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Publication numberUS1988043 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1935
Filing dateAug 13, 1934
Priority dateAug 13, 1934
Publication numberUS 1988043 A, US 1988043A, US-A-1988043, US1988043 A, US1988043A
InventorsLard Allan E
Original AssigneeLard Allan E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club
US 1988043 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 15, 1935. A. E. LARD A GOLF CLUB Filed Aug. 15, 1934 Patented Jan. 15, 1935 l UNITED sTArEs GOLF CLUB Allan E. Lard, Washington, D. C.

Application August 13,

3 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in the heads of golf club irons, but is shown only in the head of the midiron type.

upon impact of the blade with the ball. The principal object of this invention is to eliminate this unpleasant feature, thus improving the feel of the shot and the pleasure of thevgame, and, at the same time, retaining the lofting advantage of said irons.

I have found that this objectionable feel is due partly to the impact of the ball with the hard steel blade, and partly to the metallic socket of the steel neck.

The sole of the blade of an iron club cannot be broad as in the wood heads of the brassie and spoon, for reasons hereafter explained. In the brassie and spoon, the shafts are longer and the swing is flatter than in the iron clubs. In the brassie the broad sole, if it impacts with the turf, is deflected by the same and slides along cutting through the grass. In an iron 'club the sole is narrow and the shaft shorter, the stance closer to the ball and the swing more upright, and a divot is taken with every shot properly executed. The upright swing4 and the divot stroke cause the ball to rise quickly and go high. A divot cannot be taken with a broad soled brassie in the manner in which it can with a narrow soled iron club, and it is therefore clear that in order to get a quick rising shot a narrow sole must be provided.

In this invention, I provide a sole of approximately the same breadth as the present iron heads (approximately 1/"), thus retaining the desirable features of high shots to the green, and atthe same time providing a non-metallic blade and neck which effectively eliminate the unpleasant feel of the steel shafted irons of today. The head likewise is of the proper weight, properly distributed.

Other objects of the invention and the invention itself Will become increasingly apparent from a consideration of the following description and drawing, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of my improved head of the midiron type, with a portion of the neck or hosel broken away and with a portion of the shaft secured thereto;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view of the head illustrated in Fig. 1, showing the loft of the face of the blade 11;

Fig. 3 is a bottom plan view of the head of Fig. 1, the neck being broken off;

Golf club irons, when steel-shafted, frequently sting the fingers 1934, serial No, '139,603`

Fig. 4 is a section taken alon'g the lines 4-4 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a side elevational view illustrating a reinforced neck, the blade being broken oil for clearness.

Referring now to the drawing, I have indicated generally at 10 my improved head of the midiron type, with integral blade 11 and neck 20 formed of composition material, preferably com posed of molded mutilated fabric, such as can- 10 vas, bakelite, and any suitable binder of elastic water-proof cement. I may, however, employ any of the well known materials, such as Textolite, or Formica, or any suitable non-metallic material. y

The blade face, that is, the striking face, indicated at 11, Fig. 2, 'is generally the same shape as the modern form of midirons, shown in Fig. 1, but the blade itself is approximately 5/8" thick throughout, and this is comparatively narrow 20 with respect to a brassie or spoon but provides suiicient non-metallic material integral with the neck when reinforced as at 25, Fig. 5 1

Although I have illustrated in Figs. 1 to 4 inclusive a blade of uniform thickness, it is under- 25 stood that a blade of uniform thickness is also applicable to the other non-metallic heads to be employed in the place of iron heads now in use. I may, however, have the blade somewhat thicker at the upper surface. l

A lead weight indicated atl 16 is seated preferably ln cement in a slot 17 molded ory milled in the blade. A sole plate 18 is now screwed to the sole of the 4blade and retains the lead weight immovably in its position, the cement causing a 35 tight t. This lead weight, in conjunction with the sole plate and nonmetallic head, gives the head the desired weight. To secure the steel shaft 19 in the socket 20, I preferably anchor the same with a screw as at 21; the usual grip 40 being applied at the upper or gripping end of the shaft. The thickness of the composition face 11 of the bladeforwardly of the lead plate is approximately the lead plate is approxi'- mately 1% thick and substantially the same size '45 and shape as the face of the blade, and the wall of the'blade rearwardly of the lead plate indicated at 23 is approximately 1/8 thick, making the total breadth or lthickness of the blade approximately as stated. T'he sole plate is 50 flat for 1/2" as shown in Fig. 4; it then curves upwardly as shown at 22 thereby permitting the lower portion of the face of the vblade to get under the ball as the swing starts up.

In the event that a very heavy composition is employed, the lead weight may be omitted. For strength I may have two weights separated by a partition between the two walls. l

I have thoroughly tted a 141/2 ounce midiron made in accordance with Figs. 1 to 4 and the specification stated and this new club unquestionably gives a sweeter feeling ball, and a Y longer ball than the ordinary modern steelshafted midiron club tested under the same conditions and with the same balls.

The other types of heads (not shown) having a greater or less loft to the faces than the midiron, Figs. 1 to 4 inclusive, practically duplicate the midiron with a`small difference in weight. The mashie type blades are somewhat deeper than the midiron, and the angle of the sole more acute with respect to the face.

Although I have shown and described embodi- -ments of my invention, I contemplate that nuwhich is characteristic of the well-known ordi-- nary irons heads and having the usual lofted strikingA face, said restricted width of sole in conjunction with said lofted face whenv taking an upright turf-taking swing, operative to effect a lofted trajectory to the struck ball, and a metal weight forming a part ofthe blade having a forwardly presented surface conforming nearly inextent to and being generally of the outline of the striking surface of the blade, said weight having a forward face disposed rearwardly of and substantially spaced from said striking surface and arranged substantially in parallel relation thereto, the total weight of said head approximating that of correspondingly lofted heads of the usual irons type, and a durable protective turf-cutting metal sole plate secured on the bottom surface of the blade.

2. A head for golf clubs of the well-known irons type comprising a body of non-metallic material consisting of 'a tubular shaft-receiving hosel and a blade portion, said blade portion having a sole substantially of such restricted width which is characteristic of the well-known ordinary irons heads and having the usual lofted striking face, said restricted width of sole in conjunction with said lofted face when taking an upright turf-taking swing, operative to eiect a lofted trajectory to the struck ball, and a metal weight forming a part of the blade generally of the outline of the striking surface of the blade, said weight having a forward face disposed rearwardly of and substantially spaced from said striking surface and arranged substantially in parallel relation thereto, the total weight of said head approximating that of correspondingly lofted heads of the usual irons type,

and a durable protective turf-cutting metal sole plate secured on the bottom surface of the blade.

3. The head for golf clubs substantially as set forth in the preceding claim characterized by said non-metallic body having its blade portion recessed, said recess containing at least a portion of said weight.

ALLAN E. LARD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2534947 *Dec 31, 1946Dec 19, 1950Elvin M BrightGolf club head
US3704891 *Feb 20, 1970Dec 5, 1972Chiarelli Ronald LPuck for ice hockey
US4027885 *Jul 19, 1976Jun 7, 1977Rogers Kenneth AGolf iron manufacture
US4699383 *Mar 18, 1986Oct 13, 1987Maruman Golf Co., Ltd.Club-head
US4708347 *Apr 22, 1986Nov 24, 1987Maruman Co., Ltd.Club-head
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/338
International ClassificationA63B53/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/04
European ClassificationA63B53/04