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Publication numberUS1988281 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1935
Filing dateMay 15, 1933
Priority dateMay 15, 1933
Publication numberUS 1988281 A, US 1988281A, US-A-1988281, US1988281 A, US1988281A
InventorsMaccarone Fred
Original AssigneeMaccarone Fred
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe making method
US 1988281 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 1'5, 1935. F. MAccARoNE 1,988,231

sHoE MAKING METHOD- y AFiled May 15P 1935 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR ATTORNEY Patented Jan. 15, 1.935

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 5Claims.

.My invention relates to shoe making 'and a principal object of my invention is to provide an improved and simplified method of making shoes of the type originally taught in my United ,5 States Patent No. 1,569,823, wherein an insole, to which the upper is afxed, includes an integral heel portion, a shank portion and a ball portion having a central opening therein dening a continuous marginal rand extending from the front of one side of the shank around the toe and to the front of the opposite side of the shank to afford means for initially alxing the .upper to the insole, land an outsole is provided having a marginal depression conforming to the rand for receiving the same with the upper attached thereto, whereby the central portion of the inner face of the outsole is disposed flush with the upper surface of the rand. g

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of the female portion of a die employed to centrally depress the ball portion of the rounded sole which is shown lying thereon.

Figure 2 is a cross sectional view taken on 25 lines 2-'2 of Figure 1 and illustrates, on a larger scale, the ball portion of the sole depressed between the male and female die portions.

.Figure 3 is a longitudinal sectional view illustrating the method by which the rounded sole is split to provide the complementaryV outsole and insole portions.

Figure 4 is a longitudinal section thru the insole portion.

Figure 5 is a longitudinal section thru the outsole portion.

Figure 6 is a longitudinal section thru the backing piece employed to support and reinforce the sole during the splitting operation illustrated in Figure 3.

Figure 7 is an inverted plan view of the insole with the upper lasted and secured thereto.

- Figure 8 is a longitudinal sectiontaken thru the insole and portions of the attached upper.

VFigure 9 is a longitudinal section illustrating the ball tread portion vo1! the shoe with the outsole assembled thereto, and

Figure 10 is a side elevation of a completed shoe, shown partly in section to reveal the nished relationship of the sole portions.

In carrying out my present invention I rst provide a full rounded sole 30 and then inex or depress-the central ball tread portion thereof a distance somewhatgreater than the thickness of an insole .to be removed therefrom; This I accomplish by pressing the sole between the male and female elements, 33 and 34 respectively, of a swage or pressing die, as illustrated in Figure '7.

After removal from the pressing die, the sole Ais reenforced by a perforate backing strip 36 (see Figure' 6), which is formed to complement the depressed portion of the sole and-is lpreferably made of a durable and somewhat exible compoo sition material. then passed between the rollers 37-37- of a conventional leather splitting machine, the splitting blade 38 of which is positioned to cut above the bottom of the depressed area 35, so that when the sole has been split its full length, an insole portion 39, perforate centrally of its ball tread portion, and an outsole portion 40, is provided. The insole 39, formed as above and trimmed to; proper size, comprises an integral heel portion, a shank portion-and a ball portion, the said ball portion having a central opening therein defining a continuous marginal rand 39l extending from the front of one side of the shank around the toe,

The sole thus backed up, is 1 and tothe front of the opposite side vof the The insole 39 is next lasted to the upper .42 of" the shoe to which it is secured by any of such special adhesives as are `well-known in this art, or by other suitable means, preliminary to which `a patch. 43 may be removably pasted to cover the perforate portion of the insole. /J

The outsole 40 is then placed inposition over the lasted insole and the depressed portion.35 thereof is forced back intoits original normal condition, as illustrated in Figure 9. In this manner a marginal depression 40' is dened on th'e inner side of the outsole which conforms to the rand 39 and receivesthe same with the upper attached thereto, whereby the central portion posed flush with the upper surface' of the rand.

The remaining steps necessary-to'complete the. shoe are the usual ones consisting in removing 35 of the inner face of the outsole is dis- 40 the patch 43, assembling the sole lining and 45 other outsole from` which a similarV insole has.,

l been split.

A the foregoing considered merely illustrative of my invention as dened in the here appended claims: f

I claim:

1. In shoe 'making methods, that improvement which includes rounding va full sole from suitable material and depressing a central area of the ball portion thereof, then splitting the sole above the depressed'area to obtain an insole therefrom, lasting a shoe upper to the insole in secured relation, replacing the sole in its original relation to the insole and restoring it to its normal undepressed condition; theout,sole thus provided having a ball portion centrally elevated in thickness andthe insole thus'obtained having an opening in the ball portion thereof to receive the elevated portion of the outsole.

2. In shoe makingmethods, that improvement which'includes rounding a full sole from suitable material; temporarily depressing a central area' of the ball portion thereof; then, while the sole is thus depressed, continuously splitting the sole above the depressed area toI obtain a perforate insole therefrom; lasting a shoe upper to the in- I sole in securedJelation, and replacing said sole l vin its original relation to the insole and securing v it thereto.

' blank from vsuitable material; temporarily depressing the blank'over a central area of the ball portion thereof; then, while the blank is thus depressed, f continuously splitting the blank above the depressed area to remove therefrom a full insole having an opening therein defining a continuous marginal rand, said rand extending from the iront of'one side of the shank around the toe to the front of the opposite side of the shank vancl aii'ording means for ,amxing an up'per to the insole, and the Aremaining 'part of said blank comprising an outsole unreduced in thickness over an areacomplemental to the opening in the insole. 4

4. In shoe making methods, that improvement which includes roundingl a full sole from suitable material and depressing a central area of the ball portion thereof, then splitting the soleabove the depressed area to. obtain a perforate insole therefrom, lasting a shoe upper to the insole in secured relation, replacing the sole inits original relation to theinsole and securing it thereto, and restoring the sole to its normal undepressed condition.

5. In shoe making methods, that improvement which. includes rounding a full sole from vsuitable material; temporarily depressing `a central area of the ball portion thereof; then, while the sole is thus depressed; continuously splitting the sole above the depressed area to provide an outsole having a ball portion centrally elevated in thickness and an insole having an opening in the ball portion'thereof complemental to said outsole elevation; lasting a shoe upper to the insole in secured relation; and securing an outsole thus formed to said insole and to the overlasted portions of the upper.

FRED MACCARONE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3042948 *Jun 28, 1960Jul 10, 1962Goodyear Tire & RubberOutsole and method of manufacture
US8393028 *Apr 23, 2009Mar 12, 2013Nike, Inc.Method of manufacturing footwear having sipes
US20100269271 *Apr 23, 2009Oct 28, 2010Namkook KimMethod of Manufacturing Footwear Having Sipes
Classifications
U.S. Classification12/146.0BP, 36/22.00R
International ClassificationA43B13/16, A43B13/12
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/16, A43B13/12, A43B13/141
European ClassificationA43B13/14F, A43B13/12, A43B13/16