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Publication numberUS1994425 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 12, 1935
Filing dateMar 10, 1934
Priority dateMar 10, 1934
Publication numberUS 1994425 A, US 1994425A, US-A-1994425, US1994425 A, US1994425A
InventorsWeller William W
Original AssigneePad Y Wax Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Waxing pad
US 1994425 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 12, 1935. w. w. WELLER WAXING PAD Filed March 10, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR William W Wei/er ATTORNEY March 12, 1935. w w WELLER 1,994,425

WAXING PAD Filed March 10, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR William W. Weller B 744 6% 0 ATTORNEY Patented Mar. 12, 193-5 UNIT-ED 'T STAT "WAXING rm) William w. Weller,

New York Application March 19, 1934,

4 Claims. (01. 91- 25) The present invention'relates to waxing pads of the type adapted to be used in applying wax or the liketo furniture, woodwork and automobile bodies. V

These pads are made up of a size convenient to be held in the hand and are preferably'provided with astrip adapted to pass over the fingers, or may be larger for fioor waxing.

It is contemplated that the smaller waxing pads will each be provided with an amount of wax material sumcient for waxing a car body, or for the housewife to wax a number of pieces of furniture. 7 I

According to the present invention, the waxing pads preferably employ an impervious flexi ble backing layer, which may be fabric treated to be resistant to hydro-carbon solvents, a pervious outer layer, preferably of netting or marquisette, and wax. The wax is made available by being distributed throughout a layer of material composed of very loose fibers which act as av cellular retaining medium or reservoir for the wax. The wax mass is preferably of the wax and organic solvent type, containing about 50% to 90% of volatile solvent and from 10% to 50% of solid material consisting of parafiln, camauba, Montan, and ceresin waxes, etc. Where the wax material is absorbed in the fibrous layer, itis introduced whileheated just above the melting point of the mixture. A measured amount of such wax'may be poured onto a completed pillow so-as to fill the interstices in the fibrous layer. 1

Other and further objects of the invention will appear as the description proceeds.

The accompanying drawings show for purposes of illustrating the present invention two of the many possible embodiments in which the invention may take form, it being understood that the drawings are illustrative of the invention rather than limiting the same. In these drawings:

Fig. l is a perspective view showing the waxing pad in use;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view with parts broken away showing interior construction;

Fig. 3 is an inverted elevational view showing the front or working face of the pad;

Figs. 4 and 4a are perspective and sectional views illustrating the packaging of the pad;

Fig. 5 is'a perspective view of the invention showing a modified form of construction;

Fig. 6 is a top plan view diagrammatically showing a set up of a machine for making pads;

Fig. '7 is a side elevational view of the same;

or the like. .gether with a length of tape, indicated at 13,

. use. It is sealed by a timed, and the fourth side is sewed up,

Chester, N. 3., assignor to Pad-Y-Wax Company,

1pm, a corporation or Serial No. mm.

Fig. 3 illustrates the arrangement of needles and shears; and

- Fig. 9 illustrates the filling spouts.

The pad'shown in Figures 1, 2, and 3 is provided with an impervious backing 10 which may be in the form of light canvas, duck, or denim, rendered impervious to the hydrocarbon solvent for the wax by impregnating it with a nitro cellulose solution, or the like. Adjacent to this backing sheet is a layer 11 of absorbent material such, for example, as loosely-carded fibers of tex- 'tile material ordinarily referred to as a bat. These fibers are preferably kept as loose as possible so that the maximumintersticialspace is available, and yet handle the matted sheet. This absorbent material is covered by a layer 12 of pervlous material suchas netting, marquisette,

These. three layers of material, to-

which forms a handle strap, are sewed together by stitching, extending along the *edges of the article, as indicated at 14.

After these parts havebeen stitched together, the pad is inverted, as shown in Figure 3 and a measured amount of the wax mass (wax and solvent), heated to render it fluid is flowed onto the pad. This wax and solvent wets the fibers and immediately extends throughoutthe entire body of absorbent material. The process for making these pads is shown in Figs. 6 to 9 inclusive.

These pads may be packaged for sale as indicated in Figs. d and 4a, by inserting them in an envelope 15, preferably of a laminated materia1, such as paper or fabric treated to render it substantially vapor proof. The envelope may have a printed trade mark and directions for strip of Scotch tape 16 and this prevents loss of solvent by evaporation.

In the form.shown in Fig. 5, a backing layer 100, and a layer 120 of netting are stitched together to form a sack-like article. A layer 110 of wax or wax bearing material is then introif desired.

A waxing operation is easily carried out by means of one of these pads. The user merely slips the fingers under the strap 13 .so as to hold the. pad on the hand and then can rub the pad lightly over the surface to which the wax is to be applied. The pressure will cause a small amount of the wax mass to flow and pass through the foraminous material so-as to be deposited on the surface of the furniture, automobile body or Other article. This provides a thin film of wax REiSUED for polishing. The fibrous body in which the wax is distributed readily gives up the wax during the rubbing operation. It readily bends to fit the surface of the article being polished. The knead--- ing incident to such use tends to work the wax toward the face or cover.

It is contemplated that these wax pads will be approximately four inches square and in the neighborhood of an eighth to three-sixteenths of an inch thick, so that each pad will have sufficient wax for covering the surface of the car body or for a number of pieces of furniture. The weight of the loosely carded fibers is exceedingly small as compared with the weight of the wax mass (wax and solvent) which is absorbed in and about the fibers. The fibers in the wax act as a reservoir and dispensing agent so that the wax is gradually made available. If desired, the strap 13 may be wide enough to extend to the end of the pad and be stripped down so as to form a pocket for the fingers.

A' suitable method of making the pads shown in Figures 1-3 is indicated in Figures 6-9 inclusive. The supply of backing material is indicated at 20, the lightly carded material at 21,

the netting at 22 and the tape for the straps at 23. This material may be first passed through a battery ofmultiple stitching and slitting machines indicated at 24, having needles 24 and 24" and knives 24" to 25, 26, 26 and to cut the material, to form narrow strips, as indicated at 27. The strips are fed along a table and passed under a knife 28 bywhich they are cut off to lengths sufiicient for several pads. The strips are then passed through another battery of stitching and slitting machines 29 which sew up the other sides of the pillows, as indicated at 20, and cut them apart, as indicated at 31. The pillows are then turned over so that the netting is on top and passed,

by a belt or other suitable device, under a battery of filling spouts 32 connecting with a tank 33 containing the wax and solvent of the desired composition and heated just warm enough to be fluid. Valves 34 control the flow of wax so that the proper amount is discharged. The warm wax passes through the netting and distributes itself all through the spaces in the fibrous layer, where it quickly stifiens so that the pads may be packed. It.will, of course, be understood that the pads may be sewed up, one at a time out of properly cut layers, and the wax flowed onto the pad from a heated dish.

A It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes may be made in the device as illustrated without departing from the spirit or scope of the appended claims.

form stitches indicated atsaid fibre layer, said cover member being permeable to said wax mass, whereby during use of said pad to apply wax to a surface, the said wax mass will be gradually fed to said surface through the cover member from the wax retaining medium.

2. A waxing pad comprising a backing member,

a pervious fabric cover member and an absorbent layer of non-felted, l0ose1ycarded, unspun fibers therebetween, forming a high capacity wax-retaining medium, said backing member containing a cellulose composition impervious to wax and solvents therefor; and a,. wax mass comprising wax and wax-solvent distributed through and retained by said fibre layer, said cover member being permeable to said wax mass, whereby during wax to a surface, the said wax mass will be gradually fed to said surface through the cover member from the wax retaining medium.

3. A waxing pad comprising a backing memby which it is rendered use of said pad to. apply ber, a pervious fabric cover member and an absorbent layer of non-felted, loosely-carded, unspun fibres therebetween, forming a high capacity wax-retaining medium, said backing member being impervious to wax and solvents therefor; a wax mass comprising wax and wax-solvent distributed through and retained by said fiber layer, said cover member being permeable to said wax mass and a handle secured to the backing side of the said pad, whereby during use ofsaid pad to apply wax to a surface, the said wax mass 40 .will be gradually fed to said surface through the cover member from the wax retaining medium, and the pad may be securely held in place on the hand of the operator.

4. A waxing pad comprising a backing member,

a pervious fabric cover member and an absorbent layer of non-felted, loosely carded, unspun fibers therebetween, forming a high capacity' wax-retaining medium, said backing member being impervious to wax and solvents therefor; a

wax mass comprising wax and wax solvent distributed through and retained by said fiber layer, said cover member being permeable to said wax mass and a handle strap secured to the backing side -of said pad by stitching serving to hold the said backing and cover members. together.-

WILLIAM W. WELLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2521817 *Aug 10, 1948Sep 12, 1950Andresen Henry AAutomatic wax mat
US2621784 *Dec 6, 1948Dec 16, 1952Annette CaldwellMedicament or cosmetic applicator package
US2853730 *Jan 24, 1956Sep 30, 1958Ready IncDisposable pad for a mop
US3029453 *Oct 20, 1958Apr 17, 1962Norman Frances PLint type particle adhesive removal device
US3896518 *Mar 16, 1973Jul 29, 1975Landstingens InkopscentralImpregnated laminated pad for mops
US4683001 *Aug 23, 1985Jul 28, 1987Kimberly-Clark CorporationOne step dry-and-shine polishing cloth
US5694659 *Jan 30, 1997Dec 9, 1997Merrion; T. GregEyewear lens wiping device
US7584519 *Jun 5, 2003Sep 8, 2009The Clorox CompanyDisposable mitt or glove containing treatment composition
US7653961 *Feb 2, 2010Timothy Paul ProbascoGlass cleaning device
US8171593 *Jan 20, 2009May 8, 2012Sprague Edwin JGolf towel
US20030106812 *Jan 10, 2003Jun 12, 2003Wilkman Michael A.Impregnated wipe package with features improving handling and reducing transdermal migration
US20040237235 *Jun 1, 2004Dec 2, 2004Visioli Donna LynnMultipurpose disposable applicator
US20040244132 *Jun 5, 2003Dec 9, 2004William OuelletteDisposable mitt or glove containing treatment composition
US20060053575 *Sep 16, 2004Mar 16, 2006Cary RaglandDisc duster
US20080034521 *Aug 13, 2007Feb 14, 2008Timothy Paul ProbascoGlass cleaning device
US20090193598 *Jan 20, 2009Aug 6, 2009Sprague Edwin JGolf towel
US20120023632 *Feb 2, 2012Nick ProvenzanoHand protecting device
WO2005055797A1 *Dec 2, 2004Jun 23, 2005The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable, nonwoven cleaning wipes, and kits comprising them
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/104.94, 15/227, 15/209.1
International ClassificationA47L13/16, A47L13/19
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/19
European ClassificationA47L13/19