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Publication numberUS1989145 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 29, 1935
Filing dateOct 6, 1933
Priority dateOct 6, 1933
Publication numberUS 1989145 A, US 1989145A, US-A-1989145, US1989145 A, US1989145A
InventorsNewby Neal D
Original AssigneeNewby Neal D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cap for collapsible tubes
US 1989145 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 29, 1935. N. D, NEWBY CAP FOR COLLAPSIBLE TUBES Filed Oct. 6, 1933 INVENTOR NEAL D. NEWB) ATTORNEYS Patented Jan. 29,1935

1 UNITED STATES :PATE

NT OFFICE a This invention relates to closures for nozzles, especially of tubes for powder or paste, on the necks of bottles, and the like.

An object of the invention is to provide a clof sure of novel construction for permanent attachment to the nozzle, and one which whileinexpensive may be quickly manipulated for eflicient dispensation of the container contents.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment the invention comprisesan elastic cap of inverted frusto-conical contour having a cylindrical bore penetrating into the interior from the tapered end thereof and terminating within the cap below In order to assure a liquid tight closure of the lips the slits may be formed to penetrate sinuous fashion to the bore. With the same object in view the rim of the cap may incorporate a perlpherally extending non-extensible medium, such as thread or wire, adapted to draw the rim radially toward the center. Or again the rim of the cap may have integraltherewith a suspended flange adapted to be flexed upwardly about the rim'proper for providingv additional compression of the lips when closed. 4

Referring now to the drawing: "Fig. 1 shows in perspective a cap in accordance with the present invention aflixed to the nozzle of a collapsible tube. In the figure the cap is closed.

Fig. 2 is a sectional elevation along 2 of-Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view corresponding to Fig. 1 but with the cap flexed open to expose the nozzle.

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the Fig. 3 showing; and Fig. 5 a sectional elevational view along 5-5 of Fig. 4.

' Figs. 6 and '7 are sectional elevations of a modiflcation wherein a flange depends from the rim ofthecap. Fig. 6 shows the normal position of the flange, while Fig. 7 shows the flange flexed upwardly for further compressing the lips when top to base.

modifications incorporating preferably a non-extensible. or inelastic medium in the' rim ofthe cap. Fig.9 additionally depicts the slits penetrating-sinuously to the bore to assure a'liquid tight joint; These figures also show various ways of .aflixing the cap to the nozzle. r

Figs. 11-14 inclusive are plan views suggestive of the many patternsin which the cap may be formed and slit. 4

Referring more particularly to Figs. 1-5 inclusive, the cap 1 comprises a single piece of homo-' geneous elastic material, tapering externally from A bore 2 penetrates into the cap from the tapered end or base thereof and terminates below the top, the-bore being such as to assure snug engagement between the cap and the associated nozzle 3 of a container 4, such as a collapsible tube. The top of the cap is provided with one or more' radially extending incisions or slits 5 which terminate short of the'rim 6, and which penetrate into the cap and communicate with the bore 2 below the upper limit of the base, as shown more clearly in Figs. 2?5 inclusive.

The cap as thus formed is characterized by having two stable positions, the closed position of fice, thereby allowing the contents of the container to be freely dispensed.

The cap, when properly constructed, is un stable in all positions intermediate those of Figs. 1 and 3. It results from this that the cap may be dexterously snapped open or closed by grasping the container and applying to the rim 6, by means of the thumb and forefinger, a momentary pressure axially directed. This stretches the rim and compresses the body of the cap until the median position is reached. Thereafter the rim is free to contract and in so doing automatically snaps the cap into the .open or closed position as the case may be. This action results from the elastic medium of the cap whereby it seeksa condltlonof minimum stress, the stress being a maximum at the median position and a at the open 1 and closed positions.

The external taper 7 of the cap from rim to base determines to a considerable degree how the closure will function: The more gradual the taper the morethe body of the cap will be compressed as it is flexed from one stable position to the other, and hence the more positive its action in assuming one or the other positions of stability.

vAs the taper is increased toward the horizontal,

the operation of the cap becomes increasingly sluggish due to the smaller flexural stresses set up during operation.

The shape of the incisions 5 likewise influence the operation of the device, since this determines thewall thickness 8 in the regions of maximum flexure. For best operation the incision should be extended radially so that the outer edge lies substantially parallel with the taper 7 of the outer wall and at a proper depth within the cap to assure that the cap will snap in positive manner from one stable position to the other. The construction as to this is clearly shown in Figs.

6-10 inclusive. a

The cap may be formed in the closed position of Figure 1 or the open position of Figure 3. With the latter construction the design may be such that during the process of closure the walls which form the slits will contact while the rim 6 is" still under. considerable tension assuring thereby a liquid tight joint. This action is further as-. sisted by so forming the top that it will be concave as shown in Fig. 8. Modified designs providing a liquid tight cio sure of the cap are illustrated in Figs. 6-10 inclusive. In Figs. 6 and '7 the rim 6 is provided with a dependent flange 9 which when not in use assumes the position of Fig. 6. -When, however, it is desired to seal the closure, the flange 9 is flexed upwardly about the rim 6 in the manner of Fig. 7.'

Being thus stretched to greater than its normal circumference the flange 9 looks the lips 5 tightly against one another. With the flange 9 in the position of Fig. 7, it is diflicult or impossible to open the cap. In the position of Fig. 6, however, it has little effect on the operation.

Figs. 8, 9 and 10 show three modifications of the construction wherein the rim of the cap is provided with a peripherally extending inelastic medium. In the construction of Fig 8 this material may take the form of thread or wire 10 molded into the rim. In the construction of Fig. 9 the inelasticmaterial comprises a band 11, surrounding and suitably aflixed to the capl. In Fig. 10 the cap is provided with an inelastic ring 12 affixed coincident with the upper rim of the cap.

The addition of an inelastic material to the rim of the cap allows considerably more latitude in the design of the closure in that the external taper of the cap from top to base may be in- .creased consistent with satisfactory operation.

This results from the fact that while the rim of the cap is stressed when the closure is operated, it does not stretch and consequently the body of the closure is more highly compressed while the closure is being operated from one stable position to the other.

By imparting to the inelastic ring a diameter slightly less than the unflexed diameter of the cap, the upper portion of the cap in the closed position, can be maintained in continuous compression, thereby forcing the lips or walls 5 of the slits against one another in a liquid tight joint. The inclusion in this modification of the furrowed or corrugated construction of Fig. 9

provides an ideal closure for liquid containers. It is of course not necessary to achieve the results set forth in the Figs. 8-10 modifications, that the medium incorporated in the rim of the ,cap be completely inelastic. The same efl'ect maybe approximated by the use of a material "having an elasticity less than that of the cap proper.

Referring to the Figs. 6 and '7 construction, the inelastic ring construction may, if desired, be incorporated in the dependent flange 9 as indicated at 13.

Figs. 11-14 inclusive illustrate in elevation a few of the possible variations in the design of the cap. In Fig. 11 the cap is of circular contour, *with the slits 5 extending sinuously. Fig. 12 shows a triangular cap, and Fig. 13 a cap which is rectangular in contour. I In the Fig. 14 modiflcation the cap, which is elliptical in shape, contains but one slit and is provided with lugs 12 to facilitate openingand closing.

Figs. 2, 8, 9 and. 10 .show various methods of attaching the cap to the container. In the Fig. 2 construction, the bore of the cap is provided at the base with a bead 14 adapted to enter a channel 15 of the nozzle 2 to assure tight and permanent engagement. In Fig. 8 the construction is reversed in that here the nozzle is. provided with a bead 16 cooperating with a channel 17 formed at the base of the cap. In the Fig. 9 construction, the entire base of the cap fits into a channel formed about the nozzle. Attachment of this type is adaptable for use on bottles, soft metal tubes, cans or the like.

The form-of attachment shown in Fig. 10 is suitable for soft metal only. The construction is similar to Fig. 9 with the exception that the container is provided with a flange 18 which, upon insertion of the base of the cap in the channel 19, is crimp ed inwardly to tightly grip the cap.

Containers employing closures in accordance with the present invention, may be initially sealed, where desired, in a number of difierent ways well known to the art. Soft metal tubes may, for example, be sealed by forming them with a thin easily broken film of metal covering the orifice of the nozzle.

I claim:

1. A nozzle closure comprising an elastic cap tapering externally from top to base with a bore penetrating the base and terminating within the cap,,the top being partially slit transversely at least to the upper limit of the bore to provide 'lips normally compressed for closure, but flexing toa stable gaping position exposing the nozzle upon momentary application of force axially applied to the rim of said cap.

2. A nozzle closure comprising an elastic cap tapering externally from top to base with a bore penetrating the base and terminating within the cap, the bore providing snug engagement, with the nozzle, the top being partially slit transversely at least to the upper limit of the bore to provide lips normally compressed for closure, but flexing to a stable gaping position exposing the nozzle upon momentary application of force axially applied to the'rim' of said cap.

3. A nozzle closure comprising an elastic cap tapering externally from top to base with a bore penetrating the base and terminating within the cap, the topbeing partially slit transversely-to the bore and beyond to provide lips normally compressed for closure, but flexing to a stable gaping position for exposing the nozzle upon momentary application of force axially applied to the rim of said cap.

4. A nozzle closure comprising an elastic cap tapering externally from top to base with a bore penetrating the base and terminating within the 1 cap, said top being provided with radially exmentary application of force axially applied to the rim of said cap.

5. A nozzle comprising an elastic cap of inverted ii iu'sto-conical contour with a bore penetrating fliefcap from the tapered end thereo! ior snugly c: the nozzle, the top 01 said cap'being partially slit radially at least to the upper iimitof bore to provide lips normally compressed} .closure, but flexing to a stable gaping positionexposing the male upon momentary application} of force axially applied to the rim or; cap.

6.1Ahbzzle closure comprising an elastic cap taperingzexternally from top to base with a bore penetrating the base and terminating within the -cap, the top being partially slit transversely to thebore to provide lips norme llly compressed for closure, but flexing to a stab e gaping position exposing the nozzle upon momentary application of force axially applied to the rim of said cap, and a flange depending from the rim adapted to, be flexed upwardly about the rim for greater compression of said lips when closed.

IL A nozzle closure comprising an elastic cap tapering externally from top to base with a bore penetrating the base and terminating within the cap, the top being partially slit radially in; a manner extending sinuously to the bore to provide lips normally compressed for snug closure. but flexing to a stable gaping position exposing the nozzle upon momentary application of force axially applied to the rim of said cap.

K v 8. A nozzle closure comprising an elastic cap tapering externally from top to base with a bore 7 penetrating the base and terminating within the cap, the top being partially slit transversely at least to the upper limit of the bore to provide lips ,normally compressed for closure, but flexing to a stable gaping position exposing the nozzle upon momentary application of force axially applied to the rim of said cap, said bore being beaded at the base for snugly engaging a peripheral channel oi the nozzle.

9. A nozzle closurecomprising an elastic cap" ap ing externally from top to base, with a bore penetrating the base and terminating within the cap, the top being partially slit transversely to the bore to provide lips normally compressed for 010- sure, but flexing to a stable gaping position exposing the nozzle upon momentary application oi force axially applied to the 'rim oi! said cap, said bore being peripherally channeled at the base for snugly en aging a bead on the nozzle.

10. A nozzle closure comprising an elastic cap tapering externally from top to base with a bore penetrating the base and terminating within the cap, the top being partially slit transversely at least to the upper limit of the bore to provide lips normally compressed for closure, but flexing' to a stable gaping position exposing the nozzle upon momentary application of iorce axially applied to the rim of said cap, said top being of concave contour for further compressing said lips when closed. r

11. A nozzle closure comprising an elastic cap" tapering externally from top to base, with a bore penetrating the base and terminating within the cap, the top being partially slit transversely to the bore to provide lips normally compressed for closure, but flexing to a stable gaping position exposing the nozzle upon momentary application of force axially applied to the rimof said cap,

said rim incorporating a peripherally extending so non-extensible medium for further com said lips when closed.

12. A nozzle closure comprising an elastic cap having side walls tapering externally from top to base and with a bore penetrating the base and iii terminating within the cap, the top being pmvided with radially extending slitsterminating short oi and substant ally parallel to said s'ide walls, said slits penetrating to the bore, to provide lips normally compressed for closure, but 40 flexing to a stable gaping position exposing the nozzle upon momentary application of force axially applied to the rim of the cap.

' n I NEAL D. NIWBY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2980302 *Dec 9, 1957Apr 18, 1961Alvin G AshMetering liquid dispenser
US4580701 *Aug 22, 1984Apr 8, 1986Hitoshi TamakiAutomatic closure nozzle for collapsible containers
US4620648 *Mar 2, 1984Nov 4, 1986Dab-O-Matic Corp.Pressure-responsive valve
US4728006 *Oct 1, 1984Mar 1, 1988The Procter & Gamble CompanyFlexible container including self-sealing dispensing valve to provide automatic shut-off and leak resistant inverted storage
US4749108 *Oct 15, 1987Jun 7, 1988The Procter & Gamble CompanyBimodal storage and dispensing package including self-sealing dispensing valve to provide automatic shut-off and leak-resistant inverted storage
US4842165 *Aug 28, 1987Jun 27, 1989The Procter & Gamble CompanyResilient squeeze bottle package for dispensing viscous products without belching
US4991745 *Jan 9, 1990Feb 12, 1991Liquid Molding Systems, Inc.Dispensing valve with trampoline-like construction
US5033655 *Apr 25, 1989Jul 23, 1991Liquid Molding Systems Inc.Dispensing package for fluid products and the like
US5318204 *Mar 30, 1993Jun 7, 1994The Proctor & Gamble CompanyResilient squeeze bottle employing air check valve which permits pressure equilibration in response to a decrease in atmospheric pressure
US5531363 *Jun 10, 1994Jul 2, 1996Aptargroup, Inc.Dispensing closure cartridge valve system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/498, 222/512, 222/503, 222/490
International ClassificationB65D47/04, B65D47/20
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/2031
European ClassificationB65D47/20E2