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Publication numberUS1991965 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1935
Filing dateAug 19, 1933
Priority dateAug 19, 1933
Publication numberUS 1991965 A, US 1991965A, US-A-1991965, US1991965 A, US1991965A
InventorsSteinbreder William J
Original AssigneeSteinbreder William J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Receptacle
US 1991965 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 19, 1935. w. J. STEINBREDER 1,991,965

RECEPTAGLE Filed Aug. 19, 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet l A rrO/E/YE V Feb. 19, 1935. w. J, STEINBREDER 1,991,965

RECEPTACLE 7 Filed Aug. 19, 1933 2 Sheets- Sheet 2 14 7' TOR/YE V Patented F eb. 19, 1935 PAIR 'T. OF E wima nstinp der, Pine La nQMo. I Application August n), 1933,-Serial No. 85,795

5Glaiiiis.'"(0l.'220-7 6) This invention relates generally toreceptacles; and more specifically to more or less rectangular receptacles of the box or case type" adapted for use in storing, handling, and shipping bottle goods and various other commodities, thepredominant object Of'thfl invention being to pro vide an improved receptacle of the type mentioned which is constructed of a combinationof metal and wooden wall portions;

Prior to this invention receptacles of'the type to which this invention relates were produced which were constructed wholly ofwooden walls suitably secured, together. Also'heretofore such receptacles havebeen made entirely 'ofmetals, the wall portionsthereof being weldedor otherwise secured together. Receptacles of" the two constructions mentioned have certain advantages and certain disadvantages which result f'rom such constructions, and the prime purpose ofthis invention is to construct animproved receptacle of a combination of wood and metal so as to obtain in the resultant structure the advan; tages of the wood andof the metal structures, without havingthe disadvantages of such struc tures. Fig. 1 is a perspective of the improved 'rec'ep-f tacle.

Fig. 2 is a' perspective view ofthe metal'portion only of theimproved receptacle. i

Fig. 3 is a vertical section on line 3 3jof F ig;j1.

Fig. 4 is a vertical section on line 4+4 of Fig.1.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary section showing a corner construction of the improved're-' ceptacle. LI"

Fig. 6 is afragmentaryhorizontal section illus: trating a modified form of the invention. ,7

In the drawings, whereinis shown for' the purpose of illustration, merely, oneembodiment or the invention, A designates the improved receptacle generally. The receptaclefA includes a metallic portion B and opposed end walls C which are formed of wood orother suitable material, said end walls C being provided with suitable hand holes D' to facilitate handling the receptacle.

The metallic portion B of the receptacle A is of approximately U-shaped formation, as shown most clearly in Fig. 2, there being a portion B which provides the bottom of the receptacle, an upstanding portion B which provides the front wall of-the receptacle, and an upstanding portion B which provides the rear wall of the receptacle. The upstanding portions B and B preferably are formed integral with the portion B, and said upstanding portions are provided 'tion B.

with suitable marginal and intermarginal ribs, as indicated at. 1 in thedrawings, in order to give to; said portions the required rigidity. At the opposite ends' of each of the upstanding portions B and B sectionszof said upstanding portions are pressed outwardly, as shown clearly Figs. 1, 2, and 5, to provide integral, outstanding, vertically disposed marginal strips 2, vertically extended shoulders 3 being present at thepoints where these marginal strips; 2 join the main bodies of the upstanding portions. B and B against which the wooden end walls C of the receptacle abut. The portion 'B? of the metallic portion .B .of the receptacleflis provided .with

downturned marginal ribs 4' which extendlongitudinally of said'portion B at the points where the portionB joins the upstanding portions 12. and B and downturned intermediate ribs 5 which extend longitudinally of the receptacle between the ribs 4 arealso associated with said por- These ribs of the portion vB give to said portion thenecessary rigidity to withstand the usage to which it is subjected. Also, at the opposite ends of the portion B of the metal portionB off-the receptacle, sections 6 of said portion B are depressed as shown most clearly in Fig.4. These depressed sections, whichextend the entire width of. the receptacleA, receive in contact therewith the lower edges of the wooden endwalls C of the receptacle, and said wooden end walls abut'against shoulders 7 located at the points where the depressed sections join the main body of the portion B. Y Along the outer edges of the depressed mar.- ginal strips 2 of the upstanding portions B? and B of themetallic portion B of the receptacle I pro-v vide fastening prongsfl which fora majorityv of their lengths extend parallel'with the outer. faces of the wooden-end walls of. the receptacle, as shown most clearly. in Fig. 1'. tions of the fastening prongs are bent at an approximate-right angle with respect to the associatedsportions. thereof and are sharpened, and these right angularly bent outer portions are driven into the wooden end walls C of the receptacle. In this manner the wooden end walls C and the metallic-front and rear walls 1-3 and B are securely fixed together. The portion B of the metallic portion 13 of the receptacle is provided at its opposite ends with similar fastening prongs 9 which extend upwardly therefrom. These prongs 9 extend parallel with the outer faces of the wooden end walls C of the receptacle,

. The outer end pore spect to the associated portions thereof to provide prong portions which are driven into the wooden end walls of the receptacle for securely fixing the wooden end walls to the bottom of the receptacle.

In addition to the fastening prongs 8 and 9 already referred to, I provide prongs 10 which are formed on the vertically disposed strips 2 at opposite ends of the upstanding portions B and B of the metallic portion B- of thereceptacle. These prongs 10, which are arranged in vertically spaced relation, are formed by producing V- shaped slits in the strips 2 and displacing the metal portions within the slits so that such metal portions are extended at an approximate right angle with respect to the strips. The prongs 10 are driven into the vertical edge portions of the wooden end walls C located-at the front-and back of the receptacle so as to augment the wall-securing action obtained through use of the prongs 8 By preference I provide the upstanding portions B and B of the metallic, portion 13 of the receptacle with rolled upper edges, as indicated at the points designated by the'reference character 11. This arrangement eliminates sharp edges which might cause damage. v

A receptacle made" in accordance with this invention is of very strong construction because of the arrangement of providing the shoulders 3 and '7 against which thewooden end walls abut, and because of the useof the many prongs 8, 9, and 10 which securelyattachsaid wooden end walls to the metallic portion of the receptacle. The improved receptacle is stronger than a similar receptacle formed wholly of wooden walls and bottom,'and it'is cheaper to make than a receptacl made entirely of metal-the'walls. and bottom of which mustobe joined by spot welding or other relatively expensive methods. My areceptacle is extremely simple to make and assemble in that the metallic portion thereof is a relatively simple stamping, and because it may be assembled in a very simple manner with inexpensive machinery.

In Fig. 6 I illustrate a modified form of the invention in accordance with which the bottom B" is provided with circular depressions 12 which may receive the lower endsrof the bottles.

I claim: 7 1 V l. A receptacle of the class described comprising a metallic portion providing the bottom and a pair of opposed upstanding walls of the recep tacle, a pair of opposed non-metallic wall portions associated with said metallic portion in a mamier to produce the structure of the receptacle, prongs 'formed on said metallic portion at opposite edges of said bottom and opposed upstanding wall portions and driven into the outer faces of said nonmetallic wall portions so as to secure said nonmetallic wall portions and said metallic portion together, and additional prongs formed on said upstanding wall portions of said metallic portion and driven into thevedges of said non-metallic wall portions. 7

2. A receptacle of the class described comprising metallic wall portions, non-metallic wall portions associated with said metallic wall portions in a manner to produce the structure of the receptacle, shoulders formed on said metallic wall portions against which said non-metallic wall portions abut, and fastening prongs formed on said metallic wall portions and driven into said non-metallic wall portions in a direction toward said shoulders so as to secure said metallic and non-metallic wall portions together. I

3. A receptacle of the class described comprising a metallic portion providing the bottom and a pair of opposed upstanding walls of the receptacle, a pair of opposed non-metallic wall portions associated with said metallic portion in a manner to produce the structure of the receptacle,

shoulders formed on said bottom and said upstanding walls of said metallic portion against which said non-metallic wall portions abut, and prongs formed on said metallic portion and driven into said non-metallic wall portions in a direction toward said shoulders so asto secure said nonmetallic wall portions and said metallic portion together. r

. 4. A receptacle of the classdescribed comprising a metallic portion providing ,thebottom and apair of opposed upstanding walls of the receptacle, a pair of opposed non-metallic wall portions associated with said metallic portion in a manner to produce the structure of the receptacle, shoulders formed on said bottom and said upstanding walls of said metallic portion against which said non-metallic wall portionsabut,

prongs formed on said bottomand saidupstand ing wall portions of said metallic portion at opposite ends thereof and driven into the outeriaces of said nonmetallic wall portions so as to secure" said non-metallic wallportions and said metallic portion together, and additional prongs formed on said upstanding wall portions of said metallic portion and driven into edges of saidnon-metallic wall portions.

4 5; A receptacle of the class described comprising a one-piece metallic portion providing the bottom and a pair of opposed upstanding walls of the receptacle, a pair of opposed non-metallic wall portions associated withsaid metallic portion in a manner to produce the structure of the receptacle, shouldersiorined on said bottom and said upstanding wallsof' said metallic portion against which said non-metallic wall portions abut, prongs formed on. said bottom and said upstandin'gwall portions of 'said metallic portion at opposite ends thereof anddriven into the outer faces of saidonon-rnetallic wall portions so as to secure said'nori-mtallic wall portions and'sald metallic portion together, and additional prongs formed )on said ,upstanding wall portions of said metallic portion and driven into edges of said nonmetallic wall portions. 4

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2530481 *Nov 5, 1945Nov 21, 1950Kaiser Aluminium Chem CorpMilk crate
US4809851 *Apr 3, 1987Mar 7, 1989World Container CorporationCollapsible container
US5161709 *Nov 29, 1990Nov 10, 1992World Container CorporationHinged collapsible container
WO1998023414A1 *Nov 25, 1997Jun 4, 1998Howard E AntramAutomated banking machine enclosure manufacturing method
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/682
Cooperative ClassificationB65D15/22
European ClassificationB65D15/22