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Publication numberUS1989289 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 29, 1935
Filing dateFeb 5, 1931
Priority dateFeb 5, 1931
Publication numberUS 1989289 A, US 1989289A, US-A-1989289, US1989289 A, US1989289A
InventorsPiazza Louis C
Original AssigneeSoundex Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall and ceiling construction
US 1989289 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' Jan. 29, 1935.`

-1 ..c. PIAZZA WALL AND CEILING CONSTRUCTION Filed Feb, 5; 1951 2 sheets-sheet 1 I I l l E I l 'mnu-Iii.

Jan. 29, 1935. L. c. PIAZZAC ,1,9895289 WALL AND CEILING CONSTRUCTION Filed Feba 5, 1951 2 sheets-sheet 2 Patented Jan. 29, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE to Soundex Corporation,

Application February 5,

13 Claims.

My invention relates broadly to the application of exterior covering materials to a room construction, and is more particularly concerned with a novel and improved wall and ceiling construction, that is to say, with a novel method and with novel means for attaching covering material to a wall or to a ceiling.

I employ as covering material a sound correcting substance, consisting generally of wood fibres pressed in blocks or slabs and held together by suitable adhesive binding substance. A block or slab of such material may be produced in any imitable and convenient size, and then cut into slabs or plates of suitable smaller size for attachment to the ceiling or to the wall inithe novel nanner which is disclosed in the present invenion.

It will be understood, of course, that the novel construction which I disclose in the instant case is not limited to the use of any particular sound correcting or sound dissipating substance or material, or, in fact, to any particular substance or material. I have mentioned wood fibres pressed in blocks or slabs of suitable size merely for the sake of giving an example. Any other suitable material or substance either for purely decorative purposes or for correcting acoustics, or both, may be employed and attached to the ceiling of a room in accordance with-the teaching of my invention. It will likewise be understood that I do not intend to limit the applicability of the invention strictly and literally to the construction of ceilings or walls. The basic principles may also be applied in the construction of structures resembling walls, such as screens or partitions, and thelike. j a

The invention discloses, thereforebroad1y a novel and improved method and means for attaching exteriorly exposed covering material.

There are several methods ,known and prac-, ticed for attaching such materials to Walls and to ceilings.

For example, one method proposes to attach the material by means of plaster, thus `merging the same with the underlying rigid building structure. Another method provides a felt padding between the covering material and the'wall or ceiling structure, securing the material by means of nails or screws, or otherwise by means of some convenient adhesive together with nails or screws.

Prior ,structures of the `character intimated above occasion numerous objections. Either they are too expensive on account of the various steps involved in the production'of the covering slabs a corporation 1931, Serial No. 513,479

in conjunction with the mounting thereof, or they present other difficulties. v

The present invention may be considered a development on the disclosures in my copending application, Serial No. 499,922, filed December 4, 5 1930, in which I have shown several embodiments. I shall first give a brief description of these prior embodiments so as to provide a basis on which my present invention may be better understood and appreciated. r

In one embodiment of the copending application mentioned above, I have provided a structural framework for attachment of the ycover slabs, which comprises a number of channel shaped carrier members attached to the ceiling or vl5 to the wall structure. Each slab is provided with a pair of bracket members having tongues which` project from opposite sides, The attachment of the slabs to the structural framework is by means of screws which fasten the projecting tongues of 20 one side of each slab to a corresponding carrier member of the structural framework, while the tongues projecting from the opposite side of ,each slab are held in place by slipping the same under the preceding slab in a row of slabs. Thus, it is 25 I merely necessary to hook the tongue of one side of each slab in interlocking engagement with an adjacent slab while the tongues on the other side of the slab are firmly fastened to the corresponding channel shaped carrier member by means of 30 l screws. v

In another embodiment also disclosed vin `the above mentioned copending application, I. have shown carrier members having depending bars` provided with holes. The slabsare fastened in rows intermediate of these depending bars and the fastening of the vslabsv is accomplished by` means of double pointed nails. i

A further embodiment disclosed in the above. mentioned copending application shows the con- 40 struction of .cover slabs each provided with brackets which maybe embedded in cement or the like. i

Now, the present application has for its principalobject a structure which is simplified in design, inexpensive in installation and which combines Lall ,the advantages of prior structures While avoiding their possible faults.

I provide in one embodiment of my present invention slabs or plates of sound correcting material and equipped slabs with brackets for attachment to a structural framework without the use of either nails or screws. All that is neces-- sary for attaching the novel slabs is to locate a slab in place relative to other slabs and to slip projecting bracket members in place so that the slab is firmly held in place.

mounted on the ceiling or wall structure and comprising a numberof supporting members in parallel relation to each other. I also provide each w slab, in one embodiment, with two bracket members. Each of these bracket members projects from the opposite side of the slab, one projection on one side of the slab being lformed into a hook and the other projectionvon the opposite side` being merely-atongue. The attachment of each slab is accomplished'by slipping the tongues of each slab between the corresponding "structural frame member and the adjacentslab, thus supporting the slab on one side, whilethe slab is supported on its other side by locking the hook- I like bracket member `into engagement miththe corresponding frame member. In other words, the slabsare positioned by slipping the same in place in interlocking engagement with each other and with"the carrier members without the`use of screws or nails. positioning operation is transversal to the carrier members and givesv the possibility of adiusting the slabs relative to each other. I Several embodiments of supporting carrier members are disclosed, as will be described later on.

Inv another embodiment of the present invention I provide structural supporting members for attachment to the ceiling or to the wall and located in parallel relation one to the other. Each of these supporting members has resilient projections and'each of the lslabs is provided with grooves on opposite sides for engaging these resilient projections on the supporting members. 'Ihe attachment of the cover slab is accomplished by pressing each cover slab in place in the space between two adjacent parallel supporting members and perpendicular thereto. The resilient projections on the supporting members snap into the grooves on the cover slabs and holdthe same in place. Y

It will therefore be seen` that the rst mentioned embodiment of the present invention pro-y vides a structure whereby the slabs are attached entirely and attach the slabs securely to the supporting framework by making use of resilient projections on the supporting frame members.

- However, if desired, the groove on the slabs may be formed by the attachment of bracket -members or simple strips of suitable material.

Either 'structure presents a novel method of constructing a covering for a wall or ceiling and simplifies 4the mounting thereof considerably. In

the first structure, it is merely vnecessary to slipa covering slab into placein interlocking relation with the supporting structure and with preceding slabs. The use of screws or nails is'en'tirely elimi- Anated andthe work of mounting is considerably simplied and cheapened. Theslabs may be adjusted relative to each other in a simple manner.

In case of the second structure, it is merely neces-A sary to provide a' structuraL framework for supporting the cover slab whereby all brackets and thelike on the slab may be entirely eliminated. All that is required is `to press the individual slabs 'into position. Eitherl theV one or the otherv em bodiment may be used in the practice. Y The rows of slabs are. mounted in eithercase across the entire width of the ceiling or a wall, transversely `to the parallel supporting members, until the Specifically, I provide a structural frameworkwork is finished and the ceiling or wall is covered as desired, presenting a neat and clean appearance.

Various effects can be produced by predetermining the formation of the slabs in accordance with a desired design or pattern. For example, a lattice eifect may be produced by arranging cover-l ing slabs of desired size accordingly. Theslabs may also be mounted in circular formation if desired. These possibilities are obvious and need not be discussed in detail.

It will at once be seen that the basic lprinciples involved in the present invention refer fundamentally to the construction of walls or ceilings, that is tov say, to the attachmentsof exteriorly exposed covering material to a structural framework, regardless of the function of the covering material which may be purely decorative or sound correcting. In my invention, the function of the covering material is shown to be sound correcting and decorative at the same time. ,The broad idea, however, disregards the function of the covering slabs entirely; any suitable material of purely decorative character may be attached to walls or to ceilings by following the principles of my invention. The term-walL-as used in this specification and in the appended claims,l is intended to cover broadlythe structureof a so that a detail description and the claims maybe readily understood.

One object of` my present invention is concerned with the application of exteriorly exposed covering material to a wall or to a ceiling and the like,'comprising a framework, cover slabs, and bracket means on each of said slabs for interlocking sliding engagement with said framework for holding said slabs in place solely by said interlocking engagement.

Another object relates to the provision of co'ver slabsffor exterior attachment to a wall or the like, and bracket means on said slabs projecting at one side thereof in form of hooks and the other side inthe form of tongues, the hook-like projections furnishing means for interlocking sliding engagement with the structural framework and the tongues being provided for supportingeach slab in interlocking sliding engagement with an adjacent slab and frame member.

Still another object has t0` do with a wall structure or the like, comprising a supporting. framework, of a plurality of members disposed in parallel to each other, 'resilient'projections on said member, and cover slabs provided" with grooves for engaging the resilient projections and for thereby locking said slabs in'place relative to said supporting framework.

I have enumerated above only the outstan objects of my invention. 'I'here 'are other objectswhich will appear as the description v1 reference' to which Figure 1 shows a section taken on linel-l.

the accompanying drawings in cin Figurev 2, `and showing supporting carrier members and cover.- slabs attached theretolby interlocking sliding engagement of brackets provided on the cover slabs;

Figure 2- shows a view of the arrangement taken on line 2 2 in Figure 1;

Figure 3 shows a detail, namely, a bracket vfor attachment to 'a cover slab such as used in conjunction with arrangement shown in Figures 1 and 2;

Figure 4 shows a modification of the supporting carrier member;

Figure 5 is a further embodiment of a supporting member;

Figure 6 represents another embodiment of a supporting member which may be used in conjunction with previously noted embodiments of the invention and which is particularly con-A structed with a view to rigidity of support;

Figure '7 illustrates a supporting member for the structural framework having resilient projection for supporting cover slabs without the use of brackets or any other provision;

Figure 8 is a section through an arrangement corresponding to the arrangement shown in Figure 1, but using supporting members such as shown in Figure 7 and slabs provided with suitable grooves for interlocking engagement with the resilient projections on these supporting members. Y

Referring now to Figure 1, it will be seen that I have provided a framework of supporting members disposed parallel to each other and each attached to the underlying structure of a ceiling or a wall and the like. Two such supporting members are shown in the drawings, Figure 1, and designated by the numerals I and 2. Each of these supporting members comprises two portions. One of these portions is I-shaped vand the other portion is T-shaped. The I-shaped portion of the member 1 comprises the sides designated by the numerals 3 4 5 and 6 7 8; the corresponding sections of the I-shaped portion of the other member 2 are designated by the numerals 9 10-11 and 12-13-14. The T-shaped members cooperating with the I-shaped members are attached to the latter in inverted position, as shown. The T-shaped member cooperating with the supporting member 1 comprises the sections designated by the numerals 16-1'7, and the T-'shaped membercooperating with the supporting member 2 comprises the sections 18 19 20. Asis shown in the drawings, the T-shaped members are attached to the I-shaped members in inverted position so as to provide slots on the lower side of the supporting members for receiving certain bracket members as will be described later on. `These slots on the lower side of the supporting member 1 are designated by the numerals 21 and 22, and the corresponding slots in the supporting member 2 as the result of the attachment of the T-shaped member to the I-shaped member are designated bythe numerals 23 and 24.

It will be seen from the drawings, Figure 1, that the portions 3 and 6, as well as the portions 9 and 12 of the supporting members 1 and 2, respectively, are relatively longer, or rather to say wider, than the corresponding portions 5 8 and 11 14, respectively. The reason'for this is to be found in the manner of attaching the members 1 and 2 to the underlying ceiling or wall structure. It will be understood that the members such as l and 2 may be relatively long and attached to the underlying structure of a ceiling or of a wall in parallel relation to each other. 'I'he narrow portion of each of the members, such as 1 and 2, points downwardly from the ceiling (incase the construction of the ceiling is considered) Therefore, the portions 3 6 and 9 12 of the supporting members, such as l and 2, respectively, are provided for the attachment to the underlying wallor ceiling structure. The attac'hment may be by means of screws through the wide sections 3 6 and 9 12. In order to attach the supporting members, such as 1 and 2, conveniently to the underlying structure, it is necessary that the attachment by means of screws or the like is not obstructed, and the base portions 3 6 and 9 12 of the supporting members are., therefore, wider than the oppositely located portions 5 8 and 11 14. This construction makes it possible to attach the members such as 1 and 2, to the underlying wall or ceiling structure conveniently without any obstruction. The holes for the screws will be located outside the lateral margin of the narrow portions 5 8 and 11 l4.

The supporting members are shown tov be constructed of sheet iron, bent and formed suitably as above described, and then assembled to provide the necessary support having a slot at its lower end. It will be understood, of course, that I have shown the construction to be of sheet iron, suitably formed into the desired shape, merely for illustrating an example of how .the invention may be realized. 'I'he supporting members may be constructed differently.

Each of the slabs, such as the slabs shown in Figures '1 and 2 at 25, 26, and 27, is provided with bracket members such as the bracket member 28 which is attached to the slab 26 by means of the nails 29 and 30. The bracket member is a strip of sheet iron, slotted at the ends. One wing of the left end is bent downwardly as indicated by the reference numeral 31 in Figure .1, and one wing of the other slotted end of the bracket 28 is also bent downwardly as indicated by the reference numeral 32 in Figure 1. These downwardly extending wings of the bracket members such as 28, engagegrooves such as 33, 34, in the slab 26 and provide means for attaching the bracket to the slab. The attachment is made by means of nails, as indicated by the reference numerals 29 and 30. The remaining wing or tongue on the left end of the bracket, such as 28, is bent to form a hook, such as is indicated in Figure l by the reference numeral 35. The remaining wing on the other end of the bracket projects laterally from the slab as indicated by the reference numeral 36 in Figure 1.

In Figure 3 is shown a bracket, such as the bracket 28 described above in conjunction with the slab 26. Parts corresponding to like parts shown in Figure 1- are designated in Figure 3 by like reference numerals.

It will be seen that a bracket such as the one discussed above has a central portion 28 and two downwardly extending wings such as 31 and 32 for engaging grooves in a slab such as 26, as was discussed above. The bracket is attached to the slab by means of nails which may extend through corresponding holes 37 in'each of the wings 31` and 32. From the left end of the central portion 28 of the bracket extends a hook like portion numbered 35, and from the right end projects a tongue indicated by the reference numeral 36.

Referring now to Figure 1, as well as to Figure 2, and bearing in mind the detail construction of the bracket shown in Figure 3 and above described, it will be seen that I have provided on each of the slabs two brackets. tached to the slab 25 are indicated by the reference numerals 38 and 39; the brackets attached The brackets atf to the slab 26 are indicated bythe reference numerals 40 and 28 and the brackets attached to the slab 27 are indicated by the reference numerals 41 and 42. Of the brackets 38 and 39 attached to the slab 25 only the right ends are shown. 'Of the brackets 41 and42 which are attached to the slab 27, only the left ends are shown in the drawings. The tongues 43 and 44 of the brackets 38 and 39, respectively, are blank projections such` as the .projection 36 shown in Figure 3. 'I'he left ends of the brackets 40 and 28 `are formed into hooks as indicated by Athe referencej numerals 43' and 35` in Figure 2. EachA ceding slab and the corresponding structural supporting member, and to hook the opposite ends of the bracket into sliding engagement with the slot on the adjacent supporting member as shown in the drawings. The' slabs will thus be securely supported and held in place without the aid of screws or nails or the like. Referring specically to the drawings, Figure 2, it will be seen that the hook projections such as 45 and 46 are in interlocking sliding engagement with -the slots 23 paredvvith (Figure 1) of the supporting member 2 which is fastened to the ceiling or to the wal1. These hook projections are the extensions of the bracket members 41 and 42 which are fastened to the slab 27. Thus, the slab 27 is held in place in the assembly of the ceiling or of the wall by the hook projections 45 and 46. The other side (not shown) of the slab. 27 is supported in interlocking sliding engagement with the preceding slab and the corresponding supporting member.

The slab 26 is put in place as follows: The bracket members 40 and 28 are transposed in their position relative to the: slab 26 when comthe positionsv of the' bracket members 41 and 42 of the preceding slab 27. The attachment of slab 26 providedwith these brackets 40 and 28, in the assembly, adjacent to the slab 27, is accomplished by slipping the projecting tongues 47 and 36 between the lower surface of the supporting member 2 and the slab 27 as is particularly shown in Figure 1. The right side of the .slab 26 will thus be held against displacement by the projecting tongues.47 and 36. 'I'he left side of the slab 26 from which the hooklike projections 43' and 35 extend, as shown in the drawings will be supported on the corresponding carrier member, such as 1, by slipping the hook-like projections 43' and 35 into engagement with the slot 2l on the supporting member 1.

.The slab 26 is now rmly supported, on one side '1 by direct sliding attachment tothe corresponding supporting member such as member 1,- by means of the hook-like projections on the brackets 40 and 28, and the opposite side is supported in interlocking sliding engagement with the preceding slabinthisparticular row.

. The next slab in the row will be the slab 25. This slab corresponds in construction to the slab 2'1 and also to the slab 2s except tp the location of the bracket members 38 and 39. These bracket members are with respect to the it is desired to assemble the slabsbracket members 40 and 28 on'the preceding slab. The attachment of the slab 25 is exactly the same as the attachment of the preceding slab, that is to say,one side'of the slab will be supported by the tongues as 43 and 44 in interlocking vsliding engagement with the preceding slab 26, while the opposite side will be supported in direct interlocking sliding engagement with the corresponding supporting carrier member on the ceiling or wall structure.

The slabs are, therefore, identical as to their general construction except that the .bracket members on each slab are transposed with regard to the preceding slab. In other words, every alternate `slab is. alikey in construction. The bracket members on the slabs are, of course, alike in construction.

The assembly of the ceiling structure as above described, proceeds lfrom right to the left. It is. Qf course, immaterial whether the attachment is started -from right to left or from left to right, due tothe fact that I have provided engaging slots onboth sides of the supporting members, such as 1 and. 2, and it is, therefore, possible to proceed with the mounting of the slabs in either direction. The slabs will be mounted in rows transversely tothe supporting member, one row adjacent to the other. The mounting is simple and efcient and the use of screws or nails for attaching the individual slabs to the supporting' structure is entirely eliminated. The sliding interlocking attachment of the slabs represents an adjustable feature whereby each slab may be exactly located and readjusted relative to the other slabs.

It will, therefore, be seen that I have provided, in the embodiment above describedia very simple and efficient construction of a ceiling or of a wall and the like which will facilitate the mounting of the covering slabs and will provide for a neat and clean work which does not require any expert' labor and eliminates a great many steps which were heretofore `necessary for the purpose of mounting the cover slabs in place. Y

An examination of the drawings in Figure 1 will show that one of the/slots on each of the supporting members such as 1 and 2.aname1y, the slots 22 and 24, respectively, is superfluous. I have. provided two slots on each of the supporting members in order to make it possible to start the mounting of the cover slabs either from the left or from the right as desired.

A modification and simplification of the supporting member is possible and may be carried out according to the structures which I have 'shown particularly in Figures 4, 5 and 6.A

Referring ilrst to Fig. 4, this figure vshows a portion of a supporting member for attachment to the underlying structure of a wall or ceiling, having a base section designated by thereference numeral 50, a ridge 51, and a lower slotted portion 52. This supporting member may be formed of sheet metal or constructed in any other desir- -I able manner. The attachment may be carried out by means of screws which may extend through holes such as 53 and 54. 'I'he lower slotted portion '52 is provided `for receiving'the hook-like extensions on the brackets provided on the various cover slabs discussed previously.

Another embodiment of a supporting member of this character is shown in Figure 5. This supporting member is again made of sheet metal suitably formed into the shape as shown, and comprises a base section 55, a ridge 56 and a lower` l slotted portion 571 'I'he attachment, as in the former case shown in Figure 4, may be made by meansof screws or nails which 'may extend through the holes such as 58 and 59. The ridge portion 56 may be strengthened by means of riveting or spot welding or in any other suitable and approved manner. It will be seen that the upper part of the slotted portion 57 is longer than the lower part, and-curved slightly upwardly, as is indicated by the reference numeral 60. This curved part 60 serves thepurpose of guiding the corresponding hook-like extension on the brackets of the slabs as they are brought into locking engagement with the portion 57. With the curved upper part 60 it is possible to slide the hook-like extensions neatly into place as they will slip along the curved portion 60 and will be guided into position.

'I'he embodiment of a supporting member shown in Figure 6 is along the lines4 of the supporting members shown in Figs. 4 and 5 with the exception that I have in this construction changed the ridge portion in such a manner as to give more structural strength to the supports. This supporting member comprises a base section designated by the numeral 61. The material isshaped so as to form two opposing ridges 62and 63. The lower end of the supporting member forms again a slot 64 With the upper part of this slot longer than the lower part. The purpose for having the upper part longer than the lower member is again to form a guide for the bracket so that the same slips easily into place. The two sides 62` and 63 may be spot welded at the points of junction as is indicated in the drawings. It will be seen-that, in this latter construction, any lateral force will be taken up by either one of the side members 62 and 63 and adequately compensated. A bending out of shape of the supporting member is, therefore, in this construction, not easily possible. It will be understood; of course, that the upper side 65 may again be curved upwardly, as shown in Figure 5, for providing a. still smoother guide for the bracket members and for thereby facilitating the attachment.

It will be seen from the above description of the embodiments shown in Figures 4, 5, and 6 that the construction of the supporting member may be simplified or changed in various ways. I have indicated only a few possible modiiications of this structure. Other modifications may suggest themselves easily to those experienced in the art. Either of the general structures shown in Figures 1, 4, 5 and 6, respectively, presents advantages and has its virtues. They may be used as occasion and local conditions demand.

In Figure 7, I have shown the structure of a supporting member for attachment to the underlying structure of a ceiling or a wall, and the like, which presents a further concept of attaching the cover slabs. The supporting member shown in this Figure 7 has a base section designated bythe numeral 68. It is bent in suitable shape as s hown in the drawings, with two sides 69 and 70 forming a structure of relatively great strength. The two sides 69 and 70 meet at their lower ends and are formed into hook-like projections such as 71 and 72. Slots such as 73 and 74 are provided throughout the entire length of the projections, as indicated in the drawings, so as to make the projections resilient. The sides 69 and 70 may be spot welded or riveted together, if desired. However, it is not absolutely necessary to provide for a rigid structure by spot Welding the sides 69 and 70 as will appear clear from the following description of the assembly. The attachment of each of the supporting members to the underlying ceiling or wall structure may be carried out by means of screws extending through holes such as 75 and 76.

A suitable number of such supporting members as shown in Figure 7 is attached to the underlying Wall or ceiling structure in parallel relation to each other. In Figure 8 I have shown a portion of such a ceiling structure in cross section illus- Vtrating the relation of two supporting members relative to each other and the relation and position of the covering slab relative to each other and to the supporting member. 'Ihe supporting members in Figure 8 are indicated. by the reference numerals 77 and 78. The attachment of these members to the underlying ceiling structure may be by means of screws as indicated by the referencev numerals 79-80 and 81-82.l The cover slabs are indicated by the reference numerals 83, 84 and 85. On opposite sides of these slabs are provided grooves such as indicated by the reference numerals 86, 87-88, and 89. The purpose of these grooves lis to hook the cover slabs in place in engagement with the resilient hook-like projection on the structural supports such as 77 and 78. These hook-like projections on the structural supports are indicated in the drawings, Figure 8, by the reference numerals 90-91 and 92-93. These hook-like projections are resilient dueto the property of the material and due to the slots such as 73 and 74 as indicated in the Figure 7.

These lstructural supporting members are mounted on the underlying ceiling or wall structure in parallel to each other in a distance from each other which is determined by the width of the slabs. When the supporting members are thus mounted on the ceiling, the attachment of the slabs can take place. The slabs are attached by 'simply sliding or pushing the same into place against the pressure of the resilient projections such as 90-91 and 92-93. Assuming for example, that the cover slab 83 hasA been slipped into position with its grooves such as 86 engaging the corresponding resilient projections on the supporting member such as 77, the next slab in the row is indicated by the reference numeral 84 and is also provided with oppositely located grooves such as 87 and 88. It is simply pressed into position against the force of the resilient spring members 91 and 92. These resilient members will recede when the slab 84 is pressed into place and will nally snap into the lgrooves 87 and 88 and locate themselves with relation to the slab 84 as is indicated in the drawings. The slab 84 is now in its proper place. f

'I'he next slab in the row, being indicated by the numeral 85, is pressed into position exactly in the same manner as discussed in connection with the slabs 83 and 84, and will assume the position as indicated in the drawings. The succeeding slabs in a row are successively placed in position until the row is finished. 'I'here will be a number of rows of slabs such as 83, 84 and disposed transversely to the parallel .supporting members such as 77 and 78. In case of cover material such as tile, or the like, the grooves may be provided directly in each individual slab. In j advantage o1 further facilitating the work of 75 mounting the slabs and eliminates the use of brackets on the slabs. It will be recalled that I have mentioned that the sides 69 and '10 of the supporting structure shown in Figure 7 may be spot welded in order to provide a rigid lstructure. -When the assembly shown in Figure 1 is examined closely, it will be seen that such spot welding is not absolutely necessary in View of the fact that the structural rigidity is obtained simply by the location of the slabs relative to the supporting members. The sides of each of the supporting members will be held in place by the engagement of the resilient hook-like projections with the grooves in the slabs.

These grooves may be formed in various'ways, for example, as mentioned previously, they may be formed by the attachment of a grooved metal strip or the like on opposite sides of the slab. Another way of forming the grooves is to cut out on each side of the slab an angular recess and to attach strips across the bottom of the slab which -project from eitherside-thereof beyond the cutout portion ofthe slab. A plate of suitable material may be substituted for the strips if desired.

I have shown certain embodiments of the invent/ion, not for the purpose of showing the limitations of the inventive idea but merely to illustrate certain ways in which it may be carried out inpractice. Modifications may be devised as toA details and as to the entire assembly of the embodiment shown in the drawings without a1- tering the spirit and the scope of the invention. I therefore Want to have it understood that I do not intend-to be limited to the details shown and described, except as they are recited `as essential in the appended claims.

What is claimed as my invention is:-

1. In the construction of a wall and the like, a structural framework comprising a plurality Vof supporting members disposed in parallel relation to each other, slabs of covering material for attachmentl to said supporting members interme- -diate thereof in abutting relationship and means on said supporting members for holding said slabs,

and cooperating means on said slabs for engag- 'ing said rst means on said supporting members,

said engagement beingieffected solely by sliding said slabs into position relative to said supporting members, wherebyA said means interlock to hold said slabs in engagement ,with said supporting members.

2. In the construction of a Wall having a substructure and a plurality of supporting strips disposed thereon in parallel relation to each othercover slabsV for attachment to said strips in abutting relationship, brackets on said slabs, and hook means on said brackets for interlocking sliding engagement with said strips, said engagement being effected solely by sliding said slabs into position-'relative to said strips in a direction transverse to said strips and in a plane substantially parallel to said substructure.

3. The construction of a cover unit for exterior attachment to a supporting structure, comprising a slab, bracket means thereon, and extensions of said bracket means projecting from opposite sides of said slab, the extensions on one side being formedinto hooks for mounting said slab in interlocking sliding engagement with said supporting structure. l

4,'The construction of a cover unit for exterior attachment to a wall having a supporting structure, comprising a slab, grooves. on opposite sides or said slab, and bracket means mounted in said 'grooves and laterally extending be'- yond said sides of the slab, the bracket means on one side ofs'aid slab being formed into hooks for mounting saidslab in interlocking sliding engagement with said supporting structure.

5. In the construction of a Wall, a plurality of supporting members, cover slabs for attachment thereto, means provided on said slabs and means on said supporting members for interlocking engagement with said means on said slabs, said engagement being eiiected solely by sliding said slabs into position relative to said supportingmembers in a direction perpendicular to said supporting members.

6. The-construction of a cover `unit for exterior attachment to a supporting structure, comprising a slab, bracket means thereon, attaching tongues provided on said bracket means fastened to opposite sides of said slab, and extensions of said bracket means projecting from said oppo-v site sides of said slab, the extensions on one side being formed into lhooks for mounting said slab in interlocking slidinglengagement with said supporting structure.

'7. The constructionof a cover unit for exterior attachment to a supporting structure, comprising a slab, bracket means thereon,.and extensions of said bracket means disposed in the same plane and projecting from opposite sides of-said slab, the extensions on one side being formed into hooks for mounting said slab in interlocking sliding engagement with said supporting structure.

` 8. The construction of a cover unit for exterior attachment to a supporting structure, comprising a slab, bracket means disposed upon a face of said slab, andextensions of said bracket means projecting from opposite sides of said slab,the extensions on one side being formed into hooks for` mounting said slab in -interlocking sliding engagement with said supporting structure.

9. The construction of a'cover unit for exterior attachment to a supporting structure comprising a slab, bracket means disposed upon a face of said slab, attaching tongues struck from said bracket means fastened to opposite sides of said slabs, and extensions of said bracket means disposed' in the same Aplane projecting from said opposite sides of said slab, the extensions on one side being formed into hooks for mounting` said slabin interlocking sliding engagement with said supporting structure.

10. In the construction of a wall, a plurality 'of supporting members, cover slabs'for attachon said supporting members for interlocking engagementiwith said grooves, said engagement being effected solely by sliding said-slabs into position relative to said supporting members in a direction perpendicular to said supporting members.

11. Ina construction of a wall'having a substructure, a plurality of supporting members disposed on said substructure, cover slabs-for attachment to said supporting memberin rows extending transversely thereto, and-brackets on each of said slabs extending from opposite sides thereof, the extensions on one side being' formed into hooks,- the attachment of said slabs being effected solely by-sliding each of said slabs inte position relative to said supportingV members in' a direction transversely to said members and in a plane substantially parallel thereto,"whereby said bracket hooks on -one side of `said slabs will interlock with said supporting membersand the relative to each other, the method of mounting cover slabs having brackets extending from opposite sides of said slabs with the extensions on one side formed into hooks exteriorly of said 10'- framework in parallel rows transversely thereto consisting solely in sliding the hooks of each cover slab intointerlocking engagement with a' corresponding supporting member and simultaneously sliding the extensions on the other side of said slab into interlocking engagement with-a preceding slab.

13. The construction of a cover unit for exterior attachment to a supporting structure comprising a slab of sound insulating material,

, bracket means thereon, extensions onsaid bracket means projecting from opposite sides of said slab, the extensions on one side being formed into hooks for mounting said slab in interlocking sliding engagement With-said supporting structure.

LOUIS C. PIAZZA.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2465756 *Nov 11, 1943Mar 29, 1949Frank SchepisClip for metal lath and beading
US2474363 *Nov 19, 1943Jun 28, 1949Pittsburgh Corning CorpMounting of cellular glass slabs
US3998014 *Oct 14, 1975Dec 21, 1976United States Gypsum CompanyProtective edge configuration for structural sheeting
US4107887 *Jan 20, 1976Aug 22, 1978United States Gypsum CompanySound absorbing system
US7926228 *Oct 8, 2010Apr 19, 2011Snow William LCremation niche
DE952299C *Jun 27, 1953Nov 15, 1956Siporex Int AbTragkonstruktion, insbesondere Gebaeudedecke oder Dacheindeckung, aus nebeneinanderliegenden Leichtbetonplatten
EP0158905A2 *Mar 29, 1985Oct 23, 1985WIB Wortmann Industriebau GmbHDouble shell wall system
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/506.9, 52/144
International ClassificationE04F13/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0803
European ClassificationE04F13/08B2