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Publication numberUS1988617 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 22, 1935
Filing dateMay 4, 1931
Publication numberUS 1988617 A, US 1988617A, US-A-1988617, US1988617 A, US1988617A
InventorsHarold C. Adams
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Volatile deodorant heater
US 1988617 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. z2, 1935. H C, ADAMS' 1,988,617

VOLAT ILE DEODORANT HEATER Original Filed May 4, 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet l I lf/ I l l le o "I u l Ill 4 4 /6 INV NTOR Hamm minding? 'F715 fj ATTORNEYS Jan. 22, 1935. H. c. ADAMS VOLATILE DEODORANT HEATER Original Filed May 4, 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 f cwcggd Qlilg Patented Jan. 22, 1935 PATENT OFFICE v voLATILE DEoDoaANT HEATER Harold c. Adams, seattle, wash.

Applieation May 4, 1931, serialv No. 534,752 Renewed June 9, 1934 8 Claims.

vMy present invention relates to the art of deodorant devices and more particularly to a. Volatile deodorant heater.

It has been quite common practice to burn incense, perfume and other volatile deodorants in order to overcome unwanted odors. When used in this manner, however, usually an excess of the deodorant is given off and then there will be long periods before the average housewife feels that she can economically burn more of the deodorant. In my present device I provide means whereby the heat of an incandescent Vlamp may be employed to gradually vaporize a deodorant such as cake or powder incense or perfume in either powder or liquid form. Therefore:

The principal object of my invention is to provide convenient means for placing and holding a deodorant in close contact with an incandescent lamp.

A further object is the provision of means whereby powdered deodorants may be used in the manner indicated. k

A still further object is to provide means whereby liquid deodorants or perfumes may be slowly vaporized.

i Other'and more specific objects will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a side elevation of an incandescent light with my device secured thereto.`

Figure `2 is a sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of Figure -1.

, Figure 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of Figure 2. Y

Figure 4 is a cross sectional view taken along the line`44 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is an exploded perspective view showin g the lvarious parts making up my device.

Figure 6 is asectional view similar to Figure 2, showing the means employed for using liquid deodorants.

Figure 7 is a vertical cross sectional view through one of the more popular screen lamps showing my device in use with an inverted light globe.

Referring to the drawings, throughout which like reference characters indicate like parts, numeral 10 designates the main body portion or receptacle of my device. This I prefer to form by pressing it out of sheet metal, of relatively high heat conductivity, such as copper, for instance. To more easily form a close contact with the light globe, G, I prefer to curve the inner contacting surface as 12 and further, in order to permit free circulation of air through the device to the end that the vaporized deodorant will be carried away, I provide a plurality of openings 14. On opposite sides of member 10 I prefer to form, sometimes as part of the material removed from the central openings, the supporting lugs 16. Adapted to pivotably engage lugs 16 are two spring members 18 and 20. I have found it most convenient to have this point of attachment disposed near the center, longitudinally, of body 10 after the showing of Figure 2. In this way the springs 18 and 20, by exerting inward pressure, can cause both ends of body 10 to t snugly against the light globe, G. It will be apparent, I believe, that a single centrally disposed resilient member might be used to support the body but it has been found that two members as shown form a more rugged mountlng.

The springs 18 and 20 are secured, by convenient means, to a non-inflammable, nonconductor supporting ring 22. This ring I prefer to form with a conical counterbore 24 so that it may more easily engage the base of the light globe. I have further found it desirable to employ two resilient members as springs 26 and 28 to counterbalance the inward pressure of springs 18 and and thus tend to bring ring 22 to an even bearing. I believe it will be apparent that with the springs equally spaced about ring 20 and subject to any reasonable deflection, that one such unit as I have described can be used on any shaped light globe normally used in a home.

Disposed within body l0 is a screen member 30. This member need not necessarily be used when cake incense as 32 is used. However, even this material disintegrates after continued heating and the wire screen prevents its sifting out through the openings 14. The chief purpose, however, of screen 30 is to accommodate incense, sachet, and perfume in powdered form.

Adapted to engage body 10 is a cover member 34. This may be secured to body 10 in any desirable manner. However, I have found it very convenient to use one or more lugs as 36 which are adapted to engage the opening 14 and to have further, a spring lug member 38 which is adapted to engage one or more openings 14 on the opposite end of body 10. This member should preferably be provided with a linger engaging lip as 40. This makes the removal of the cover very convenient.

There are times when it is desirable to use liquid perfumes or deodorants. This is accomplished by employing a pad as 42 made of suitable brous material. Asbestos matting has been found very satisfactory. In this case it is only necessary to soak the mat in the liquid deodorant or perfume, or more particularly in the case of perfumes, to place a drop or two on the mat and then place it Within body l0, secure it in place by cover 34 and allow the heat of the globe to vaporize the deodorant. The plurality of openings 14 permit the vapor to escape and convectional currents created by `the' heated light globe carry the vapor away vand. allow the entrance of fresh air, through openings 14, for treatment. Y

The foregoing description and the accompanying drawings are believed to clearly disclose a preferred embodiment of my invention but it will be understood that this disclosure is merely illustrative and that such changes in the invention may be made as fairly within the scope and spirit of the following claims.

What I claim is:

- 1.' .Aldeodorant heater consisting of means including a receptacle having one side curved to fit an electric light globe; and a plurality of openings therein; means including a cover member adapted to `enclose 'said receptacle; lugs secured to said coverfmemher adapted to engage the openings infthe receptacle and hold the cover in position; a screen lining for said receptacle; means including. a supporting ring having .a conical counterbore adapted to iit around the base of an electric light; means including springs adapted to connect said receptacle and said ring and urge the receptacle against a light globe; and additional springs `oppositely disposed substantially parallel to .the axis of the light globe ina manner to counterbalance the receptacle supporting springs and adapted to hold said ring normal to the axis of a light globe.

'2; A deodorant heater consisting of means including a receptacle having one side `curved to flt an electric light globe, and a plurality of openings therein; means including a cover member adapted to enclose said receptacle; lugs secured to said cover member adapted to engage the openings in the receptacle and hold the cover in position; a screen lining for said receptacle; means including a supporting ring having a conical counterbore adapted to t around the base of an electric light; and including resilient means adapted to connect said receptacle and said ring, in a manner to support and position said receptacle.

3. Adeodorant heaterconsisting of means including a receptacle having one side curved to fit an electric light globe and a plurality of openings therein; means including a cover member adapted to enclose said receptacle; lugs secured to said covermember adapted to engage the openings in the receptacle and hold the cover in position;

means including a supporting ring having a conical counterbore adapted to fit around the base of an electric light; and including resilient means adapted to connect said receptacle and said ring, in a manner to support and position said receptacle.

4. A deodorant heater consisting of means including a receptacle having one side curved to t an electric light globe; means' including a cover member .adapted to enclose said receptacle; a screen lining for said receptacle; means including ;a supporting ring having a conical counterbore adapted to fit around the base of an electric light; and `including lresilient means adapted to connect y saidjreceptacle and said ring, in a manner to support andrposition said receptacle.

SLA deodorant heater consisting of means including 4a receptacle adapted to fit against an -electriclight globe; means including a cover member adapted to enclose said receptacle; means including a non-inflammable supporting ring kadapted to iit around the base of an electric light; and including resilient means adapted `to connect said receptacle and said ring in a manner to support and position said receptacle. Y 6` A deodorant heater consisting of means including a receptacle having one side curved to fit an electric light globe; means including a cover member adapted to enclose said receptacle; means including a supporting ring having a conical counterbore adapted to fit around the base of an electric light; and including resilient means adapted to connect said receptacle and said ring in a manner to support and position said receptacle.

7. A deodorant heater consisting of means including a receptacle adapted to t an electric light globe; means including a cover member adapted to enclose said receptacle; means includ? ing a screen lining for said body; means including a supporting ring adapted to fit around the base of an electric light; and including resilient means adapted to connect said receptacle and said ring, in a manner to support and position said receptacle. y

8. A deodorant heater consisting of means including areceptacle adaptedfto fit an electric light globe, and a plurality of openings therein; means including a cover member adapted to enclose said receptacle; lugs secured to said cover member adapted to engage the openings in the receptacle and hold the cover in position; a screen lining for said body; means including a support,- ing ring adapted to t around thebase ofan elec tric light; Vand resilient means adapted to connect said body portion and said ring in a manner to support and position said receptaclaY f HAROLD C. ADAMS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2468164 *Apr 5, 1946Apr 26, 1949Brewster Gordon LVaporizer device
US2535802 *May 22, 1948Dec 26, 1950 Libson
US2714649 *Nov 25, 1952Aug 2, 1955Critzer Lyle HVaporizer
US2733333 *Jun 30, 1952Jan 31, 1956 peters
US2742342 *Jun 10, 1952Apr 17, 1956Dew John NMethod of and apparatus for vaporization of sublimate solids
US3119650 *Sep 14, 1960Jan 28, 1964Aladdin Mfg CompanyDevice for propagation of scent for attracting wild game
US6035098 *Jul 20, 1999Mar 7, 2000Osram Sylvania Inc.Scent lamp
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/125, 392/395, 392/393
Cooperative ClassificationA61L9/03