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Publication numberUS1994685 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1935
Filing dateJun 27, 1933
Priority dateNov 9, 1932
Publication numberUS 1994685 A, US 1994685A, US-A-1994685, US1994685 A, US1994685A
InventorsCallejas Roger Fernandez
Original AssigneeCallejas Roger Fernandez
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mechanical baseball game
US 1994685 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 19, 1935. R CALLEJAS 1,994,685

MECHANICAL BASEBALL GAME Filed June 27, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 x Q J W 119, 1935. R CALLEJAS MECHANICAL BASEBALL GAME Filed June 27, 1933 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 i at E: 5i WW M W f \Nb PM$\ m Q .L

W Q w w w m: 3

March 19, 1935. A E A 1,994,685

MECHANI CAL BASEBALL GAME] Filed June 27, 193:5 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 f atented Mar. 19, 193

7 oa rsosrATEs PATENT tim ,MEcnANioAL BASEBALL" GAME Roger Fernande z 'Oalleias, Habana, Cuba Application June'2h1933, Serial No. 677,917

In Cuba November 9, 1932- 8 Claims. (Cl. 273 438) and which is so constructedthat'the playing of the game will require judgment and skill upon part of the players andin this manner create. an exciting interest in the game. I

The invention also aims to provide certain inrproved features rendering thedevice capable of more closely realizing the fine points and technical phases of a real baseball game, such, for instance, as the pitching arrangement which is adapted to impart difierenttypes of pitch balls, '1. e., plate, in -sho'ot, out-shoot, orcurved balls; the hitting arrangement which makes it possible to bat right or left handedythe ball receiving arrangement which registers either the strike or ball,'dependent upon whether thepitched ball passes over or outside the home plate.

Other important features and advantages of the invention will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereinafter. I r

In order that the invention and its mode *of operation may be readily understood by those personsskilled inthe art, I have in the accompanying drawings and in the detailed description based thereupon, set out aipossible embodiment of the same. a

In these drawings:

Figure l is a top plan of the device,

Figure 2 is a top View with the playing board removed,

Figure 3 is a section taken ure 1,

Figure 4 is an enlarged on line 3--3 of Figsectional detail taken from a portion'of Figure, 3,

Figure 5 isa diagrammatic illustration of the at right-angles f struction of the lever used for pitching the ball,

and

.. Figure 9 is a face elevation of the ball receiving arrangement shown on anen-larged-scale.

Having more particular reference to thedrawingswherein like characters of reference. will designate corresponding parts throughout, my improved device maybe stated to comprise a playing tableiindicated in its entirety for convenience and clarity herein by the reference character 10, and which is preferably provided with legs 11 supporting a playing board-120i" substantially square configuration. Disposed in one corner of the playing board 12 andreproduced thereon, is a baseball diamond l3 with first, second and third base, home plate and pitchersbox The diamond may be painted orotherwise outlined upon the surface of the playing board and so arranged that the home plate will be'nearest to the aforesaid corner of the board. It will be understoodthat there maining portion of theplaying board,'-as indicated at 14 will represent the outfield.

Secured to the two sides of the-playing board 12 defining the outfield portion 14' thereof, is a fence-"like arrangement consisting of relatively spaced; posts 15 provided slots 16 wherein are slid'a'bly' and removably received boards or the like 1'7 upon which may be shown advertising matter much in the manner usually done on fences enclosing baseball grounds. Upon the remaining two sides of the playing board 12 are provided upstanding flanges 18 forming a stopping border on that section of the playing board Positioned on each side of the home plate and formed to extend through the playing board 12 is a pair of holes 19 adapted to removably receive a spindle 20 carrying a bat 21. That .the bat may be held more steadily in position; a block 22 is affixed to the underside of the playing board, which block is provided with a bore 23 registering with the hole 19 in the board. By reason of the construction of the batting arrangement, .it will be appreciated that the bat 21 maybe positioned at will, on either side of the home plate so that the bat may be spun in a manner simulating a right or left handed batter.

'As more clearly shown in Figures 3, 6 and 7, at

the pitchers box, the playing board 12 "is cut through to provide an elongated recess 24 covered by a hinged plate 25 normally urged in closed position by means of a coil spring 26 having one extremity attached to said plate and its other extremity to an adjacent portion of the board12 preferably as indicated at 2'7 and 28 respectively.

' Suitably secured to the playing board 1 2"at ,'the

forward end of the recess 24 and depending therefrom, is a hollow shaft 29 providedwith internal longitudinal grooves 30. A ball lifter or blvating member 31 is mounted within the shaft 29 to slide up and down therein, said lifter or member being provided with a pair of outwardly projecting ribs 32 fitting in the grooves 30 and cooperating therewith to guide the lifter 31 in its movement. It will be understood that normally the lifter 31, due to its own weight, will fall by gravity to the lower end of the shaft 29. However, to limit the fall of said lifter 31, a cord 33 is attached to one side of the same and is of such a length that the ball lifter 31 will be arrested at a predetermined position at the lower portion of the shaft 29. The cord 33 is passed outwardly of the shaft 29 at the upper portion thereof, as more clearly shown at 34 in Figure '7 of the drawings, guided over a pulley 34' mounted upon the underside of the playing board 12. The free end of the cord 33 projects through one side of the playing table end and is provided with a knob or the like 35, so that the cord may be pulled thus causing the lifter 31 to rise in the shaft 29 and'extend through the recess 24. 1 I

In order to maintain the ball lifter 'orelevating member 31 in its elevated positionparing ,36 is provided at the top portion of the shaft 29 and urged by means of a spring 37 to extend within said shaft through a slot 38 out therein. The extending edge of the ring 36 is adapted for engagement with a recess 39 formed'in'the lower end of the lifter, whereby to lock the latter at the top of- .the shaft. It willappear from the drawings more particularly Figure 6 thereof, the head portion of the lifter 31 isfornied with a cup depression 40 so that the ball P may seatitself therein. The ball P is. further retained upon the lifter 31 by means of a recess block 41 secured in'place uponthe under sideof the hinged plate 25. At this point, it is to be noted that when the lifter 31 carrying the ball P is raised, said ball will come in contact with the recess block 41 and through the continuedmovement of said lifter, the hinged plate will be forced open,,thei spring 26 acting to clamp the ball inbetween the opposed surfaces of the lifter 31 and block 41. v

Disposed rearwardly and to one side of the shaft 29 adjacent the recess 24 in the playing board. 12,

is a sleeve 42 wherein is slidably and pivotally suspended an inverted L-shaped lever 43, the horizontal arm of which is provided with a hammer-like portion 44 terminating with a cushion tip 45. As illustrated in the drawings, the arm of the lever 43 is longer than its supporting sleeve 42 and consequently, it will be understood that said lever may be slidably adjusted in the direction indicated by the arrows A in Figure 8. For this purpose, the opposed ends of the aforementioned arm are formed with eyelets 46, to one of which is attached a lengthof cord 47 connected by means of a turnbuckle 48 to a tension spring 49 fastened to the undersideof the playing board 12 by a suitable element such asa screw eye 50. The tension of the spring 49' may be regulated through the turnbuckle 48 to exert the required pull upon the lever 43. To the remaining eyelet 46 of the lever arm 43' isattached-another length of cord 51 the free end of whicnis fixed to a controlling handle 52 pivoted bymeanspf a screw or the like 53 to the playing board 12.

Due to this arrangement, it will be appreciated that the lever 43 may be moved by manipulation of the handle 53, to bring the cushion tip 45 of the hammer-like portion 44, opposite any point of the adjacent surface of the ballP when the latter is held in elevatedposition by the lifter 31.. Because of this feature, when the hammer-like portion44 strikes the ball in the manner to be later described, diiferent types of ball may be pitched such as a straight, in-shoot, out-shoot or curved ball,

depending upon the adjustment of the lever 43.

The lower extremity of the vertical arm of the inverted L-shaped lever'43, preferably asshown,

is provided with an eyelet 54 to which is attached a pair of cords 55 and 56 respectively. The cord,

55 is stretched forwardly of the lever 43 and connected to a spring-5'7 acting to normally urge said lever in the directionof the arrow R and hold the same in a slanted position in the manner shown in full lines in Figure 3 and in dotted lines in Fig ure 6 of the-drawings, so that the'hammer-like portion 44.is nested within the recess 24 of the playing board 12 permitting the closure of the cover plate 25. The cord 56 in which is interposed an equalizing spring 58, is passed over a pulley or the like 59 and brought and secured to' a controlling trigger 60 pivoted to the playing board in the manner described in connection with the lever position controlling handle 52. It will be understood that upon pulling the, trigger 60,

the cord 56 will be jerked inthe direction of-ar-' row J swinging the lever 43 and causing the hammer-likehead 44 to hit the ball P, thus forcing the latterv to roll over the playing board towards the home plate, to be struck at by the bat 21.

It is to be-noted that the hammer-like portion 44 of the lever 43 is formed with a boss 61 adapt,- ed, upon swinging, saidlever, to come in contact 1 with the lifter locking ring 36 and knock it out of engagement with the lifter 31, so that the latter is free to fall almost simultaneouslywith .the hitting of the ball P;

Since the lever 43 is to be, released immediately upon hitting the ball, it will be understoodthat said lever willbe quickly returned toits normal position within the. recess 24 by action of; the

spring 5'7, whereupon the cover plate 5 25, will snap back. toclosing position leavingjthe field unobstructed'should the pitched ball be-struck' at and hit outfield over the surface ofthe playing board 12.

Scattered throughout thev surfaceof the play-- ing board 12 both in the diamond outline 13 and These apertures, itwillbe will be indicated in the manner to be hereinafter described. Hingedto'the underside of the playing board 12 and arranged to normally close the bottom of the apertures 62 are trap doors 64 each carrying an angularly' bent finger. 65 projecting into the corresponding aperture 62.' 'In this connection, it will be understood that when the ball P falls into one of the apertures.62,

the weight of said ball will cause the door 64. to drop thus allowing the ball to pass throughr Cords, wires, or the like 66 are attached to each door at a point diametrically oppositeto the hinged-portion thereof andguided throughlsc'rew eyes, pulleys'or the like 67. These cords or the like 66 lead to the sides of the playing table 10 as indicated at 68, where they may be manually pulled to reset the doors 64 after they havebeen depressed by the batted ball falling in the play indicating-apertures 62. Y I

For the purpose of indicating the play, an elecQ trical scoreboard 69 is mounted upon a suitable portion of the playing table 10, which scoreboard 69embodies a pluralityot lamps 70 eachindi- F eatinge particular may and in 'the circuit of which, as illustrated in Figure 4, 'are interpo'sed the trap doors-54.- In this manner, it will appear manifest that the ball P falling in 'the aperture 62 will come to rest uponthe finger 65, which is preferably made of spring metal, and displace the same to touchthe contact ,"71 mounted upon an adjacent portion of the trap door',thus closing the circuit and illuminating the lamps '70. Of course, after the ball has left the finger 65in passing through as above pointed out, the latter will automatically break the contact thus opening the circuit tothe lamp 70. V

Arranged over the sides of the playing board 12, defining the outfield portion thereoffjand slightly projectingthereover,,are eaves '72ffrom which are swingably suspended plaques '73 each having a definitelindication thereon fsuchias Foul, Home run, o tmrrwopase hit, 6130., sothat if a batted ball rolls over the apertures 62 without falling therein; "it 'willflhit one, of said plaques and [swing the same'rearwardly letting tlie'ball pass but indicating the play, made. I The play is also indicated upon fthefelectricalscoreboard. 69 -and for this purpose, a contactpoint '74 is placed onthe plaque 73 and adaptedwhenthe latter is swung in opposition, tov bear: upon spring contact ',7 5.Y Ihe se contactsj'm and '75 are in circuit with the'appropriate lamps of the scoreboard 69 so that the play appears thereon.

Each plaque is further provided with a rearwardly and upwardly extendingarcuate arm '76 passing through an opening 77 in said eaves '72. A spring actuated catch '78 is mounted upon the underside of the eaves '72 and disposed to engage a notch '79 on said finger to maintain the swinging plaque in up position.-

The plaques '73 may be manually reset by means of cords 80 in the manner described with refer-v ence to the surface aperture trap doors, but it is preferred to reset the plaques '73 electrically, as illustrated in Figure 5, wherein a coil 81 capable of being energized by the closing of a switch 82 to attract a pivoted lever 83 to which is connected the cord 80 controlling the rings '78. It will be understood that when the cord 80 is pulled, the rings '78 will be displaced to disengage the arm '76 of the plaques '73 whereupon the latter may return to their original suspended position.

Disposed in back of the home plate, is a ball receiving arrangement comprising a box-like body 84 having an open front 85 facing the home plate. A set of three swingingly suspended plaquesv '73 normally close the open front 85 of said body 84. It will appear from the drawings, that these plaques '73 with their arcuate arms '76 and looking rings 78' are similar in construction and operation to the plaques 73 bordering the outfield of the playing board.- I

Of the set of three plaques '73, the intermediate one is positioned in alinement with the home plate and intended to indicate a strike, whereas the side plaques are disposed out of alinement with the home plate and intended to indicate -a ball. Consequently, it will be appreciated, that if a batter fails to swing at the pitched ball and the latter passes over the plate, the ball will be received in the receiving arrangement through the intermediate plaque thus indicating a call strike, but if the pitched ball passes outside the home plate, it will be received through the side plaques thus indicating a ball.

In order to return the ball to the pitchers box after each play, an inclined false bottom 86 is constructed beneath the playing board 12. The

false bottom 86 is made to converge-towards the V shaft 29 an'd'is provided withchannels 8'7 leading to said shaft. At the point where the channels 87 meet the shaft 29, there are out in thelatter,

openings 88 wherebytheball B may enter said shaftand seatits'elf'upon the elevating member 3l-to-be subsequently raisedto pitching position in themanne'r hereinbefore set fiirth, Asshown, passageways 89 and 90 are formed in the play ing board'lz to permit the ball, after passing the plaques73 or '73; to roll down the inclined false bottom 86-into the channels 8'7; and to the shaft 29.

"The operation of my improved device'will be clearly understood from-the foregoing description. It may beadded, however, that in use-the ball goby,and in' that event, ifthe' yballjis re-' ceived through the strike indicating portion of the receiving arrangement, a strike will be called against the batter, but if the ball enters the receiving arrangement through the ball portion thereof, then a ball will be counted for the batter.

Manifestly, the construction shown and described is capable of many modifications, and those modifications which come within the scope of the claims I consider within the spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. In a baseball game apparatus, a playing board, a ball elevating member arranged under said board, means for raising said member to support the ball above the surface of the playing board, means for locking said member in its raised position, a lever pivoted to said board and having a hammer-like portion adapted to knock the ball off its elevating support to simulate a itched ball, and means for releasing said looking means simultaneously with the knocking of the ball by said lever.

2. In a baseball game apparatus, a playing board, a hollow shaft depending from said board, a ball el vating member slidable up and down in said shaft, means for raising said member within the shaft to support the ball above the surface of the playing board, and means pivoted to the board and operable to knock the ball oif its elevating support to simulate a pitched ball.

3. In a baseball game apparatus, a playing board, a hollow shaft depending from said board,

a ball elevating member slidable up and down in said shaft, means for raising said member to support the ball above the surface of the playing board, spring actuated means engageable with said member for locking the same at the upper portion of the shaft, a lever pivoted to the board and having a hammer-like portion adapted to knock the ball off its elevating support to simulate a pitched ball, and means on said lever for releasing said locking means simultaneously with the knocking of the ball by said lever.

4. In a baseball game apparatus, a playing board, a hollow shaft depending from said board,

a ball elevating member slidable up and down within said shaft, means for raising said member to support the ball above the" surface of the playing-board, spring actuated means engageable with said member for locking the same in;its raised position, a lever pivoted to said board and having a hammer-like portion adapted to knock the ball of its elevating support to simulate a pitched ball, means formed on said lever and adapted. to contact with said locking means simultaneously with the knocking of the ball by said lever for releasing the member whereby the latter may return to the lower portion of, the shaft, and means for leading the ball to the lower portion of the shaft for engagement with said elevating member.

5. .In abaseball game apparatus, a playing board,-a ball elevatingmember arranged under said board, means for raising said member to support the ball above the surface of the playing board, a lever pivoted to said board and having a'hamm'er-like portion adapted to knock the ball ofi its elevating support to simulate a pitched ball, and means for, adjusting said lever with relation to the ball.

6. In a baseball game apparatus, a playing board, a ball elevating member arranged under said board, means for raisingsaid member to support the ball above the surface "of the playing board, a lever pivoted to the board and having a hammer-like portion adapted to knock the ball off its elevating Support to simulate apitehed ball, means for adjusting said lever in-relation to the ball, manually controlled;means, fer regu lating said adjusting means, and other manila-1, controlled means for operating said lever to knee}; 1-;

the ball, v ,7 U

7. In a baseball game apparatus, a; playing board, means for pitching the ballover said board, means for hitting the pitched ball over the the board, plaques swingablysuspended over a'i portion of said board andarranged to swing upwardly when hit by a batted ball, means associated' with saidplaques to lock the same injup position, means for releasing said' locking means whereby said plaques may return I to extended position, an electrical-scoreboard, and contact means operable to close the circuit to said score board when said plaques are inup position. j

ROGER FERNANDEVZ' cALLEJAs'i

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2448837 *Jun 27, 1945Sep 7, 1948Siberts Carl EdwinBaseball game
US3534962 *Feb 14, 1968Oct 20, 1970Alfred H SinglemanBaseball game with manually batted disk
US3706454 *Mar 24, 1971Dec 19, 1972Joseph ParlatoSimulated baseball game
US3814425 *Jul 26, 1972Jun 4, 1974B KanefieldBall game device
US3985358 *Sep 15, 1975Oct 12, 1976Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc.Simulated baseball game
US4116442 *Aug 12, 1977Sep 26, 1978Dickey George WSimulated baseball game
US4179123 *May 30, 1978Dec 18, 1979Mitsuo TsukudaBaseball game board
US4260153 *Dec 18, 1979Apr 7, 1981Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc.Game incorporating an inclined ramp in a ball launching mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/108.31
International ClassificationA63F7/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/0608
European ClassificationA63F7/06A1