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Publication numberUS1994644 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1935
Filing dateDec 9, 1932
Priority dateDec 9, 1932
Publication numberUS 1994644 A, US 1994644A, US-A-1994644, US1994644 A, US1994644A
InventorsNorman P Harshberger
Original AssigneeBakelite Building Prod Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Art of building material
US 1994644 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1935- N. P. HARSHBERGER v ART OF BUILDING MATERIAL Filed Dec. 9, 1932 I l J IN V EN TOR.

A TTORNEYS.

ting will Patented Mar. 19, 1935 PATENT OFFICE ART OF BUILDING MATERIAL Norman P. Harshberger, Scarsdale, N. Y., as-

signor to Bakelite Building Products Co. Inc.,

New York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware Application December 9, 1932, Serial No. 646,402

20 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in the art of building material and more particularly to building material for "use on walls, ceilings, floors or on any other surface where tiling or plastic block surfacing material might be used.

The invention has reference to the economical formation of a section of surfacing material comprising a multiplicity of tiles or,plastic blocks wherein the section may be applied to the surface as an individual unit. The invention may, however, be utilized in such form that each tile or block formation is applied separately.

With the usual method of laying tiling or blocks wherein cement or the like is utilized as a securing means, a number of disadvantageous physical conditions and uneconomical practices are present. It is necessary to obtain a bond between the substance forming the block and the substance used as the binder between blocks, and if the binder used is a dry mortar, quick settake place and a non-waterproof joint will result. If the binder is of a cream-like consistency, it frequently oozes out between blocks and stains the face of the latter and the surface surrounding it. In addition to the above-mentioned objectionable feature of present day ,practices, shrinking frequently takes place whenthe mortar between blocks sets and an imperfect bonding results. If a gum or asphalt of a hard variety is employed as the binder, checking in the binder results. A gum or asphalt of the soft variety permits displacement of one unit with respect to another. As a result of the oozing before mentioned it is necessary under present practices to perform a finishing operation on the wall or other surface after it has been covered with the blocks and this finishing operation. consists of an acid or abrasive treatment to produce a clean, unstained finish.

/ It is one of the objects of the present invention to overcome the above-mentioned objectionable features of present methods of laying tiling or blocks by providing building material in which displacement of one block with respectto another is eliminated, in which the oozing of mortar or other binding material is prevented, and in which the laying of a wall, ceiling or the like is greatly faclitated'.

A further object. of the invention is to provide an improved methodof laying tile blocks or the like wherein the latter may be pre-formed in groups and wherein binding material is caused to enter the spaces between the individual tiles of each group and between the tiles of adjacent groups in a very/novel manner to prevent staining of the surface of the blocks.

A further object of the invention is to provide I an improved method of laying tiles or blocks as above described wherein the binding material may be so formed as to cause it to be either flush with the surface of the blocks, in the form of grooves, or in the form of ridges.

With the above and other objects in view, the invention consists of improvements in the art of building material and all its parts and combinations as set forth in the claims and all equiv-' alents thereof.

In the accompanying drawing in which the same reference numerals indicate the same parts in all of the views:

Fig. 1 is an elevational view showing the webbing used as a base with a multiplicity of blocks formed thereon, the mesh of the webbing being omitted in parts for purposes of clarity;

Fig.2 is a broken elevational view of the complete article showing the covering sheet thereon;

Fi 3 is a. perspective view of a fragment of a wall showing the novel construction, parts being broken away;

Fig. 4 is a, cross-sectional view showing a fled form of covering sheet;

Fig. 5 is a similar sectional view showin another form of covering sheet;

Fig. 6 is an elevational view of another form of unit;

V Fig. '7 is an elevational view showing a modified form of unit wherein only a single block or tile is utilized, part being broken away; and

Fig. 8 is a cross-sectional view of another modified form of the invention wherein the mesh is intermediate the blocks to permit reversal.

The article may be made in various other forms and shapes, those illustrated being merely shown byway of example.

Referring more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2. the unit utilizes a backing or webbing 1 made of either a flexible or rigid mesh of any suitable material such as metal or cloth, or the webbin may be formed of netting, perforated sheet ma- \terial or exceptionally porous material. Secured to the face of the webbing and embedded at least flush with its back is a plurality of blocks 2' formed of a plastic material which have been cast or molded into position and formed to represent bricks or other building units. The blocks may also be preformed veneer blocks to which a backing of plastic material has been applied, the layer of plastic material being of sufiicient thickness to provide for penetration of the webbing modithereinto. When the plastic material has set, the blocks become a permanent and rigid attachment to the webbing as shown in Fig. 3. The blocks when cast or formed on the webbing are spaced apart and staggered in brick-like relation to form the spaces 3. It is preferred to form a plurality of rows of blocks on the webbing as shown and the blocks of one row are so offset as to cause staggering of the blocks at the ends of the unit to provide for an-interlocking fit with adjacent units and thereby provide a continuous surface when the sections or units are secured in position. The webbing in Fig. 1 is shown as extended at the left and at the top so as to permit blocks of a section laid at the left and above to overlap the backing of the first section.

proper relation with the webbing of adjacent units and abut the latter.

With the form of construction illustrated in Fig. 7 only one tile or block 2a. is formed on the webbing 1a and the webbing is shaped to extend beyond all of the edges of the block as at 3a.

In the form of invention illustrated in Fig. 6, a plurality of blocks 2 are cast on a backing l in the same manner as above described but the ends of the unit are formed in regular step-like formation, the webbing being cut to coincide with the step-like formation at one end of the unit and being caused to project beyond the unit at the other end and at the top.

With the form of the invention shown in Fig. 8, half blocks or tiles are deposited or molded simultaneously onto the webbing from opposite sides to form a construction in which the webbing is midway between the blocks.

The units are further formed with a flat adhesive covering 4, 4a, 4b and 4c and this covering is formed of any suitable material either flexible or rigid, and preferably relatively thin, which will permit temporary sealing of the spaces 3 between the blocks. The covering may be so formed on the units that two adjacent ends will form a flap of suificient length to seal the space between the end blocks of adjacent sections when the sections are secured in position on a wall or the like.

If it is desired to have the binding material so formed that there are valleys between blocks on the finished wall a covering of the type shown at 4a in Fig. 4 may be utilized, said covering being provided with grooves which fit in the spaces between the blocks. Similarly if it is desired that the binding material appear in the form of ridges, a covering of the typeshown at 4b in Fig. 5 may be employed.

In carrying out the improved method of laying the sections, the entire unit as illustrated in Figs. 2, 6 or 7 is pressed with its mesh side rearwardly into a layer of suitable binding material when the latter is in a plastic state, the layer being preferably on the face of the surface which is to be covered, causing said material to be forced through the openings in the webbing and into the spaces between the blocks until the material contacts with the underside of the covering 4, 4a, 4b or 40. This permits a bond to be made between the back and the sides of each block and the web connecting them and between the adjacent sides of blocks of adjacent units. After the binding material has set the covering sheet 4 is removed and an unstained exterior surface results, the surface, of course, resembling the usual brick construction. If a covering sheet apart position on the while the latter is in apertured web into and above the web to the face protecting means such as that shown at 4a has been used, when it is removed the binding material will be in the form of grooves in the I ing material is in the form 4b the binding material will be in the form of ridges.

It is sometimes desirable in assembly to first take a section formed with the blocks and to through the webbing as an initial step before mounting. This will result in the front facing of the mortar joint being smooth and in the elimination of holes or unfilled points when the covering material is removed.

When a large section is being placed in position and pressed into the mortar, if the covering material is of a dense nature, some air may be trapped in the spaces between blocks and leave as an only outlet the open ends of the sections. The above may result in blow holes or pits in the front face of the mortar joints when the covering is removed. To avoid this, it is preferred to employ a covering material 4, 4a, 4b or 40 which is of such porosity as to permit the passage of air and yet prevent the passage of mortar or binding material therethrough.

The individual units shown in Fig. 7 are laid in an identical manner to the multiple block units.

With the type of unit shown in Fig. 8 either side may form the exterior surface of the wall, the covering sheet, of course, being positioned on the side selected. With the reversible unit shown in Fig. 8 one side may be formed of one color and the other side of another color making it possible for a color selection to be made.

All of the various units shown are so laid as to present a continuous brick-like appearance. The blocks may, of course, be made in the form of squares, diamonds, hexagons or the like to simulate various other types of building units.

Other changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention and all such changes are contemplated as may come within the scope of the claims.

What I claim is:

1. The method of forming siding or the like comprising providing a block of plastic material on an apertured web wherein the web extends be yond edges of the block, applying a layer of binding material to a wall or the like to be covered, and pressing the mounted blocks into spaced layer of binding material a plastic state, forcing the binding material through the apertured web into the spaces between blocks above the web and causing a union between blocks and between projecting web portions in said spaces.

2. The method of forming siding or the like comprising providing a block of plastic material on an apertured web wherein the web extends,

beyond edges of the block, securing to the face of the block to be exposed a temporary protecting means which also projects beyond the edges of the block, applying a layer of binding material to a wall or the like to be covered, pressing the mounted blocks into spaced apart position on the layer of binding material while the latter is in a plastic state and the'protecting means covering the spaces between blocks, forcing the binding material through the the spaces between blocks with projecting portions of V and causing a union between blocks and between projecting web portions in said spaces.

3. The method of forming siding or the like comprising providing a plurality of blocks of plastic material in spaced apart relation on an apertured web wherein the web extends beyond edges of the blocks, applying a layer of binding material to a wall or the like to be covered, and pressing a plurality of sets of mounted blocks into spaced apart position on the layer of binding material while the latter is ina plastic condition, forcing the binding material through the apertured web into the spaces between blocks and sets of blocks and above the web and causing a union at said spaces between the blocks and between projecting web portions.

4. The methodof forming siding or \the like comprising providing a plurality of blocks of plastic material in spaced apart relation on an apertured web wherein the web extends beyond edges of the blocks, securing to the blocks a temporary covering closing the spaces between blocks at the sides to be exposed to protect said sides during application, applying a layer of binding material to a wall or the like to be covered, pressing a plurality of sets of mounted blocks into spaced apart position on the layer of binding material while the latter is in a plastic condition, forcing the binding material through the apertured web into the spaces between blocks and sets of blocks and causing a union between the blocks and above the web to the temporary covering and. between projecting web portions in said spaces.

5. The method of forming siding or the like comprising providing a block of plastic material on an apertured web wherein the web extends beyond edges of the block, securing to the block at the side to be exposed when laid a temporary covering sheet projecting beyond edges thereof and formed to create a desired surface effect on the binding material adjacent the sides of the block when laid, applying a layer of binding material to a wall or the like to be covered, pressing the mounted blocks int'o spaced apart position on the layer of binding material while the latter is in a plastic state, forcing the binding material through the apertured web into the spaces between blocks to the covering sheet and causing a union between blocks and between projecting web portions.

6. A building unit web, a block formed of plastic material rigidly mounted on said web, and a covering sheet porous to air temporarily secured to a face of the block to be exposed and projecting beyond edges thereof, said projecting covering sheet adapted to prevent exudation of binding material to the face of the block when laid.

'7. A building unit comprising a mesh web, a block formed of plastic material rigidly mounted on said web adjacent one of its sides, and a covering sheettemporarily secured to another side of the block and projecting beyond edges thereof, said covering sheet being pervious to air and substantially impervious to a binding material when securing the unit to a base.

8. A building unit comprising an apertured web, a plurality of blocks formed of plastic material rigidly mounted on said web in spaced relation to one another, and a covering sheet temporarily secured adjacent the side of the unit to be exposed and projecting beyond edges thereof to seal the spaces between blocks, and binding material in the spaces between blocks and adjacent the covering sheet, said covering sheet preventing exudation of binding material before and during application of the unit.

9. A building unit comprising an apertured web,

comprising an apertured.

a block formed of plastic materialrigidly mounted on said web and having the web imbedded therein on one side thereof, temporarily secured to another side of the block and projecting beyond edges thereof, the web also and a covering sheet projecting beyond edges of the block but a lesser amount.

10. A reversible building unit comprising an apertured web, facing blocks formed of plastic material mounted on opposite sides of the web in coincident positions and having the web imbedded into the juncture thereof, the faces of the blocks on opposite sides of the web presenting contrasting colors.

11. A reversible building unit comprising a mesh web, facing blocks formed of plastic material with a veneer facing mounted on opposite sides of the web in coincident positions and having the web imbedded into the juncture'thereof, the faces of the blocks on opposite sides of the web presenting contrasting effects.

12. A reversible building unit comprising an apertured web, blocks formed of plastic material mounted on opposite sides of the web in coincident positions and having the web imbedded into the juncture thereof, and a covering sheet temporarily secured to the face of the block on the side to be exposed when laid and projecting beyond edges thereof, the faces of the blocks on opposite sides of the unit presenting contrasting colors.

13. A building unit comprising a plurality of blocks, apertured means in rigid connection with said blocks for holding the same in assembled spaced apart relation to one another, and means for temporarily covering one side of the unit to prevent binding material entering from another side thereof and passing through said apertured web'and into the spaces between blocks, from staining the first mentioned side.

14. A building unit comprising an apertured web, a block formed of plastic material rigidly mounted on said web, and a covering sheet temporarily secured to a face of the blockto be exposed and projecting beyond edges thereof, the projecting portions of the covering sheet being formed to create a desired surface impression on binding material applied adjacent the sides of the block.

15. A building unit comprising an apertured web, a block formed of plastic material rigidly mounted on said web, and a covering sheet temporarily secured to a face of the block to be exposed and projecting beyond edges thereof, the projecting portions of the covering sheet being formed to create surface grooves on binding material applied adjacent the sides of the block.

16. A building unit comprising an apertured web, a block formed of plastic material rigidly mounted on said web, and a covering sheet temporarily secured to a face of the block to be exposed and projecting beyond edges thereof, the projecting portions of the covering sheet being formed to create surface ridges on binding material applied adjacent the sides of the block.

1'7. A building unit comprising an apertured web, a block formed of suitable material mounted on said web, and a covering member temporarily secured to a front portion of the block and projecting beyond edges thereof, the projecting portions of the covering sheet being formed to create a desired surface effect on binding material applied adjacent the sides ofthe blocks.

18. A building unit comprising a plurality of spaced apart blocks, apertured means in 0011-. nection with one side of said blocks for maintainling definite spacing thereof, and covering means porous to air secured to an opposite portion of and web portions, and removing said covering means after the binder has set.

binding material to a wall or thereafter removing the said means also sealing applying a layer 01' the like to be covporary protecting means, the spaces between blocks,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2678896 *Feb 6, 1950May 18, 1954Glass Mosaic CorpMethod of making decorative mat coverings of the flexible sheet type
US3067545 *Dec 12, 1957Dec 11, 1962Gaines Richard MArtificial siding for frame buildings
US3077059 *Oct 31, 1958Feb 12, 1963Robert K StoutBrick veneer construction material
US3171772 *Apr 27, 1961Mar 2, 1965Skanska Cementgjuteriet AbReinforced plastic covering plate
US3319392 *Jun 18, 1964May 16, 1967Tile Council Of AmericaFlexible ceramic file unit
US3332187 *Dec 11, 1963Jul 25, 1967Brix CorpBrick wall panel and method of making
US3340660 *Dec 11, 1963Sep 12, 1967Brix CorpBrick wall panel and method of making same
US3411257 *Mar 28, 1966Nov 19, 1968Yaremchuk GeorgeStructure for and method of bricklaying
US3426490 *Dec 23, 1966Feb 11, 1969Bric Wall Mfg Co IncMasonry veneer siding and mold
US4406099 *Jun 18, 1980Sep 27, 1983Barrett Lawrence GUnitized floor panel and method of laying the same
US4543765 *Jul 14, 1983Oct 1, 1985Barrett Lawrence GUnitized floor panel and method of laying the same
US4573299 *Nov 3, 1983Mar 4, 1986Forbo-Teppichwerk AgFloor covering article
US4662140 *Sep 30, 1985May 5, 1987Ronald B. LosseBrick support structure
US4947600 *May 22, 1989Aug 14, 1990Porter William HBrick wall covering
US5125204 *May 14, 1990Jun 30, 1992Porter William HSnap-in panel mounting arrangement
US5398472 *Feb 19, 1993Mar 21, 1995The Shandel GroupFiber-bale composite structural system and method
US8256178 *Apr 30, 2008Sep 4, 2012Flexbrick, S.L.Flexible brick plate for building architectural elements, and method for manufacturing said plate
US20110047914 *Apr 30, 2008Mar 3, 2011Flexbrick, S.L.Flexible sheet of bricks for construction of architectural elements, and method for manufacture of said sheet
US20110268502 *Jul 18, 2011Nov 3, 2011Kurtzman Stephen CRubber landscape paver having opposing patterned surfaces
WO1987002088A1 *Sep 29, 1986Apr 9, 1987William H PorterBrick support structure
WO2008139008A1 *Apr 30, 2008Nov 20, 2008Espanola De Fabricantes De LadFlexible sheet of bricks for construction of architectural elements, and method for manufacture of said sheet
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/388, 52/311.1, 52/745.1
International ClassificationB28B23/00, E04F13/14
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/147, B28B23/0012
European ClassificationB28B23/00B, E04F13/14J