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Publication numberUS1985901 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 1, 1935
Filing dateMay 5, 1933
Priority dateMay 5, 1933
Publication numberUS 1985901 A, US 1985901A, US-A-1985901, US1985901 A, US1985901A
InventorsLiles Thomas O
Original AssigneeLilesmotor Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mechanical movement
US 1985901 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 1, 1935. 'r. o. LILES MECHANICAL MOVEMENT Filed May 5, 1953 5 Sheets-Sheeii 1 I gwugznto o 770ma-s air #65,

Jan. 1, 1935. T, o. LILES 1,985,901

ME cccccccccccccc NT Jan. 1, 1935. O Es 1,985,901

MECHAN ICAL MOVEMENT Filed May 5, 1933 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 \k 2.5 REC I'PR 0 CAT ION OF SLEEVE, 1O

I I z I z l l zqv gm wanton Tho/72x25 OLfleg ROTATION or SHAFT 11 Patented Jan. 1, 1935 of Texas 17 Claims.

This invention relates to; mechani o mentsand more particularly to a mechanism for converting or changing movement of one kind into movement of; another. In its-more intense aspect it is directedto the inter-conversion of rotary and linear or reciprocatory motions.

In order that a clearer perception of the present invention may be had, it is known that various means havebeen devised from time to time for converting rotary motion into linear motion, or vice versa, depending upon the relative location of the driving and driven elements in the mechanism, The'present invention isdirected more especially to that-type of mechanism in which the relative rotative movement of one part, for example, produce a multiple of that movement in a reciprocatory manner of the other member. e Y 7 1 Accordingly, one of the objects of the present invention; is to provide a simple and practical mechanical movement of the above generalchar acter, having relatively few parts which may be.

inexpensively manufactured and assembled. V

' A further object is to providea mechanism of the above character in which the motive means may be applied to either of the two main parts for producing a driven movement of the other. A further, object is to provide mechanism of the last above-mentioned character, in which the parts are so -positioned and-arranged as to produce an even torque on one part when acted upon by theother'. v r

A'further object is to provide areliable and eflicient mechanism which will be durable in construction; and substantially frictionless in operation.; P v Other objects will be in part obvious fromIthe annexed drawings and in part hereinafter indicated in conr'iection therewith by the following analysis of this invention. r v 'Thisinvention accordingly consists in the features. of construction, combination .of parts and in the unique relation of themembers and in the relative proportioning and disposition thereof, all 7 as more completely outlined herein. I To enable others skilled in the art to compre hend fullyjthe underlying features of this in vention that they may embody the same by the numerous modifications in structure and relation contemplated by the invention, drawings depicting a preferred form of the invention have been annexedias part of this disclosure, and in such drawings like characters of reference denote'corA responding parts throughout all of the views, in, -which. r

Thomas 0. Liles, Dallas, T assiiznor' 't'o' Lile motor Corporatiofh, Dallas,'"Tex., arcorp'oration Fig.,1 is a; sectional elevational view illustrate ing one form or embodiment of the device; y V i "Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional viewtaken substantially; onthe line-22 ;of Fig. 1; z

Fig. '3 is a ,perspective'view of the two main elements, partly in section or-partly broken away; Fig. 4 .is-adevelopment of one of ,thejcyline drical members showing the relative :shape-and location of; thegrooves, four in number; Fig. 51 is a diagrammatie'or. schematic view showing successive positions on-the center lines of two cooperating camgrooves, one-on the inner or rotating member and the other on the outer or reciprocating member and their relative positions after having traversed through j successive quadrants or periods'of'motion; c i v t Fig. e illustrates a modification of the mechanismshown in Fig. '1 i It is unnecessary to go in to'; the numerous applications and. uses of am echanicalmovement of this character; in fact,. it;can beused in almost any mechanism or machine where movement of one kind is adapted to ,be converted into movement of another kindwherein these movements. are of rotary and reciprocatory character. In Fig. 1 wherein is illustrated in its simplest form one embodiment ,of; thesinvention, let, it be assumed that lo -indicates an, outer cylin drical sleeve conveniently secured againstrotation,;-which, for convenienc e, will betermed-the driving member, while 11 indicates a shaftcen trally andtelescopicallydisposed withrespect to,

the sleeve 10 and having keyed thereto,-as at'12,-; I

a fly wheel 13 or the likefrom whichrpoweris' delivered. Associated with the sleeve 10 aregtwo rods 114' which are ,connected to any suitable source of powen such as a gas or-steam; engine cylinder, for producing j reciprocation g of :thef

sleeve; and this sleeve-is adapted-3 through" cam mechanism hereinafter described,, to--cause a rotary movement of the shaft lland'the'driven fly wheel 13. 'Conversely,: the fly wheel 13 may be driven fromany suitable source of power,such as a motor, thereby to produce a reciprocatory movement ofthe parts14. j For convenience of assembly, the sleeve 10 may be formed of two ormorepartsipermitting of readyassembly about the shaft'll and over.

balls 20,-;hereinafter referred to; :Thisa sleeve reciprocatesupon the shaft llwand is'provided with an outer member 15: adapted 'to be slipped endwise over the sleeve tolabut a collar 16 atone endand to be held in locked. position bysmea'ris of 'annulus 17. Theinternalidiameter of the" sleeve 10 is preferably slightly larger than the pleting "the cycle.

external diameter of the shaft 11, although the parts may be of substantially the same diameter,

ly centered, and the balls or rollers when so positioned provide an even and uniform transmission of power from one to the other,freefrom tortional strains. The spacing. member or ball retainer 18 may be cylindrical inshape as'shown more clearly in Fig. 2.

There is indicated at 21 a supporting frame of any desired character, depending upon the use to which the mechanical movement is put, and the shaft 11 is provided with bearings 22 and rollers 23 thereby to eliminate'friction as much as possible. v s ,1

The internal surface ofthe sleeve mnemvided with a series of cam grooves 24 substantially hemispherical in cross se'ction, and in which balls or rollers are adapted to have'relative'movement. These grooves extend entirely around the'inner-surf-ace ofthe sleeve, thereby to have a wave-like motion as 'more clearly shown in Fig 4, illustrating a development of these'grooves. The external su-rface'of the shaft 11 is also provided with "complementary or co acting grooves 25 which are similar in size and shape except for such changes as may be necessary due to differences in the internal and external diameters of the sleeve and shaftrespectively, but these gro'oves are operatively oppositely positioned as clearly appears in either Fig. 1 or Fig. 8', or Fig; 5.

As shown in 'Fig. 5, illustrating the relative position of a single wave of each of these grooves 24 and 25 as the shaft rotates with respect to the reciprocatorymovement of the sleeve 10, for example, we find that-the rollers or balls drift laterally back and forth as one part reclprocates to cause rotation of the other, or the grooves in the two main members cooperate with the interposed roller resulting in a progressive reciprocatory movement of the sleeve as the shaft rotates twice the relative movement of the rollers, or vice versa, When the rollers reach thecrest of the cam grooves, then an opposite movement of the reciprocating member occurs causing continued rotative movement of the shaft, thus com- Referring'now particularly to'Figure in which groove 2430f the reciprocating element is represented by'the line of dashes and its position at one end of reciprocative movement as illustrated in the figure as 24a, it will travel in the direction of the double pointed arrow to a position indicated-as 24b, 24c and 24d in one direction, then in reversea like distance. In Figure 5 it will be noted that the movement laterally of sleeve 10 is equal to twice the distance between a line drawn through the apices or points of the grooves. The full line represents the groove '25 of the shaftill, it being noted that for purposes'of a simple and clear description'of the relative action between the partsa single groove each is shown. It will be further noted that along the groove 24 from 2442 to 241 is one-half of a single groove 24. Likewise the distance from 25a to 25b is onehalf of groove'25, the two points '25a and 25b being-on opposite sides of shaft-11.

. Starting with ball 20 .at 24e of groove 24, as that groove moves toward position 241) the ball will travel along groove 24 in the direction indicated by the arrow pointing along groove 24 from point 246 and will travel along groove 25 from point 246 in the direction of the arrow along that groove from point 24c, but will drift in the direction of rotation of shaft 11, also in the direction of movement of sleeve.'10,.so that when sleeve 10 has brought groove 24 to the position indicated at 241), shaft 11 will have been caused to rotate and groove 25 will occupy the position indicated as 250 by the XXX line, and ball 20 will then-occupy position 20a. As sleeve 10 qbri-ngs groove. 24-to the position indicated at 24c,

shaft 11 willlhave been caused to rotate in the direction of the arrow 25 and groove 25 will oc- 24d, ball 20 will-then occupy the position 20c,

shaft 11 having been rotated one-half revolution, the point 25a now occupying the position shown as 251), Fig. 5, while'ball 20 has moved about the shaft 11 a distance equal to one-quarter of its circumference and has moved laterally of sleeve 10 a distance of one-half of the distance of the travel of sleeve 10. V On the return stroke of the sleeve 10, the shaft continuing to rotate in its same direction, the -bal'1 '20 from point 200 will take the direction along groove 25 indicated by the arrow along the groove '25 at 20c and along groove 24 as indicated by the arrow along groove 24 at point 200. When groove 24 has returned to the position indicated at 24c, groove 25 again has moved into a position opposite thereto and ball 20 has'moved into the position 2011, and moveson to position 20c at the end of the stroke returning sleeve 10 to its original p'osition, while shaft 11 has been caused to rotate another one-half revolution and points 25a and 25b occupy their original respective positions.

It will be noted that while sleeve 10 has completed two strokes or cycles and returned to its original'position, shaft l1 has been caused to rotate one complete revolution and'ball'2 0has moved to a point with relation to shaft 11 ex a-ctly opposite from its starting point.' i

With two balls 20 in grooves 24 and 25, one each at 24c and 24 their actions'woui'd coincide throughout and the ballat'point 24c would arrive at 24 and the ball 20 originally at 24 would arrive at 24c on one complete revolution of shaft 11. I

It of course is readily understood that any number of grooves 24 and 25 may be employed as desired and that the action of balls 20 would be the same in each groove. Also that the number of'points in the grooves may be varied to effect any rotation of the shaft desired relative tothereciprocating action of the sleeve.

While I have "described in detail the*action of tially 0 the harmonic'motion type having uni formly accelerated, and retarded end motions in order to prevent shocks whenathe direction of .motionfof one member,-that is, thereciprocating sleeve, for example, changes, in order to obtain a gradual change of velocity of the sleeves atxthe ends of "the period of movement and to give auniformrotative movement of the shaft when and if the shaft is the driven member. Conversely, if the shaft is the'driven member, thiswould probably be operated at a uniform rate of speed as by amotor, for example, in which case the sleeve may be. reciprocated withoutpounding at'tthe ends of its stroke. Modification of the grooves, however, and thekresulting movement may be employed to'cause a pounding if actually I a, 7 i

noted/that therollerfmeans or balls 20am of the freely floa'ting type as distinguished frommechamsmstiof this broad general character where-the rollers occupies a relatively fixed position with respect to one of the members. This reciprocative' movement, which'is more apparent in Fig.

' 5, isiequal'to twice the movement heretofore pro- 'duced where the-roller occupied a fixed position. This ratio obviously may be modified by a modification of the cams, as for example, to produce twice the number of reciprocations relative to the number of rotations of the other main member by simply increasing the number of waves.

In Fig. 6 there is illustrated diagrammatically a modification in which the sleeve member is provided with a fly wheel or gear-31 thereby to produce a rotation of the sleeve and a consequent reciprocation of the internal member or part 32, heretofore called the shaft. This element maybe connected as by'means of a piston rod 33, provided with a piston 34 traversing in any form of cylinder 35. Likewise, if motive means is applied to the piston 34 to cause a reciprocation of the part 32, then '31 becomes-the driven member'and delivers rotation.

' From the above it will be seen, with particular reference to Fig; 5 showing developed but one wave in each member, that in operation, as one member rotates, the ball or roller 20 is carried relatively up one cam incline and relatively down the other cam incline, thereby drifting gradually towards one side and then the other,

which'causes a progressive lateral and multiple movement of the other member as the first mem--' ber rotates. U From the foregoing it will be seenthat the present invention contemplates 'a simple and practical mechanical movement. well adapted to accomplish among others all of the objects and advantages herein set forth. The device is strong and-durable in construction and has relatively few parts which may be easily manufactured and quickly assembled. The device is equally applicable to a rotary driving or driven member, or to a reciprocating driving or driven member. In either case the relative movement of one member is a multiple of the relative movement of the other, as distinguished from prior devices of this general character.

Without further analysis the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of this invention that others can by applying current knowledge readily adapt it for various applications without omitting certain features that, from the standpoint of the prior art, fairly constitute essential characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of this invention, and therefore such adaptations should and are intended to be comprehended within the.

In=this mechanism, it is particularly ts/be meaningiand rangeof equivalency. of theifollovw. ing claims. p: 'I'I 'claimi i I. A mechanism driving and'adriven member, m of which may be a grooved sleeve an'dthe other a grooved for converting movement .of, one kindinto movement of. another; including a shaft, and"-means. operatively connecting said parts including a floating roller in the grooves whereby as one member rotatesthe. other r6 ciprocates. 1.. 25A mechanism for converting movement- 0f one kind into movement of another, includingia driving memberand adriven member, one- 0f which may be'a' grooved sleeve'and the other a grooved shaftgand means operatively connecting' s'aidparts including a floating roller infthe grooves whereby as one member rotates theoth'er reciprocat'es, said floating roller 'a'nd grooves permitting a relative movement of one member e'quaL-to" a multiple the other}? W '3. A mechanismfor converting movement of one kind intomovem'ent of another, including a driving member'and; a driven"member,fo'ne of which may be a grooved sleeve and the omega grooved shaft, and means operatively connect ing said parts including a floatingroller inthe grooves whereby as one member rotates the other reciprocates, said grooves being of the harmonic motion type. p i 4-. A mchanism'for converting movementof of a a developed movement of one kind into movement-of another, includinga driving member and a driven memberf-oneo'f which may be agrooved sleeve and the other a one kind into movement of another, including a driving member an'd a driven 'membery one 'o f which may be a grooved sleeve and the other a grooved shaft, and means operatively connecting said parts including a floating roller in the grooves whereby as one member rotates the other I reciprocates, said floatingroller-and groovesfpermitting a relative movement ofone member equal to a multiple of a developed'movement ofjthe other, said grooves being of the harmonic'motion type. j V

6. A mechanism for converting movement of one kind into movement of another, including a driving member and a driven member, one: of which may be a grooved sleeve and the other a grooved shaft, and means operatively connecting said parts including a floating roller in the grooves whereby as one member rotates the other reciprocates, said floating rollerand grooves permitting a relative movement of one member equal to a multiple of a devolped movement of the other,

said grooves being of the harmonic motion type with portions giving uniformly accelerated and retarded changes in velocity of the member having a change in its direction of motion.

7. Apparatus for the inter-conversion of rotary and linear motion consisting of a pair of telescoping main members having their adjacent surfaces of cylindrical shape provided with coacting grooves, a floating rotarymember engaging with the grooves whereby upon linear movement of one of the main members the other will be caused to rotate. V

8. Apparatus for the inter-conversion of rotary and linear motion consisting of a pair of telescoping main members having their adjacent surfaces of cylindrical shape provided with coacting grooves partially in registry, floating rtary members equidistantly spaced of the main members engaging with the grooves whereby upon linear movement of one of the main members the other will be caused to rotate, and means securing the, floating rotary members longitudinally of the main members.

. 9. A mechanism for converting movementof one kind into movement of another, including a driving member and a driven member. one of which maybe a grooved sleeve and the other a grooved shaft, and means operatively-connect ing said parts including a floating roller in the grooves whereby as one member rotates the other reciprocates, the groovesin each of the driving and driven members being plural in number and having a plurality of rollers in each groove.

10. A mechanism for converting movement of one kind; into movement of another, including a driving member and a driven member, one of which may be a grooved sleeve and, the other a grooved shaft, and means operatively connecting said parts including, a floating roller in the grooves whereby as one member rotates the other reciprocates, each of the driving and driven members having a plurality of grooves and a plurality ofrollers in each groove, and a spacer interposed between the driving and driven members for holding the rollers in relative position.

1 1. A mechanism forconverting movement of one kind into movement of another, including a driving member and a driven member, one of which may be a grooved sleeve and the other a grooved shaft, and means operatively connecting said parts including a floating roller in the grooves whereby as one member rotates the other reciprocates, said floating roller and grooves permitting a relative movement of onemember equal to a multiple of a developed movement of the other, each of the driving and driven members having a plurality of grooves and a plurality of rollers in each groove.

12. A mechanism for converting movement of one kind into movement of another, including a driving member and a driven member, one of which maybe a grooved sleeve and the other a grooved shaft, and means operatively connecting said parts including a floating roller in the grooves whereby as one member rotates the other reciprocates, saidfloating roller and grooves permitting a relative movement of one member equal to a multiple of a developed movement'of the other,

each of the driving and driven members having a plurality of grooves and a plurality of rollers in each groove, and a spacer interposed between the d'rivingand driven members for holding the rollers in relative position.

13. Apparatus for the inter-conversion of rotary and linear motion consistingof a pair of telescoping main members having their adjacent surfaces of cylindrical contourprovided with coasting grooves, a floating rotary member engaging'with the grooves whereby upon linear movement of one'of the main members the other will be caused to rotate, each of the driving and driven members having a plurality of grooves and a plurality of rollers in each groove.

14. Apparatus for the inter-conversion 0! r0- tary and lineanmotion consisting of a pair of telescoping main members having their adjacent surfaces of cylindrical shape provided with coacting grooves,.a floating rotary member engaging with the grooves whereby upon linear movement of one of the main members the other will be caused to rotate, each of the driving and driven members having a plurality of grooves and a plurality of rollers in each groove, and a spacer interposed between the driving and driven members for holding the rollers in relative position.

15. A mechanism for converting movement of one kind into movement of another, including a driving member and a driven member, one of which maybe a grooved sleeve and the other a grooved shaft, and means operatively connecting said parts including a floating roller in the grooves whereby as one member rotates the other reciprocates, each of the driving and driven members having a plurality of grooves and a plurality of rollers in each groove, and a spacer interposed between the driving and driven members for holding the rollers in relative position both longitudinally and circumferentially.

16. A mechanism for converting movement of one kind into movement of another, including a driving and a driven member, one of which may bea grooved sleeve and the other a grooved shaft, and means operatively connecting said parts including a plurality of balls held circumferentially and longitudinally spaced in the grooves whereby as one member rotates the other reciprocates.

17. In a mechanism of the character described, in combination, a rotary member, a reciprocating member, both of which are provided with grooves and a floating roller connecting said members and traveling in said grooves whereby the rotary movement of one is converted into the reciprocating movement of the other.

THOMAS O. LILES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2539921 *Jun 7, 1947Jan 30, 1951Neisingh Walter JTool actuating unit
US2751789 *May 21, 1953Jun 26, 1956Emil OrenickMechanical movement
US3482472 *Mar 11, 1968Dec 9, 1969Contraves AgTransmission
US3703104 *Dec 21, 1970Nov 21, 1972Tamplen Jack WPositioning apparatus employing driving and driven slots relative three body motion
US4439011 *Dec 8, 1981Mar 27, 1984Ernst Leitz Wetzlar GmbhApparatus for focusing an optical system
US4597302 *Oct 15, 1981Jul 1, 1986Mclendon Jr MartinMotion interconversion apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/57, 74/569
International ClassificationF16H25/00, F16H25/12
Cooperative ClassificationF16H25/12
European ClassificationF16H25/12