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Publication numberUS1993134 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 5, 1935
Filing dateMar 15, 1932
Priority dateMar 15, 1932
Publication numberUS 1993134 A, US 1993134A, US-A-1993134, US1993134 A, US1993134A
InventorsWilliam W Ford
Original AssigneePatent & Licensing Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Siding material
US 1993134 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. W. FORD SIDING MATERIAL "Mal" 5, 1935.

Filed March 15, 193.2

A.TT 0 NEiks I N VEN TOR. %/m Mal Y m am,

Patented Mar. 5, 1935 PATENT. OFFlCE smnwe MATERIAL William W. Ford, Boston, Mass., assignor to The Patent and Licensing Corporation, Boston,

Mass., a corporation of Massachusetts Application March 15, 1932, Serial No. 598,961

8 Claims.

This invention relates to shingle strips and is more particularly concerned with strips suitable for siding, prepared from asphalt-saturated and coated felted fibrous material.

In the cutting of shingle strips from a parent sheet of roofing material it is of paramount importance that the strips be cut with minimum waste and that strips possessing the maximum coverage, consistent with safety, when laid in overlapping courses, be cut from the minimum amount of material.

One of the objects of my invention isto provide a method of cuttingshingle strips from a sheet so that a minimum amount of material is required strips are laid in overlapping courses.

Another object of my invention is to provide a shingle strip the area of which is unusually small as compared with shingle or siding strips as made heretofore having the same amount of headlap and exposure.

A further object of my invention is to provide a strip which is not flimsy and will not easily tear during handling.

Further objects and advantages of my inven-. tion will be manifest from the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawing of which;

- Figure lisaplanviewoiashinglestripmade in accordance with my invention;

Figure 2 is a plan view illustrating a method of cutting strips in accordance with my invention from a sheet of roofing material;

Figure 3 is a plan view of a plurality of strips made in accordance with my invention, laid in overlapping courses.

Referring to the drawing, the numeral 1 indicates a shingle strip having a plurality of tabs 2, separated by narrow slots or cut-outs 3, extending along the lower edge of the strip. The upper edge of the strip is scalloped so as to form a series of alternate complementary extensions 4 and recesses 5. The strip is so designed that an extension occurs over each slot and also midway between adjacent slots. In the particular shingle shown in the drawing the tabs are rectangular in shapewand the contour of the upper edge of the strip is a series of regular waves.

The'upper or body portion 6 of the strip is preferably surfaced with fine mesh granular material, preferabLv of dark color, and the tabs are surfaced with coarser mesh granular material preferably red in color in order to simulate ordinary brick. The surfacing of coarse granular material to cover a given area of wall structure when the on the tabs extends to a line a small distance be low the inner edgesof the slots.

The strips may be made in various sizes, due consideration being given to the production of strips which will cover the greatest surface area for the smallest amount of material and at the same time provide the necessary amount of safety and strength. With these considerations in view I have found a strip 36 inches in length having an exposure of 3 inches and a headlap of inch to be satisfactory. The depths of the cut-outs will be 3 inches. The vertical distance from the inner edge of'the cut-out to the line joining the innermost points of the recesses will be 1.5 inches 7 and the vertical distance from the line joining the innermost points of the recesses to the outermost point of the extensions will be 2 inches. Hence two rows of strips can be cut from a sheet 11 inches in width. Approximately 134 strips, 36 inches in length and having an exposure of 3 inches, are required to cover 1 square square feet of surface). Therefore the amount of material measured in square feet necessary to cover a square when made into strips in accordance with my invention will be- V inch headlap require- The saving efiected by my strips is 33.53 square feet per square.

In addition to the large saving in material the strip is designed in such manner that it is not flimsy and subject to liability of tearing. Heretofore, various strips have been designed with the purpose in view of saving material. However, these strips have extensions above the tabs but not above the cut-outs or slots. If strips, containing the amount of material which is present in strips made in accordance with my invention, were made with recesses instead of extensions opposite the slots, the distance from the inner edge of the cut-outs to the lowermost points of the recesses would be only 1% inches,-

= 184.22 square feet X134=217-75 square feet.

thereby making the strips extremely flimsy and subjecting them to liability of tearing during handling. In accordance with my invention this objectionable feature has been obviated by providing an extension above the cut-outs as well as between the cut-outs so that the depth of the material above the cut-outs amounts to 3 /2 inches.

In preparing the strips in accordance with my invention a sheet 10, of felted fibrous material is saturated and coated with asphalt and surfaced preferably with fine mesh granular material ll, of dark color. Longitudinal bands of asphalt coating are then applied to the marginal portions'of the sheet. The bands are preferably of less width than the depth of the slots, the distance between the inner edge of the bands and that of the slots being substantially equal to the width of the slots. The bands are then surfaced with coarser mesh granular material of such color as to simulate brick. The sheet is then trans versely slotted along the marginal portions so as to form two longitudinal rows 14, 15, the slots of one row being staggered in relation. to those of the other. The slots may be cut in the sheet before applying the bands of coating. The sheet is then slit along a sinuous. line 16, between the edges of the sheet, whereby adjacent strips having alternating complementary extensions and recesses are formed, and severed transversely along two longitudinal lines 17 connecting the inner edges of the cut-outs with the topmost point of the extensions, whereby to form the shingle strips. The lines 1'? in one row are staggered in relation to the lines of the other row.

As shown in the drawing the strips are severed so as to be formed with four tabs on each strip, but this number may vary. It is also apparent that any number of rows of strips which is a multiple of two can be formed from a sheet of appropriate width. Thus, for example, if it is desired to out four rows of strips from a sheet 22 inches in width, a longitudinal band of double width would be applied along the median line of the sheet and bands of single width would be applied along the marginal portions; and transverse slots of double depth would be cut alohg! the median line of the sheets and slots of single depth would be out along the marginal edges. The sheet would be slit longitudinally on a straight line along the median and along a sinuous line between each longitudinal edge and the median line of the sheet so that the rows of strips adjacent to the median lineare formed butt to butt and adjacent rows on either side of the median line are formed back to back. The adjacent rows on each side of the median line would be transversely severed into strips in the same manner as set forth in connection with Figure 2. L

As shown in Figure 3 the strips are adapted to be laid in overlapping, horizontal courses in which the strips of one course are staggered in relation to those of adjacent courses. The strips are laid so that the bottom edges of the tabs of tar joints 18. The surfacing on the body portion of subjacent strips is also exposed beneath the cut-outs of superjacent strips to simulate vertical mortar joints 19. The cut-outs of the overlapping strips overlie the extensions on subjacent strips. The dotted lines indicate the upper edges of the underlying strips and illustrate the manner in which the extensions of subjacent strips cooperate with the slots of the overlapping strips.

It is apparent that the tabs can be shaped other than rectangular and that the upper edge of the strip can be out along zig-zag lines instead of a sinuous curve.

I claim as my invention:

1. A shingle strip having a pluralityof tabs separated by slots along one edge and a series of alternate extensions and recesses along the opposite edge, said extensions occurring opposite each slot and mid-point of each tab.

2. A shingle strip having a plurality of tabs separated by recesses along one edge and a series of complementary extensions and recesses along the opposite edge, the contour of said last mentioned edge being an undulate curve, the crests of the curve occurring opposite each slot and midway between adjacent slots.

3. A shingle strip having a plurality of rectangular shaped tabs separated by slots along one edge, the opposite-edge havingthe contour of an undulate curve with alternate crests and troughs, the crests of the curve occurring opposite the slots and mid-points of the-tabs.

4. A shingle strip having a plurality of tabs along its weather edge and a series of substantially semi-circular projections and recesses alternating along the opposite edge, the number of said projections and the number of said recesses each exceeding the number of said tabs, the spacing between mid-points of adjacent tabs being twice that between the mid-points of adjacent projections.

5. A shingle strip having a plurality of tabs defined by slots along 'its weather edge, and a series of substantially semi-circular projections and recesses alternating along its upper edge, one said projection being opposite each slot and the mid-point of each tab.

6. A shingle strip having a plurality of. tabs along its weather edge, the opposite edge of said strip having a contour of regular waves with a wave-length substantially equal to half the distance between a point on any said tab and the corresponding point on the next adjacent tab.

7. A shingle having a plurality of tabs along its weather edge, the opposite edge of said strip having a contour of regular waves, the mid-points of successive tabs being directly opposite 'the crests of alternate waves.

8. A shingle strip having a plurality of tabs along its weather edge and a plurality of tabs along its upper edge, the spacing between midpoints of successive tabs on the weather edge being twice that between the mid-points of successive tabs on the upper edge.

WILLIAM W. FORD.

Classifications
U.S. Classification52/559, D25/139
International ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D2001/005, E04D1/26
European ClassificationE04D1/26