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Publication numberUS1992676 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 26, 1935
Filing dateJun 15, 1933
Priority dateJun 15, 1933
Publication numberUS 1992676 A, US 1992676A, US-A-1992676, US1992676 A, US1992676A
InventorsEugene Schwarz
Original AssigneeMantle Lamp Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Light-transmitting body
US 1992676 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 26, 1935. E SCHWARZ I 1,992,676

LIGHT TRANSMITTING BODY Filed June 15, 193s 1N VEN TOR. foei/vf 5mn/mez,

ATTORNEY.

Patented Feb. 26, 1935 LIGHT-TBANSMITTING BODY EugeneSchwarz, Alexandria, `Ind., assignor to The Mantle Lamp Company of America, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application June 15, 1933, Serial No. 675,875

15 Claims.

My inventionlrelates to light-transmitting bodies of any kind, and isrespecially applicable ing. This coatingwhich resembles a mist, and,v

optically considered, clouds transmitted light, may be applied to a surface of the sheets in such a manner as to vary the translucency of portions of the sheets to thereby produce ornamental and pleasing designs. Physically, the surface will be of suede-like character.

In the accompanying drawing, Figure 1 is a fragmentary view of a sheet embodying the invention; Q

Figure 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken on the line 2 2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is another enlarged cross-sectional view taken on'the line 3-3 of Figure 1;

Figure 4 shows a stencil; and

Figure 5 shows an open-mesh stencil.

In carrying out my invention, as an example,`I apply to a surface of parchment paper 1 a translucent or transparent adhesive 2, suchas, for

instance, varnish or lacquer, and while this adhesive is still in a tacky condition an excess of flock 3 of desired shades, colors or translucency, is dusted thereon. Saidadhesive is then allowed -to dry. The excess ock is then shaken, dusted or sucked away from the surface of the paper. The remaining ock, which adheres to the paper, forms a suede-like coating through which any ornamentation on that surface may be seen. Also, ornamentation may be formed on the suede-like surface.

This adhesive coating may be applied to the entire surface ofthe paper, or to selected areas thereof, to thereby produce desired designs. For this purpose, a stencil 4, which determines the areas to which the adhesive is to be applied, may be employed, or, as an alternative', the adhesive may be printed or sprayed on the parchment paper. A

The stencil 4 may, as shown in Figure 4, be a metal sheet having openings 5 of desired designs through which the adhesive 2 may be laid on the surface of the parchment paper 1, but, preferably, said stencil is an open-mesh silk screen 5a, shown in Figure 5, selected areas 6 of-which are masked by a substance 7 which lcloses the meshes at those areas, so that the adhesive 2 reaches the surface of the parchment paper only through the still open meshes 8 of said silk screen. i

Preferably, the parchment paper 1 is orna- 5 mented with translucent and colored designs before the adhesive 2 and the iiocculent coating 3 are applied, although,- if desired, only uncovered areas 9.0i said paper may later pe thus ornamented, -or said ornamentation may, at the same l()l time be applied to the covered areas.

While it is preferable to apply the ornamentation and the flocculent coating t the same surface of the sheet of parchment paper, satisfactory results may be attained by ornamenting one surl5 face ofsaid sheet, and by applying the occulent coating to the other side thereof, said sheet being so highly translucent that transmitted light renders both the ornamentation and said occulent `coating plainly visible.

The method herein described permits the making of very pleasing ornamental parchment shades of varying translucency. The variation in translucency between the flock-coated and uncoated areas of the shade, greatly accentuates the color Y designs in the uncoated areas and gives a brilliancy to these designs which is notattainable if the shade possesses the same translucency throughout.V

Having `thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. An ornamented lightgtransmitting sheet of shade material having' a translucent iocculent coating directly and adherently lapplied to a sur-- face thereof `and overlying the ornamentation of said sheet. o Y 2. A light-transmitting sheet having designs on a surface thereof, and a occulent translucent coating overlying said designs.

3. A light-transmitting sheet having designs on a surface thereof, and a translucent occulent coating overlying portions only of said designs.

4. A light-transmitting body having varied designs on portions thereof, and flocculent material overlying certain of saiddesigns only.

5. A light-transmitting body having varied designs on portions' thereof, and flocculent material coinciding with certain of said designs only. ,Y

c. A iight-transmitting sheet inmaterialv having, 5 adherently applied to its surface, a translucent flock coating for clouding desired areas of said sheet. Y

'7. A 'light-transmitting lamp shade having translucent ock as a translucent coating.

8. A translucent lamp shade having trans' lucent ock adherently applied to parts of its surface for varying the translucency of parts of said shade.

9. A light-transmitting lamp shade having adlucent sheets which involves superilcially coating one side of selected areas of a translucent sheet with-a translucentl adhesive, applying 'liock to said adhesive while it is still in a tacky condition, allowing said adhesive to dry, and removing herently applied to its surface a translucent iiock Lexcessive and non-adherent portions of said flock to thereby render the retained ock thin and coating for reducing the translucency of certain areas of said shade and for giving to those areas a suede-like finish.

10. Light-transmitting parchment paper having an adherent translucent coating of flock.

11. Light-transmitting parchment paper having adherently applied to its surface Aa translu cent ock coating for reducing the translucency of certain areas thereof, and for giving to those areas a suede-like finish.

12. The method of producing ornamental translucent sheets which involves supercia1ly` coating a translucent sheet with a translucent adhesive, applying flock to said adhesive while it is still in a tacky condition, allowing said adhesive to dry, and removing excessive and non-adherent portions of said flock to thereby render the retained ock thin and translucent.

13. The method of producing ornamental transtranslucent.

14. The method of producing ornamental translucent sheets which involves superflcially coating a translucent sheet bearing translucent designs, with a translucent adhesive, applying flock to said adhesive while it is still in a tacky condition, allowing said adhesive to dry, and removing excessive and non-adherent portions of said flock to thereby render the retained ock thin and translucent.

15. A light-transmitting sheet of shade material, comprising a transparent sheet of parchment paper, a dried and translucent adhesive adherently attached to said parchment paper, and a thin and translucent layer of flock adherently united to said adhesive.

EUGENE SCHWARZ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2431169 *Oct 8, 1945Nov 18, 1947Dice Harold EReflector skullcap
US2555505 *May 18, 1950Jun 5, 1951Louis PlumboOrnamental structure
US2745339 *Mar 19, 1951May 15, 1956Valiela Fernandez JoseApparatus for decorating concave and convex surfaces
US2882631 *Sep 5, 1952Apr 21, 1959Boone PhilipDisplay materials, devices and systems
US4202922 *Jan 23, 1978May 13, 1980Osment David LModel trees
US4278481 *Oct 15, 1979Jul 14, 1981Osment David LMethod of constructing simulated vegetation for models
US4859510 *Oct 30, 1987Aug 22, 1989Albert RademacherArtificial vegatation or plants or parts for the same
US7465485Nov 30, 2004Dec 16, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Process for dimensionalizing flocked articles or wear, wash and abrasion resistant flocked articles
US7632371Oct 22, 2007Dec 15, 2009High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked transfer and article of manufacture including the application of the transfer by thermoplastic polymer film
US7749589Sep 20, 2006Jul 6, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked elastomeric articles
US7799164Jul 27, 2006Sep 21, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked articles having noncompatible insert and porous film
US8007889 *Apr 28, 2006Aug 30, 2011High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked multi-colored adhesive article with bright lustered flock and methods for making the same
US8168262Jun 14, 2010May 1, 2012High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked elastomeric articles
US8206800Nov 2, 2007Jun 26, 2012Louis Brown AbramsFlocked adhesive article having multi-component adhesive film
US8354050Jan 14, 2008Jan 15, 2013High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Co-molded direct flock and flock transfer and methods of making same
US8475905Feb 14, 2008Jul 2, 2013High Voltage Graphics, IncSublimation dye printed textile
US20100126390 *Oct 5, 2007May 27, 2010Formway Furniture LimitedScreen
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/206, D05/32, 428/88, 428/90, 428/403, D05/37, 427/206
International ClassificationB44F1/06, B44F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB44F1/06
European ClassificationB44F1/06