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Publication numberUS1987632 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1935
Filing dateJun 8, 1933
Priority dateJun 8, 1933
Publication numberUS 1987632 A, US 1987632A, US-A-1987632, US1987632 A, US1987632A
InventorsClifford Holdsworth, Nutter William S
Original AssigneeGoodall Worsted Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mohair warp yarn and method of producing same
US 1987632 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 15, 1935. w. s. NUTTER ET AL MOHAIR WARP YARN AND METHOD OF PRODUCING SAME Filed Jqne 8, 1933 \nvenTors. WiHium S. NuTLer CHFFord Holdsworth WMMJ'W Aflys.

Patented Jan. 15, 1935 Monam wear. YARN AND METHOD rnonvcmo SAME William S. Nutter, Sanford, and Clifford Holdsworth, Springvale, Maine, asslgnors to Goodall Worsted Company. Sanford,-Maine, a corporation of Maine Application June a, 1933, Serial No. 014,959

' 90laims. ((1117-52) This invention relates to anew construction of yarn and to a new method of producing yarn whereb a mohair or similar fibre yarn equal or superior to yarns now in use for corresponding 5 purposes'may be produced much more rapidly and I economically than such yarns have heretofore been produced. While the yarn of this invention may beemployed for a wide varietyof purposes,

w it has marked advantages when employed as a 10 warp yarn and particularly as the pile warp in the weaving of warp pile fabrics, such, for example, as' mohair plush or velvet.

While various systems are employed for spinning yam from cotton fibres and from mohair and 15, other animal fibres, there are well-known and markedly distinctive diflerences between the systems employed particularly in the cost and speed e of operation as between the cotton spinning systems and the systems for spinning mohair and 20 animal fibres dueprimarily'to the characteristic diflerences in the fibres themselves.

Cotton fibres are relatively short and hence it is impossible in the spinning operation to give the relatively long draft and tight twist characterizing the spinning of mohair and similar fibres as by the Bradford or worsted systems. In cotton spinning, the required tightness and twist is obtained both by the twist imparted in the spinning of-the single yarn and by the doubling and twisting of yarns of single count into ply yarns. But owing to the nature of the fibre, the spinning operations are performed far more rapidly and economically than in the case of the spinningv operations in the spinning of mohair and other animal fibres.

, In the spinning of mohair yarn by the systems heretofore employed, the finer the count'to' which the yarn is spun, ,the less is the proportion ofthe fleece which can be utilizedand a point is reached at which the proportion of the fleece wasted becomes so great that the cost of the yarn becomesexcessive. J 7

One of the objects of the present invention is to utilize in the spinningof mohair yarn in part the principles heretofore employed in the spinning of cotton yarn, thus greatly increasing the rapidity with which the yarn may be produced and greatly reducing the cost of manufacture.-

In this invention the yarn .ispartially produced I by a spinning operation involving the principles of cotton spinning and partially by a spinning operation involving the principles of the mohair or worsted spinning systems heretofore employed and with the entire elimination of the separate twisting operation heretofore employed with, the

result that the yarn produced isof the nature of a single yarn but of the'count of a corresponding ply yarn, of ample strength forthe required purposes,

and of distinctive and superior characteristics as hereinafter set forth.

The drawing illustrates conventionally the yarn and certain steps in the method of its production.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of the single yam strand.

Fig 2 is a perspective view of the strand of mohair roving,

Fig. 3 is a perspective'view of the finished yarn,

It will be understood that it is impossible in a drawing to show the exact proportions, dimensions of the yarn and its component parts and the exact arrangement, proportions and dimensions of the fibres in the yarn. The drawing therefore only serves to illustratein a general way the construction and is entirely of a conventional nature.

In carrying out the invention, the minimum amount of cotton fibre is introduced that is necessary to enablethe yarn to be produced partly by the cotton spinning methods and hence far more rapidly and economically than heretofore. Moreover, the cotton fibre content is so located in the finished yarn as not materially to detract from its appearance, feel and other characteristics as compared with the mohair yarn spun by the usual. processes.

In carrying out the invention, a single yarn strand represented byF'ig. 1 is first spun on the regular cotton system from a roving composed of a mixture of cotton fibres and mohair I posed of substantially equal parts of cotton and mohair fibres. In the broader aspect of the invention the non-cotton content may be composed partially of wool orvother animal fibre but when .then'nohair is thus mixed with such other fibre,

the primary consideration is one of fibre cost.

In the production'of this single yarn strand, the mohair fibres should first be cut to substantially the same length as the stapleof the cotton fibres employed. This strand is spun not only rapidly and economically, due to the use of the methods employed incotton spinning, but this strand utiliz 2s a maximum amount of the mohair fleece because of the relatively short fibre length necessary to mix with the cotton fibre.

In carrying out the invention, the single yarn strand thus spun is next doubled with a strand of mohair roving represented by Fig. 2 and then The results are that the twist given by the spinning operation is imparted partially to the roving strand and that this strand is wrapped around tion of fine wo'ol fibre. Itwill be recognized that' and caused to envelop the singleyarn strand in helical form. The mohair roving strand when it enters this spinning operation has, of course, only a very slight twist or only that necessary to hold the fibres together and consequently a very-substantially less twist than in the single yarn strand. At the conclusion of the spinning operation, the mohair strand therefore envelops the single yarn strand in a helix of less turns per unit length than there are in the twist of the other strand.

The finished yarn represented by Fig. 3 has the appearance, feel and characteristics of a single mohair yarn with a minor proportion of cotton fibre lying at the center.

In the production of the yarn, the weight per unit length of the two strands: employed is preferably the same.

The roving strand in certain forms of ,the invention may be a mixture of mohair and other suitable animal fibre. But in thiscase a further and important subsidiary feature of the invention resides in that this roving strand is'preferably composed of a mixture in which there is a major proportion of mohair fibre and a minor proporin the finished yarn of this invention there is very much less total twistinthe yarn and its component strands as compared with a two-ply mohair yarn spun by the methods heretofore employed and that particularly there is much less twist in the enveloping strand imparted thereto by the final spinning operation employed herein than in either component single yarn of a corresponding two-ply mohair yarn spun by the prethus employed to secure this result is readily determined depending upon the particular character of the two fibres employed and the extent to which smoothness in the finished yarn is required.

It will be recognized that with this invention 7 there has been no separate twisting operation employed and that the yarn has been produced entirely by spinning operations. Thus the entire expense of twisting machinery with the cost and time required for the twisting operation is eliminated. I

Furthermore, it will be recognized that the enveloping rovingstrand may be spun down to a fine count with a minimum wastage of the mohair content because of the way in which it is spun in this invention. If, for example, :this strand were spun "as a single yarn on the worsted system or the methods hereofore employed, it

could only be spun to about half the count that 1 it can be spun as a strand of the yarn of this invention and still utilize without wastage the same proportion of the mohair fleece. Putting it concretely, if the enveloping roving strand be spun as a single yarn on the worsted system to, 1

say, a 16-count, only that portion of the mohair fleece could be utilized without wastage which would be utilized by spirming the same strand to a 32-count as a part of the yarn of this invention.

While, as noted, the yarn of this invention may be used for a wide variety of purposes, it hasof the pile. Consequently there is an essential,

impairment of the desired smooth velvety appearance. With the yarn embodying the present invention employed in the manufacture of similar goods, when the pile loopsgare cut, the

twist, which, as heretofore pointed out, is very much less than in the previous case, is practically entirely released down to the bottom of the pile so that a remarkably smooth velvety appearance is imparted to the pile fabric. In fact it is found in practice possible to weave the fabric with a lower pile and consequently with "the utilization of a lesser amount of yarn indhe case of yarn made in accordance with the present invention as compared with the yarns made by previous methods and to obtain superior resuits.

Again it will be noted thatin the yarn of the" present invention the cotton content is introduced only to enable the utilization of the cotton spinning methods with the consequent great reduction in time and cost of manufacture. This cotton content lies at the center of the yarn and does not materiallyafiect the appearance, feel and characteristics of the yarn as compared with a yarn containing no cotton content. This-is particularly noticeable in the case of the pile fabrics referred to because when the pile loops are cut, the ends of the cut pile are practically entirely of mohair fibre. Due to the greater resiliency or spring of the mohair fibre, these fibres stand far above the cotton fibres which retract.

practically to the base of thepile. Hence in such a cut pile fabric woven with the yarn of this in= vention, the appearance, feel and characteristics of the fabric are practically the same as those of an all-mohair out pile fabric and in addition a lesser amount of the yarn is required and the appearance of the fabric is markedly enhanced by reason of'the practically the twist in the pile. v

Having thus described the invention. what is complete release of 1. The method of forming yarn which consistsin forming a mixture of cotton and animal fibres in which the animal fibres are wholly or partially mohair and in which the maximum length of all the fibres is the maximum length of the cotton fibres, forming a roving from the said mixture, spinning a single yarn strand in the way in which cotton yarn is spun from the said roving, forming a roving of animal fibres inwhich the animal fibres are wholly or partially of mohair, and in which the average length of the fibres is essentially greater than the average length of the fibres in the first roving, doubling with the spun single yarn strand the second strand of roving, and spinning together the two strands without drafting the spun single yarn strand while drafting the second roving strand to cause the latter to envelop the former.

2. A yarn composed of a twisted core strand of a mixture of cotton and animal fibres in which the animal fibres are wholly or partially mohair, and in which the maximum length of all the fibres is the maximum length of the cotton fibres, and a twisted enveloping strand of animal fibres in which the animal fibres are Wholly or partially of mohair and in which the average length of the fibres is essentially greater than the average length of the fibres in the core strand, the enveloping strand having a markedly less twist than the core strand and enveloping the core strand in a helix of less turns per unit length than in thetwist of the core strand.

3. A yarn composed of a twisted core strand of a mixture of substantially equal amounts of cotton and animal fibres in which the animal fibres are wholly or partially mohair, and in which the maximum length of all the fibres is the maximum length of the cotton fibres, and a twisted enveloping strand of animal fibres in which the animal fibres are wholly or partially of mohair and in which the average length of the fibres is essentially greater than the average length of the fibres in the core strand, the enveloping strand having a markedly less twist than the core strand and enveloping the core strand in a helix of less turns per unit length than in the twist of the core strand.

4. A yarn composed of a twisted core strand of a mixture of cotton and animal fibres in which the animal fibres are wholly or partially mohair, and in which the maximum length of all the fibres is the maximum length of the cotton fibres, and a twisted enveloping strand of a mixture of mohair fibres and fine wool fibres, in which the wool fibres constitute the minor component and in which the average length of the mohair fibres is essentially greater than the average length of the fibres in the core strand, the enveloping strand having a markedly less twist than the core strand and enveloping the core strand in a helix of less turns per unit length than in the twist of the core strand and with the wool fibres enwrapping and holding in the enveloping strand the bulk of the ends of the mohair fibres of the said strand.

5. A yarn composed of a twisted core strand of a mixture of substantially equal amounts of cotton and animal fibres in which the animal fibres are wholly or partially mohair, and in which the maximum length of all the fibres is the maximum length of the cotton fibres, and a twisted enveloping strand of a mixture of mohair fibres and fine wool fibres, in which the wool fibres constitute the minor component and in which the average length of themohair fibres is essentially greater than the average length of the fibres in the core strand, the enveloping strand having a markedly less twist than the core strand and enveloping the core strand in a helix of less turns per unit length than in the twist of the core strand and with the wool fibres enwrapping and holding in the enveloping strand the bulk of the ends of the mohair fibres of the said strand.

6. A yarn composed of a spun strand of a mixture of substantially equal amounts of cotton and animal fibres in which the animal fibres are wholly or partially mohair and in which the maximum length of all the fibres in the core strand is the maximum length of the cotton fibres, and an enveloping strand of roving of animal fibres in which the animal fibres are wholly or partially mohair and in which the average length of the fibres in the enveloping strand is essentially greater than the average length of the fibres in the core strand, the core strand lying in an unextended condition in the yarn and the enveloping strand lying in a slightly twisted condition and in a helix about the core strand.

7. A yarn composed of a twisted core strand of a mixture of substantially 50% of cotton fibres and 50% mohair or mohair and wool fibres and in which the maximum length of all the fibres is the maximum length of the cotton fibres, and a twisted enveloping strand of mohair fibres having an average length essentially greater than the average length of the fibres in the core strand, the enveloping strand having a markedly less t'wist than the core strand'and enveloping the core strand in a helix of less turns per unit length than in the twist of the core strand.

8. A yarn composed of a twisted core strand of a mixture of substantially 50% of cotton fibres and 50% mohair or mohair and wool fibres and in which the maximum length of all the fibres is the maximum length of the cotton fibres, and a twisted enveloping strand of a mixture of mohair fibres and fine wool fibres, in which the wool fibres constitute the minor component and in which the average length of the mohair fibres is essentially greater than the average length of the fibres in the core strand, the enveloping strand having a markedly less twist than the core strand andienveloping the core strand in a helix of less turns per unit length than in the twist of the core strand and with the wool fibres enwrapping and holding in the enveloping strand the bulk of the ends of the mohair fibres of the said strand.

9. A yarn composed of a twisted core strand of a mixture of substantially equal amounts of cotton fibres and mohair fibres in which the cotton and mohair fibres are of substantially the same length, and a twisted enveloping strand of a mixture of mohair fibres and fine wool fibres, in which the wool fibres constitute the minor component andin which the average length of the mohair fibres is essentially greater than the average length of the fibres in the core strand, the enveloping strand having a markedly less twist than the core strand and enveloping the core strand in a helix of less turns per unit length than in the twist of the core strand and with the wool fibres enwrapping and holding in the enveloping strand the bulk of the ends of the mohair fibres of the said strand.

WILLIAM S. NU'I'IER. CLIFFORD HOLDSWORTH,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2571077 *Feb 11, 1949Oct 9, 1951Mohawk Carpet Mills IncPile fabric
US2571087 *Apr 5, 1950Oct 9, 1951Mohawk Carpet Mills IncPile fabric
US2746236 *May 16, 1951May 22, 1956Georg KufnerProcess for the manufacture of threads
US2950591 *Nov 7, 1958Aug 30, 1960Neely Mfg CompanyProduction of yarn containing hair fibers
US4183202 *Oct 7, 1976Jan 15, 1980Murata Kikai Kabushiki KaishaMethod and apparatus for producing spun yarn
US5477815 *Jun 1, 1993Dec 26, 1995Booda Products, Inc.Dog chew toy
US6330786 *Sep 10, 1999Dec 18, 2001Great Plains Buffalo Products, Inc.Buffalo hair yarn and fabric and method of making buffalo hair yarn and fabric
USRE31705 *Jan 15, 1982Oct 16, 1984Murata Kikai Kabushiki KaishaMethod and apparatus for producing spun yarn
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/210, 57/252, 19/145
International ClassificationD02G3/28, D02G3/26
Cooperative ClassificationD02G3/28, D10B2201/02, D10B2211/02
European ClassificationD02G3/28