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Publication numberUS1984784 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 18, 1934
Filing dateJun 14, 1930
Priority dateJun 14, 1930
Publication numberUS 1984784 A, US 1984784A, US-A-1984784, US1984784 A, US1984784A
InventorsJames A Cameron
Original AssigneeCameron Machine Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Winding machine
US 1984784 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. A. CAMERON WINDING MACHINE Dec. 18, 1934.

2 Shets-Sheet 1 Filed Jude 14. 1950 i lurin "E528 anomtoz Dec. 18, 1934. I J. A. CAMERON WINDING MACHINE Filed June 14, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented nice. 18, 1934 UNITED STATES WINDING MACHINE James A. Cameron, Brooklyn, N. Y., assignor to Cameron Machine Company, Brooklyn,

- corporation of New York N. Y., a

Application June 14, 1930, Serial No. 461,104

Claims.

different flexible materials, or materials of sup-' posedly uniform character, but which as a matter of fact may vary considerably from atheoretical standard.

In the accompanying drawings, the invention is disclosed in a concrete and preferred form in Fig. 1 is a view in side elevation of a winding machine embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary view in front elevation looking in the direction of arrow 2 in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional detail view substantially on the plane of line 3-3 of Fig. 1; and

Figs. 4, 5 and 6 are diagrammatic views to illustrate different uses of the invention.

1 indicates a winding shaft on which flexible material 2 is wound. Associated with this winding shaft is a plurality of surface winding rollers that in the present exemplification of the invention consists of two surface winding drums 3 and 4 and a riding or top pressure roller 5. The operation of devices of' this kind is wellnnderstood, but may be briefly summarized as follows: drums 3 and 4 are spaced apart and rotate in the same direction. and support, in the valley between them, the winding shaft. Top pressure or riding roller 5 rests on top of the wound material and cooperate with drums 3 and 4 in winding the material. Winding shaft 1 and top pressure roller 5 are displaceabie in an upward direction in response to an increase in diameter of the wound material. A web 6 is lead into the machine and passes over the various rollers to the winding shaft, which latter is rotated by the surface contact of the winding rollers with the accumulated-materiaL Machines of this type are employed in the winding of flexible materials of highly diversified character, some of the materials so acted upon being paper, cloth, leather,- rubber, celluloid, and tinfoil. It will be understood that although all of these materials possess the property of flexibility in common, they do so to a different degree, and, in addition, they have characteristics that are entirely different, that is, some are smooth, some are rough, some are tacky or sticky, etc. Indeed the single word paper covers a multitude of grades of material from onion-skin and tissue paper to cardboard, and it is well known that, even in the same run of paper, considerable variations will occur, On account of the different operating conditions that the machine has to deal with, it will be understood that it is highly desirable to have the machine easily adjustable to thereby accommodate it to such different conditions, some of which conditions occur at times during the same run. I have found that different relative trac tive effects of the winding rollers upon the material produce differently wound products and, conversely, different materials require different relative tractive effects of the winding rollers to compensate for the peculiar characteristics of the particular material being wound. The relative tractive effect of the winding rollers can most easily be changed by altering their speed relationship, and by way of illustration, but not of limitation, the following device is described. Each of the winding rollers is provided with a loosely mounted sprocket, indicated at 3*, 4 and 5, and a flexible transmission element. such as chain 7, passes over all of these sprockets, there being suitable idlers, such as sprocket pinions 8 and 9 and sprocket 10, to properly train the chain around sprockets 3', 4 and 5. Motion may be imparted to this chain by any suitable means such as pulley 11 here shown as forming a part of sprocket 4. Mounted on the shaft of each winding roller is-a clutch member, indicated at 3*, 4 and 5", and it will be seen that each clutch member is keyed to its shaft so as to be rotatable therewith and slidable thereon. Said clutch members are therefore adapted to engage and disengage complementary clutch members 3, 4 and 5 on the sprockets, whereby all of the winding rollers may be positively driven or one or more rendered idle. Manifestly, when all the winding rollers are positively driven, a different effect will be produced than when one or more of said winding rollers are idle and therefore have to be rotated by the 4 wound material. It is further to be observed that not only can the machine be adjusted for different runs of different materials, but it can also be adjusted during the same run and, what is of the highest importance, without interrupting the winding operation. Let us take a concrete example of such a condition. In Fig. 5 is shown diagrammatically the same arrangement of the parts as that disclosed in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. t will be seen that web 6 passing over guide roll 12 comes thereafter in contact with roller 4, where it may be slitted by slitter 13, and thence passes to roller 3 and upwardly around the same to the winding shaft. Roller 3 therefore acts as a breast-roller and is subjected to vastly more strain than roller 4 and it will be understood that the tractive effect of the two rollers, in the web, is differentv Suppose now that it is desired to wind a roll of material with a very hard core. This can be accomplished by disconnecting roller 3 from the transmission means. That means that the wound material must now drive roller 3, and the reluctance of the latter to turn will tend to tighten the convolutions of the wound material and produce a harder roll of material than would otherwise be the case. If now during the winding operation it is for any reason desired to change this relationship, then the clutch of member 3 can be thrown in and the clutch of member 5' be thrown out; or, all of the clutches can be thrown in, or that of roller 4 can be thrown out. Roller 3, being the breast roll, may be provided with the so-called Johnstone grooves 14, said grooves acting here not merely as separating grooves for the slitted web sections, as explained in Patents Nos. 1,355,106 and 1,355,107 but also as a means of varying the tractive effect of roller 3, because said grooves. which are devoid of sharp corners, will allow the paper to sink into the valley of the grooves and will thus cause the paper to adhere more closely to the surface of roller 3.

The foregoing describes but one of many different operating conditions that can be produced. Thus in Fig. 4 the web is threaded around roller 40 and up between rollers 30 and 40 to winding shaft 100. In this case, slitter 130 acts against roller 40. If desired, with this ar rangement, roller 40 could have its clutch disconnected and rollers 30 and 50 could be driven positively, or any other arrangement could be produced at the will of the operator. In Fig. 6 breast roller 300 acts also as a cutter or backing roller to cooperate with slitter 1300. The web here passes first to roller 400, thence to roller 300 and to winding shaft 1000 and under roller 500.

The slitting means, if used, may take any form such as overlapping rotary shears or, as

shown in the drawings, score cut slitters acting against a smooth-face backing roller, which latter, may or may not be one of the winding rollers. In any event, if score-cut slitting means are employed, the backing roller should have a glass-hard surface in accordance with the wellknown Cameron principle.

I claim:

1. In a winding machine, a winding shaft to be frictionally driven by means that engage the surface of flexible material accumulated thereon, two surface winding rollers spaced apart and rotatable in the same direction to support, in the valley between them, said winding shaft, one of said winding rollers being frictionally driven by the material being wound, and having circumferential grooves in its surface that are devoid of abrupt corners, means to positively drive the other roller, and means to guide a web to the frictionally driven roller and thereafter to the winding shaft.

2. In a winding machine, a winding shaft to be frictionally driven by means that engage the surface of flexible material accumulated thereon, two surface winding rollers spaced apart and rotatable in the same direction to support, in the valley between them, said winding shaft, one of said winding rollers constituting a breast roll that is frictionally driven by the material being wound, and having circumferential grooves in its surface that are devoid of abrupt corners, means to positively drive the other roller, and means to guide a web to the frictionally driven roller and thereafter to the winding shaft.

3. In a winding machine, a winding shaft to be frictionally driven by means that engage the surface of flexible material accumulated thereon, two surface winding rollers spaced apart and rotatable in the same direction to support, in the valley between them, said winding shaft, a top pressure surface Winding roller to engage the surface of the material on said shaft, a flexible transmission means common to all of said rollers, and means to connect or disconnect said rollers and transmission means.

4. In a winding machine, a winding shaft to be frictionally driven by means that engage the surface of flexible material accumulated. thereon, two surface winding rollers spaced apart and rotatable in the same direction to support, in the valley between them, said winding shaft, a toppressure surface winding roller to engage the surface of the material on said shaft, a flexible transmission means common to all of said rollers, and means to connect or disconnect said rollers, one independently of the others, with said transmission means.

5. In a winding machine, a winding shaft to be frictionally driven by means that engage the surface of flexible material accumulated thereon, a plurality of surface winding rollers to frictionally engage the material on the shaft one of said rollers having circumferential grooves devoid of abrupt corners, means to drive said rollers, and means to vary the speed relationship of the rollers to thereby vary the tractive effect upon the material of that roller which has the circumferential grooves.

JAMES A. CAMERON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3878666 *Apr 4, 1973Apr 22, 1975Glory Kogyo KkPrevention of wrapper slack in coin wrapping apparatus
US4458853 *Jul 17, 1981Jul 10, 1984Jagenberg AgApparatus for the separate winding of slit webs
US5386950 *Jun 8, 1992Feb 7, 1995Abt; RichardApparatus and method for preparing individual wound rolls from a slitted web of material
US5431358 *Jul 26, 1993Jul 11, 1995Alexander, Iii; William J.Web roll support apparatus and method
US6149098 *Sep 10, 1997Nov 21, 2000Voith Sulzer Papiermaschinen GmbhProcess to spool a longitudinally cut material sheet and a device to execute the process
US6260789May 28, 1999Jul 17, 2001Voith Sulzer Papiertechnik Patent GmbhMulti-carrying-roll winder
DE973729C *Mar 10, 1951May 19, 1960Pierre HanssenPapierwickelmaschine, insbesondere zum Aufteilen von Papierrollen in Streifen
DE1228223B *Mar 9, 1965Nov 10, 1966Kleindienst & CoAufwickelvorrichtung im Anschluss an eine Buegelmaschine
DE19824619A1 *Jun 2, 1998Dec 16, 1999Voith Sulzer Papiertech PatentDoppeltragwalzenwickler
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/541.5, 242/542.4, 242/542
International ClassificationB65H18/20
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2404/43, B65H2301/414866, B65H18/20, B65H2404/434, B65H2403/942
European ClassificationB65H18/20