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Publication numberUS1993208 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 5, 1935
Filing dateJun 28, 1930
Priority dateJun 28, 1930
Publication numberUS 1993208 A, US 1993208A, US-A-1993208, US1993208 A, US1993208A
InventorsAbraham Cohn
Original AssigneeAbraham Cohn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe
US 1993208 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. sol-1N March 5, 1935..

' SHOE Filed Jjme 28; 1930 @OOG GO. @QGQQOQ 00 0 v INVENTOR: 6 0/272,

ATTORNEY. I

Patented 5, 19 35 I t V I UNITED STATES i PATENT OFFICE snot:

Abraham Cohn, St. Louis, Mo. Application June 28, 1930, Serial No, 464,538

8 Claims. (01.36-17) Y My invention relates, generally, to shoes for width of the insole within the bounds of; the men, ladies and children and particularly to an stitched inseam 6- securing the insole and welt improved construction for Goodyear welt shoes. to the upper and within the bounds of the turned The object of my invention is to provide a perunder lower heel edge portion '7 of the counter forated elastic filler and a shank and heel stiffener portion of theupper which provides the usual heel 5 which are adapted to be interposed between the seat 8 for the shoe. A

insole and outsole of Goodyear welt shoes with In carrying out the particular aim-of my inthe filler disposed wholly within the inseam and vention, I cement or similarly secure a resilient heel seat cavity of the shoe to set up a combined rubber fi le B having the Shank Portion 9 a a 10 elastic and pneumatic cushion effect for the enh P t 10 t0 the lowe ace of the insole 3 10 tire foot of the wearer of the shoe, and, which ineluding'the S a and heel Portions 9 a d 10 1 structure will permit the shoe to be assembled and the o and the fi e A is adapted t py manufactured upon a, production b i i h only space within the bounds of the aforesaid factories without the necessity of employing inseam and heel seat cavity between the insole 3 special machinery otnow used in the manufacand outsole 1 0f the s 15 ture of the present'day styles of shoes. VA shank and heel stiffener 11 is provided with A'further object of the invention is the provi ,an integral longitudinally a d t ansv y nsion of means adapted to be interposed between ee-ved-eenvexed heel P a seetien 12 and is P the insole and outsole 01' a Goodyear welt shoe erebly, although not necessarily P d w 9- between the shank and heel sections thereof, centralized aperture 13 and the shank and its 20 which possesses advantages in points f simplicity heel section are formed from suitable gauged and efllciency, and, at the same time proves itself metal, fiber y Other material which y v comparatively inexpensive in cost of manufacund suitable for the purpose inten d- I lay ture. v the shank and heel stiffener 11 upon the lower with the above and oth objects i view, t face of the shank portion 9 of the elastic rubber 25 invention consists in th novel feature f o filler A and the dished heel portion 12 thereof is struction, arrangement and combination of parts pp t tact with the lower face of the hee hereinafter more fully desc ibed d finally section 10 of the rubber elastic filler, which heel pointed out in the claim h r t appendei section 10 of the rubber elastic filler is provided Referring to the accompanying drawin formwith a centralized thickened portion to provide 30 ing a part of this specification, wherein like chara suitably shaped D 8 ug e e s on 14 diacters of reference denote similar parts throughreeted downwardly from the lower face 01 the out the several views; heel portion 10 of the elastic. filler, and the lower Fig. 1 is a view in vertical sectional elev ti endoportion of the plug or lug extension 14 is I of the lower portion of a Goodyear w lt h o adapted. to be received in the centralized aper- 35 bodying the features or my inv ti ture 13 of .the heel plate section 12 of the shank Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional elevation of the and heel stiffener Thejshank and heel stiflheel and counter section of the shoe taken on lines enel' 11 is Preferably, although not rily 2-2 of Fig." 1. i nailed, as at 15 to the filler and insole so as to 40 Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the shank and hee1 hold it against displacement upon the shank and 40 stiflener. heel portions of the rubber elastic filler A to facili- Flg. 4 is a bottom plan vi w of t rubber. 1 t tate further operations to be performed in the I filler with a part of the shank and heel stiffener manufacture o the shoe d not essa i y applied thereto. be nailed in position,"as othermethods of secur- Fi 5 i 1 m d1 1 vertical sectional View ing hate the filler may be employed, such for in-. 45

- of the shank and heel stiflon' r; stance as cementing it thereto or securing it ;In the drawing, A designate generally, a shoe thereto in any well known equivalent manner y of the type which-is known to the trade as a known t the shoe g- Goodyear welt shoe, and which includes the out- After the shank and heel stifiener has b sole 1, the welt 2, the insole 3 and the upper 4, assembled and secured in position upon the arch The reference numeral 5 designates a a it and heelsections 9 and-l0 of the rubber elastic formed upon, the insoledue to the stitched inseam fil e A, the outsole 1 is s t d as d n t 16 e which unites the insole and welt to the upper. to the welt s the eel portion 17 or the The cavity 5 known as the inseam and heel seat outsole 1 is nailed down into contact with the cavity extends approximately the full length and heel portion 12 of the shank and heel stifiener 11 and the heel seat 8 of the shoe by means of nails designated 18 driven into the heel seat of the shoe. After the outsole has been applied to the shoe, a plurality of .heel lifts 19 are secured in position upon the outer face of the heel portion of the outsole by means of nails 20 and then a rubber or other suitable heel 21 is applied to the lifts 19 by. means of nails 22 which pass into' the heel seat of the shoe by passing around the edge of heel plate section 12 of the shank and heelstiifener 11.

Due to thefact that the shank and heel stiffener of 'my improved shoe structure extends to.

the heel portion of the shoe, and, further due to the fact that the heel section 12 'of the shank and heel stiffener is longitudinally and transversely concaved-convexed and provided with a central aperture 13 of such shape as to receive the plug or lug extension 14 of the heel portion 10 of the resilient rubber filler A, it will be observed that I providea shoe structure which will provide an elastic and pneumatic cushion sole 'for the shoe and give an elastic and pneumatic cushion effect to the ball, the arch and to the heel of the foot of the wearer of the shoe with.

plug extension 14 between the heel end 12 of the'shank and heel stiffener 11 and the heel portion 10 of therubber elastic filler A.

In order to lighten the rubber elastic filler and to afford a pneumaticeffect to the sole of the shoe, as well as an elastic, or resilient effect, I provide the-filler A with a multiplicity of vertically disposed punched openings 24, including.

the shank and heel sections 9 and 10 thereof, and I further provide the plug extension 14 of the heel section 10 of the filler with a plurality of suitable punched vertical openings 25 to provide a multiplicity of air pockets for the rubber elastic filler between the insole and outsole throughout the entire area thereof, as well as the air pocket 23 surrounding the 'plug extension 14 of the. heel portion of the elastic filler.-

By insertingthe lower end of the rubber elas- .tic plug 14 of the heel portion 10 of the filler A, in the opening of the dished heel portion of the arch shank, it prevents shifting displacement of the lower end of the ,plug extension relative to the heel portion .of the shank and heel stiffener and the air space surrounding the plug extension between the heel portion of the flller' and the heel portion of the shank and heel stiffener permits the heel portion 10 of the filler to yield downwardly and the plug extension to expand radially in yieldingunder pressure to accommodate the shape of the bottom of the heel of the wearer of the shoe and to afford a greater amount of elastic and pneumatic cushion effect to the heel of the foot thanto the arch and ball positions thereof, yet aflording a substantial centralized elastic and pneumatic cushion effect to the heel to prevent any uneasiness to .the wearer of the shoe by properly shaping itself to support the-heel of the wearer of the shoe to make walking and standing non-tiresome to the foot.

Therubber filler of my present invention, it

will be apparent from-the illustration, is of unlform thickness throughoutits entire area ex-; cepting at the plug extension thereof, thus before being applied to the shoe, its upper and lower planes are parallel arranged. The lower face of the plugiis also preferably fiat and parallel to the upper and lower planes of the filler proper. The lower face of .the plug extension being flat establishes a slight air space 26 between the lower face of the plug extension and the concaved upper'face of the heel portion of the outsole when the lower end of the plug extension is received in the aperture of the dished heel plate portion of the arch shank. This lower air space 26 also aids with the air space 23 around the plug extension in allowing the plug extension to be compressed by heel pressure to cause the upper plane thereof to readily shape itself to the shape of the bottom of the heel of the wearer of the shoe. The. same effect is provided when the heel portion of the shank and heel stiffener is not-provided with a central aperture to receive the plug extension, as is manifest.

A shoe of the character disclosed, must of necessity be made in quantity production, hence the simple and practical manner of assembling has been worked out only through extensiveerperiments and, as shown, the shoe is considered by shoe experts a far reaching improvement over my former Patent Number 1,476,690, which can be made by a cobbler all right,.but not under any circumstances can it be made in quantity production, as modern shoe machinery cannot be utilized in the manufacture of the shoe constructed as disclosed and illustrated in my former patent.

The many advantages of the herein described invention will readily suggest themselves to those skilled in the art to which it appertains.

From the foregoing description, it is evident that a simple device for this purpose has been disclosed, but it is to be understood that I do not desire to restrict, or limit myself to the very de tails of the construction shown and described, which is merely illustrative, it being obvious that changes, not involving the exercise of invention, may be made without conflicting or departing from the spirit of the invention within the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. In a Goodyear welt shoe construction, a perforated elastic filler interposed between the insole and outsoleof the shoe including the shank and heel portions thereof, a perforated centralized elastic extension directed downwardly from the lower face of'the heel section-of the elastic filler, a metallic plate interposed between the shank and heel portions of the elastic filler, and the outsole and the heel portion of the metallic plate being dished to provide an air pocket surrounding the perforated elastic extension of the elastic filler.

2. In a Goodyear welt shoe construction, a perforated elastic filler interposed between the insole and outsole of the shoe including the shank and heel portions thereof, a centralized elastic extension directed from the lower face of theheel I portion of the elastic filler, a metallic plate interposed between the shank and heel portions of the elastic filler and the outsole, the heel section of the plate being dished to establish an air space surrounding the elastic extension of'the heel portion of elastic filler between the heel portions of the insole and the plate, and said elastic extension of the heel portion of the elastic filler having a plurality of vertical openings to provide air pockets within the elastic extension and between the heel portions of the insole and said plate.

3. In a Goodyear welt shoe, an elastic rubber filler interposed between the insole and outsole of the shoe including the shank and heel portions thereof, a centralized elastic rubber extension directed from the lower'face of the heel portion of the elastic filler, and a metallic plate interposed between the shank and heel portions of the elastic filler and the outsole, the heel section of the plate being dished and provided with a central opening to receive the lower edge portion of the rubber elastic extension of the heel portion of the elastic filler to cause the lower face of the extension to seat upon the upper face of the heel portion of the outsole and to establish an air pocket surrounding the extension between the elastic filler extending beyond the sides of the downward elastic extension of the filler and the dished heel portion of the plate.

4. In combination with a shoe having an outsole and an insole and an inseam and a heel seat cavity therebetween, a resilient rubber filler arranged between the outsole and the insole of the shoe and filling said cavities, said filler including a sole, shank and heel portions each provided with a plurality of punched out openings, a shank and heel stiffener having a central opening in the heel portion thereof and seated upon the outer face of the shank and heel portions of the filler and the heel portion of said filler. spanning the opening in the heel portion 'of the shank and heel stifiener'.

' plicity of individual air pockets, 9. combined shank and heel stiffener having a central opening in the heel portion thereof, said heel portion of the shank and heel stiffener being dished downwardly and a portion of the heel portion of the filler spanning the opening in the heel section of the combined shank and heel stiffener so that the spanning heel portion of the filler will be sub- -ject to resilient yielding movement into the said central opening due to heel pressure during walking movements of a person wearing the shoe to aflord greater resiliency at the central heel portion of the shoe than at the shank and foot portions thereof.

6. In combination with a Goodyear welt shoe having an inseam and heel seat cavity between the insole and outsole of the shoe, the heel seat cavity being dished in relation to the inseam cavity, a non-sponge yieldable resilient rubber v filler having a sole, shank and heel portion provided with a plurality of individual separated vertical openings positioned in the inseam and heel seat cavities between the insole and outsole of the shoe to provide a plurality of individual air pockets between the insole and outsole, a resilient rubber projection directed downwardly from the central portion of the lower face of the heel portion of the filler and small in relation thereto, and said plug being seated on the dished heel portion of the outsole to provide an annular air chamber between the heel portion of the filler adjacent the projection and the dished heel portion of the outsole.

7. A shoe construction of the Goodyear type comprising, in combination, an upper, a welt, an

downwardly to deepen the heel seat cavity, a nonsponge resilient rubber filler provided with a plurality of individually separated vertical openings, said filler being cemented to the bottom face of the insole and occupying the inseam and heel seat cavitiesbetween the insole and outsole of the shoe and an apertured resilient rubber projection small in relation to the heel portion of the filler and directed downwardly from the lower face thereof, said plug being seated on the inner face of the dished heel portion of the outsole to provide an annular air chamber surrounding the rubber projection between the heel portion of the filler adjacent the projection and the dished heel portion of the outsole.

8. A shoe construction of the Goodyear type comprising, in combination, an upper, a welt, an insole having inseam and heel seat cavities, an outsole having the heel portion thereof curved downwardly to deepen the heel seat cavity, a nonsponge resilient rubber filler provided with a plurality of individually separated vertical openings and cemented to the bottom face of the insole to occupy the space formed by the inseam and heel seat cavities between the insole and outsole of the shoe, an apertured resilient rubber plug on the lower face of the heel portion of the filler, and a combined shank and heel stiffener having an opening in the heel portion thereof seated on the bottom face of the shank and heel portions of the filler and the lower edge portion of said resilient rubber plug passing through the opening ABRAHAM COHN';

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2758397 *Jun 7, 1954Aug 14, 1956Riggs Florida LShoe construction
US3125816 *Feb 16, 1962Mar 24, 1964 Gartner
US5025573 *Jun 4, 1986Jun 25, 1991Comfort Products, Inc.Multi-density shoe sole
US5572805 *Nov 1, 1994Nov 12, 1996Comfort Products, Inc.Multi-density shoe sole
US5595003 *Feb 20, 1992Jan 21, 1997Snow; A. RayAthletic shoe with a force responsive sole
US6145220 *Nov 22, 1995Nov 14, 2000Georgia Boot, Inc.Cushioned footwear and apparatus for making the same
US6195915Aug 16, 1999Mar 6, 2001Brian RussellAthletic footwear sole construction enabling enhanced energy storage, retrieval and guidance
US6327795May 17, 1999Dec 11, 2001Britek Footwear Development, LlcSole construction for energy storage and rebound
US6330757Aug 18, 1998Dec 18, 2001Britek Footwear Development, LlcFootwear with energy storing sole construction
US6446359 *Jan 19, 2001Sep 10, 2002Lotto Sport Italia S.P.A.Ventilated shoe sale structure
US6802138Feb 8, 2002Oct 12, 2004Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Cushioning system for footwear and related method of manufacture
US6842999May 12, 2003Jan 18, 2005Britek Footwear Development, LlcSole construction for energy storage and rebound
US7036245Dec 8, 2003May 2, 2006Britek Footwear Development LlcSole construction for energy storage and rebound
US7168186Jan 18, 2005Jan 30, 2007Britek Footwear Development, Inc.Sole construction for energy storage and rebound
US7337559Dec 22, 2005Mar 4, 2008Newton Running Company, Inc.Sole construction for energy storage and rebound
US7877900Sep 18, 2009Feb 1, 2011Newton Running Company, Inc.Sole construction for energy and rebound
US7921580Jan 19, 2010Apr 12, 2011Newton Running Company, Inc.Sole construction for energy storage and rebound
WO1987007481A1 *Jun 2, 1987Dec 17, 1987Comfort Prod IncMulti-density shoe sole
WO1992003069A1 *Aug 20, 1991Mar 5, 1992Albert Ray SnowAthletic shoe with a force responsive sole
WO1993003639A1 *Feb 20, 1992Mar 4, 1993Albert Ray SnowAthletic shoe with a force responsive sole
WO2013074562A2Nov 14, 2012May 23, 2013Nike International Ltd.Footwear having corresponding outsole and midsole shapes
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/17.00R, 36/76.00R, 36/37, 36/30.00R, 36/28
International ClassificationA43B13/18
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/181
European ClassificationA43B13/18A