23a but equalization is established by the action of spring 17a against the fluid pressure in chamber 16a.

From the above it will be apparent that both forms of the device will function in all positions from horizontal to upside down and in any vertical-or angular position and that the differential pressure, which is made of sufllcient force to counteract the gravity head, will prevent the oil from running or leaking into the motive fluid line in any position in which the device is standing without motive fluid thereon or when the pneumatic tool is not running and all the air pressures are equalized. In addition both forms of the device will cause oil to flow into the motive fluid line in amounts approximately proportional to the amount of air flow.

While the invention has been herein shown and disclosed in what are now considered to be preferred forms, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the specific details thereof,'but covers all changes, modifications, and adaptations within the scope of the appended claims.

. I claim as my invention:

1. A line oiler for fluid pressure tools comprising a conduit for motive fluid, a chamber adjacent said conduit, a flexible diaphragm dividing said chamber into a lubricant reservoir chamber and a motive fluid pressure chamber and sealing said chambers from each other, passages leading from the lubricant and pressure chambers respectively to spaced points along said conduit adapted to have diflerent pressures when motive fluid is flowing through said conduit, the lubricant passage being restricted, thereby requiring the application of pressure to said diaphragm for effecting egress of fluid from said reservoir into the conduit, and resilient means in said lubricant chamber and engaging the diaphragm for yieldingly urging the latter in a position of maximum size for said lubricant chamber, whereby to prevent gravity flow of lubricant through said restricted passage when motive fluid is not flowing through the conduit.

2. A liquid ejecting device having a conduit for motive fluid, means including a member extending across said conduit for providing localities of difiering pressure when motive fluid is flowing therethrough, a chamber, a movable member in said chamber dividing the same into a reservoir chamber and a pressure chamber, connections from said chambers to said conduit at said localities of differing pressures to eflect movement of said movable member in one direction, one of said connections comprising a restricted outlet for the liquid, and means for effecting reverse movement of said member when motive fluid is not flowing in said conduit, whereby to prevent flow of liquid through said outlet due to gravity.

3. A liquid ejecting device having a conduit for motive fluid, means including a restriction in said conduit for providing localities of difiering pressure when motive fluid is flowing therethrough, a chamber, a movable member in said chamber dividing the same into a reservoir chamber and a pressure chamber, connections from said chambers to said conduit at said localities of differing pressures to eflect movement of said movable member in one direction one 01' said connections comprising a restricted outlet for the liquid, and a spring engaging said member for effecting reverse movement of the same when motive fluid is not flowing in said conduit, whereby to prevent leakage of liquid through said outlet due to gravity.

4. In a liquid ejecting device, a casing providing a chamber, a movable separator member in said chamber dividing the same into a chamber for liquid and a chamber for pressure fluid, means urging said member in a direction to increase the volume of said liquid chamber and proportionately to decrease said pressure chamber, said casing providing a motive fluid passageway, a cross member in said passageway forming a restriction, a nozzle. protruding from said member into a zone of reduced pressure when motive fluid is flowing through said passageway, a restricted connection from said nozzle to said liquid chamber, and a connection from said passageway to said pressure chamber for supplying motive fluid at substantially i'ull pressure to the latter.

5. A liquid ejecting device comprising open ended tubular members in telescoping engagement providing a chamber open at one end, the inner or said members having a portion in spaced relation to the outer or said members to provide a passage exteriorly of said chamber from the open end thereof to the opposite end of said device, a piston slidably mounted in said chamber and having a guide extension projecting through said open end, a coil spring engaging the opposite or inner side of said piston, a nozzle extending into a zone of reduced pressure in said passage at a point remote from said open end, a restricted connection from said nozzle to the closed end of said chamber, and a check valve in said connection.

6. A liquid ejecting device comprising open ended tubular members in telescoping engagement providing a chamber open at one end, the inner of said members having a portion in spaced relation to the outer 01' 'said members to provide a passage exteriorly of said chamber from the open end thereof to the opposite end of said device, a piston slidably mounted in said chamber and having a guide extension projecting through said open end, a coil spring engaging the opposite or inner side of said piston, a nozzle extending into a zone of reduced pressure in said passage at a point remote from said open end, and a restricted connection from said nozzle to the closed end of said chamber.

'7. A line oiler comprising two telescoping tubular members, spaced to provide an annular passage therebetween, the inner member having an end wall closed except for a nozzle extending therethrough, the outer member having an end wall apertured to receive an inlet conduit for motive fluid, an outlet conduit surrounding the nozzle, said conduits communicating with each other through said annular passage, a piston siidable in said inner member and providing a lubricant chamber between the piston and the end wall of the inner member, said piston and inlet conduit being coaxial, and a guide secured to said piston and extending into said inlet conduit.

8. An air line oiler comprising two telescoping tubular members spaced to provide a passage therebetween, the inner member having an end wall defining one end of a lubricant chamber, the other end being defined by a piston movable in said chamber, a restricted nozzle extending from the lubricant chamber through the flrstnamed wall and projecting into a continuation of said passage, an inlet conduit for motive fluid leading to said passage and to the piston for forcing the latter in the direction to contract the lubricant chamber as long as motive fluid is flowing through said conduit and passageway, and a spring in said lubricant chamber acting against the piston to enlarge the chamber, whereby to prevent gravity flow of lubricant through the nozzle after the motive fluid has stopped flowing.

GUSTAVE M. NELL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2604189 *Jan 28, 1950Jul 22, 1952Chicago Pneumatic Tool CoLine oiler
US2897919 *Mar 21, 1957Aug 4, 1959Westinghouse Air Brake CoAirline oiler
US2982376 *Feb 24, 1958May 2, 1961Ingersoll Rand CoAir line lubricator
US3033223 *Mar 25, 1959May 8, 1962Volpin Alexander SAutomatic sealant-lubricant supply fitting for pressure vessels
US3040835 *Oct 27, 1960Jun 26, 1962Mid Western Machinery CompanyAir line lubricator
US3595342 *Sep 16, 1969Jul 27, 1971Oleary Paul COiler system and device
US3659675 *Jul 7, 1969May 2, 1972Transportation Specialists IncLubrication system and reservoir therefor
US3724601 *Jun 16, 1970Apr 3, 1973Scragg EMethod of lubricating pneumatic machines and apparatus therefor
US4174767 *Nov 10, 1976Nov 20, 1979West Rand Engineering Works (Proprietary) LimitedAir-line lubricators and the like
US4195711 *Sep 6, 1978Apr 1, 1980Castrol South Africa (Proprietary) LimitedDevice for dosing a flowing fluid stream with an additive
US4483417 *Jul 28, 1982Nov 20, 1984La-Man CorporationAirline lubricator
Classifications
U.S. Classification184/55.1, 184/39
International ClassificationF16N7/00, F16N7/34
Cooperative ClassificationF16N7/34
European ClassificationF16N7/34