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Publication numberUS1989353 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 29, 1935
Filing dateNov 1, 1933
Priority dateNov 1, 1933
Publication numberUS 1989353 A, US 1989353A, US-A-1989353, US1989353 A, US1989353A
InventorsEdward D Davis
Original AssigneeBoye Needle Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitting pin and stitch gauge
US 1989353 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 29; 1935. E. D. DAVIS 1,989,353

KNITTING PIN AND STITCH GAUGE will! Patented Jan. 29, 1935 I I UNITED STATES KNI'I'I'ING PIN AND STITCH GAUGE Edward D. Davis, Chicago, 111., assignor to The Boye Needle Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application November 1, 1933, Serial No. 696,283

6Claims.

This invention relates to a knitting pin and stitch gauge.

An object of the invention is to provide means for readily determining the size or size number of a knitting pin and for accurately showing in connection therewith other information with resp'ect to the corresponding crochet hook size, the number of stitches to the inch for a specified type of material. Vice versa, the invention disthe proper size oi, a pin and crochet hook for a given cloth or fabric. Other specific objects and advantages will appear as the specification proceeds.

The invention is illustrated, in a preferred embodiment, by the accompanying drawing, in which- Figure 1 is a plan view of a device embodying my invention; Fig. 2, a broken transverse sectional view through thecentral portion of the device; and Fig. 3, a broken rear view of a portion of the bottom disk showing the scale provided.

In the illustration given, A designates a lower disk; B, an upper smaller disk; and C, a rivet uniting the two disks in concentric and rotatable relation.

The bottom disk A may be formed of paper, wood fibre, celluloid, or any other suitable material. It is larger than the upper disk B and provides a free marginal portion 10 in which are formed gauge openings 11. Preferably,- each of the gauge openings is centered between division lines 12 which mark oil equal sectors of the marginal area 10. The heavy division lines 13 which are drawn on opposite sides of the disk divide the marginal area 10 into two major divisions 13' and 13. In the area 13', the gauge openings are designed for pins other than double-point steel pins. In the division 13', the gauge openings are designed for double-point steel-pins. In each of the divisions, and at the outer side of each opening are numerals indicating the millimeter size of the opening. At the inner side of each gauge opening are numerals indicating a standard number under which the needles of the size indicated by the opening are sold in the United States.

The inner top surface 14 of disk A is provided with data (not fully shown) arranged in circular paths and adapted tobe exposed through openings in the upper disk B as will be later described. The innermost path 15 discloses numerals indicating the number of stitches to an inch. The next circular path 16 shows a series of crochet hook sizes as indicated by letters or numbers. The outermost circular path 17 discloses types of fabrics, yarns, etc.

V The upper disk 3 may, like disk A, be formed of any suitable material. It is provided preferably with a fan-shaped opening 18 adapted to disclose the information in circular path 15. Adjacent the opening 18 may appear words such as number of stitches" or number of stitches to the inch" etc. On theopposlte side of the rivet C is another sector opening 19 which discloses the letters or numerals in the circular path 16. Ad- Jacent this opening may appear the words corresponding crochet hook size or some similar designation. On the other side of the rivet C and spaced slightly from the opening 18 is a large fan-shaped opening 20. The opening 20 discloses the information in the large circular path 1'1.

Adjacent the opening 20 appear the words material used. Any other suitable designation may be employed to indicate the relation of the information on the path 17 with the information disclosed through the other openings. If desired, a pointer 21 may be formed at the outer edge of disk B and centrally disposed with respect to the opening 20.

As shown more clearly in Figs. 1 and 3, I prefer to cut away a portion of the outer edge of disk A to form a straight line-22. On the reverse side of disk A I have provided a scale 23 having its outer edge formed by the straight line 22.

Operation Because of the prevailing practice of designating needle pin sizes by artificial numbers and in other instances in millimeters, and of the practice of designating corresponding crochet hook sizes by different numerals and letters, the task of finding the proper size of a knitting pin has become complicated and onerous. The difliculty is increased when one endeavors to find the number of stitches which can be made in a particular type of material by a particular knitting pin and its corresponding crochet hook. In the operation of the above described device, all the desired information can be obtained quickly and conveniently. If it is desired to find the size of the particular pin of the double-point steel type, a point may be placed in the openings in division 13 to ascertain what opening it flts. The number directly above the opening will then indicate the diameter of the pin in millimeters and the number below the opening 11 will indicate the standard number of the pin. Similarly, if it is desired to know the size of a pin other than the double-point steel type, the pin may be inserted in one or more of the openings 11 in division 13' to find the opening which it fits. Above the opening is designated the diameter of the pin in millimeters, and below the opening 11 appears the standard size of the pin. To determine the corresponding crochet hook size, the upper disk B is rotated to bring the point 21 in line with the center of the opening 11 in which the pin is placed. In this position, the division lines 12 practically form a continuation of the side walls of the opening 20 in the upper disk B. Through the aperture 19 now appears a letter or numeral indicating the corresponding crochet hook size.

Through the aperture 18 appears the number of stitches to the inch J or inches designated. Through the aperture 20 appears the type of material to which the crochet hook and knitting pin are adapted and to which the information with respect to the number ofstitches applies. In the illustration given in Fig. 1, the knitting pin has been found to fit the opening 11 in division 13 having a millimeter size of 5% and a standard number size of 10. The corresponding crochet hook size is J. The material suitable for such a knitting pin and such a crochet hook is heavy rug wool or candlewick cotton. The number of stitches for such material are three stitches to two inches.

Many other obvious methods of using the gauge may be employed. For example, the customer may have purchased a particular type of material such as boucle and desires to find the proper knitting pin size and the proper crochet hook size. The upper disk B is rotated until the customer or salesman sees through aperture 20 the word boucle. The disk B is then centered with the adjacent division lines 12 and with the pointer 21 aligned with the center of the adjacent opening. The numbers above the opening indicate the millimeter size and the number below the opening indicates the standard size of the proper knitting pin. Through the aperture 19 appears the size of the corresponding hook.- Through the aperture 18 appears information as to the number of stitches to the inch or inches designated. To ascertain readily the size of the stitch, the scale 23 on the reverse side of disk A may be applied to a strip of material. Other obvious uses and methods of operating the gauge will be apparent and further description is believed unnecessary.

It will be understood that any desired unit of measurement may be employed in place of inches or millimeters. For example, instead of showing the number of stitches per inch or inches, the

indices may be changed to show the number of stitches per millimeter or other unit of measurement. It will also be understood that the lower disk A is suificient in itself for indicating the various information desired and, if desired, the upper disk B may be removed. The lower disk may be circular, rectangular, square, or of any other desired shape.

While I have described the invention, for the purpose of illustration, as useful for determining readily related data bearing on knitting pins, crochet hooks and particular fabrics, etc., it is obvious that the invention has other uses to which it can be appliedby making slight changes and githout departing from the spirit of my inven- The foregoing detailed description has been given for cleamess of understanding only, and no I unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom, but the appended claims should be construed as broadly as permissible, in view of the prior art.

I claim:

1. In a device of the character set forth, a pair of concentric disks rotatably secured together in superposed relation, the lower of said disks being larger than the upper and having a free marginal area provided with gauge openings and having data arranged in concentric circular paths on its surface below said .upper disk, said upper disk ing a relation to the article fitting the said gauge opening. 1

2. In a device of the character set forth, a pair of concentric disks rotatably secured together in superposed relation, the lower of said disks being larger than the upper and having an outer marginal area provided with gauge openings and also having on its-inner topsurface data arranged in arcuate paths, said upper disk being provided with aligned'openings over said paths alignable with one of said gauge openings. and exposing data bearing a relation to the article fitting said gauge opening.

3. In a device of the character set forth, a pair of concentric disks rotatably secured together in superposed relation, the lower of said disks being larger than the upper and having a free marginal area providedwith division lines dividing said area into equal sectors, gauge openings cenplurality of openings tered within said sectors, said lower disk having also on its inner upper surface data arranged in arcuate paths, said upper disk having near its outer periphery a fan-shaped opening with edges alignable with the division lines of one of said sectors, and at least one other opening in said. upper disk, said openings in the upper disk being above said corresponding arcuate data paths and being adapted to expose data bearing. a relation to the sector with which said first-mentioned opening is aligned.

4. In a device of the character set forth, a pair of concentric disks rotatably secured together in superposed relation, the lower of said disks being larger than the upper and having a free marginal area provided with gauge openings, said gauge openings varying in size and constituting a plurality of gauge scales, said upper disk also having on its upper inner surface circular paths of data, said upper disk being provided with openings aligned with said paths and at least one of said openings being alignable with one of said gauge openings to disclose data through said openings bearing a relation to the knitting pin fitting said gauge opening.

openings being adapted to receive knitting pins,

said upper disk being provided with a plurality of openings, at least one of which is alignable .with one of said gauge openings and each of said openings being adapted to expose data appearing on the lower disk.

6. In a device of the character set forth, a pair of concentric disks rotatably secured together in superposed relation, the lower of said disks being 5. In a device of the character set forth, a pair 7 larger than the upper and having afree marginal area provided with gauge openings and having data arranged in concentric circular paths on its surface below said upper disk, said upper disk being provided with a plurality of aligned openings extending .=to both sides of the center of the upper disk, said openings in the upper disk being alignable with one of said gauge openings to expose data through said disk openings bearing a relation to the article fitting the said opening.

EDWARD D. DAVIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2679697 *Oct 21, 1952Jun 1, 1954Thebodeau Henry EGauge for machine screws
US2956358 *Jun 9, 1954Oct 18, 1960Ralph W PenningtonMenu selector
US3276685 *Mar 31, 1959Oct 4, 1966Anderson Edgar ACombination radar intensity calculator
US3277591 *Mar 17, 1964Oct 11, 1966William RutkofskyDecorator style selection chart device
US3995379 *Sep 4, 1975Dec 7, 1976Fred Willi Karl WerberKnitting
US4533328 *Mar 15, 1984Aug 6, 1985Mcdaniel Francina EPermanent wave or hair curling rod and associated hair curl display device
US5117561 *Jan 2, 1991Jun 2, 1992Greenslade Joe ERotatable gauging plate for a fastener dimension measuring machine
US5269086 *Sep 3, 1992Dec 14, 1993Tomes William ADecorative photo/imagery display and date reminder
US6413091 *Oct 27, 1997Jul 2, 2002Robbie Mae FieldsCreative stitchery success strips
US7032413 *Dec 22, 2004Apr 25, 2006Denyse SpecktorKnitting needle sizing structure and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/555.2, 235/88.00R, 434/95, 40/495, 434/404, D10/64
International ClassificationD04B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04B3/00
European ClassificationD04B3/00