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Publication numberUS1994876 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1935
Filing dateFeb 18, 1932
Priority dateNov 5, 1929
Publication numberUS 1994876 A, US 1994876A, US-A-1994876, US1994876 A, US1994876A
InventorsKonrad Hebbel, Wilhelm Schneider
Original AssigneeAgfa Ansco Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Photographic film free from halation
US 1994876 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 19, 1935. w. SCHNEIDER Er AL PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM FREE FROM HALATIONv Filed Feb. 1a,4 1952 ln venfors.-

lPatented 'Marr l-9, 1935 l r UNITED STATES ineTlazllT or'F1cE-- r Wilhelm Schneider, Dessau in Anhalt, and Konrad Hebbel, Wolfen, near Bitterfeld, Germany, assignors to Agfa Ansco Corporation, Binghamton, N. Y., a corporation o! New York A Application February 18, 1932, Serial No. 593,918 IneGermany November 5, 1929 6 Claims. (Cl. 95-9)` Our` present invention relates. to new photo- Schultz Farbstoiltabellen, Vel edition No. 524) graphic lms and more particularly to films free giving a bluish red color, 3.4-dimethoxy-styrylfrom halation. It is a continuation in part of our quinoline-dimethylsulfate of the formula copending application Ser. No. 491,619, tiled October 27, 1930. The object of our present invention is to provide a photographic illlnl free from halation havf ing applied to its back side an intermediate layer swellable in water or in aqueous solutions, said CH: $04031 CH" lo intermediate layer bearing the proper anti-halagiving a yellow color and 4 dimelmylmnino.`10y A tion layer. Further objectswill beseen from the styryl quinoline dimethylsulfate giving a red detailed Speeneaton following hereafter color. The color of the dyes incorporated in the We have found that the Support 0f e nlm Canyintermediate layer is preferablyv chosen in such a ing on one of its faces a light sensitive emulsion manner as to cover the gapsoi absorption of the layer is Protected from being nndesnably colored proper anti-halation layer as far as the light senwhen Providing an anti-bami@ 0n il back Side sitive emulsion .is sensitive te the waves of. these by applying the said anti-halation layer not digaps. i rectly to the support, but to an intermediate layer The `following examples illustrate. our invenof any material which swells in water or in aquetion; f ous solutions, for instance, the photographic Example.1 .To a nitrocellulose film as used for 20 baths. Such swellable materials adapted for the photographic materials, there is applied in known Preparation of an intermediate layer are gelatin manner a very thin layer which maybe made from albuminous substances or casein rendered insolua Solution of ble in waterby a treatment with hardening agents but still remaining sweuable, cellulosev etners Gewi 60 grams 25 swellable in water or the like, The thickness of Glycerol T 150 cc. the `intermediate layer may vary within wide Glacial acetic acid. 20 cc. limits. Water 150 cc.

For example we may provide on the support a Metnannl 2000 eej gelatin layer of about 1 p. thickness made in the Acetone 7000 cc. 30

Seme manner es the Subeeatng for a light Sensi' In order to obtain a nlm entirely free from halative emulsion layer, or we may use athicker intertion, this layer may after drying be colored by mediate layer up t0 about' 30 l by applying t0 the bathing the nlm in an aqueous solution of a dye Sub-coating e usuel non'eln'llng' leyel'- These which does not tend to -color the support, fOr inlayers are applied t0 the Support according to stance, in an aqueous solution of methyl blue.- 35 v known metnods- When the intermediate layer is dry, an antiehala- The enti'nelaten layer propel" Comprising one tion layer of 0.5 to 1 p. thickness, obtained from dye or a mixture of several dyes with or without a' solution containing 50o .gi-ams -oi' urine the use of a. binding agnt, is applied to the inter- 40 mediate layer' The anti'llalation dyes which we and 10 liters of alcohol is applied thereon. 'Ihe prefer are those soluble 1n alkaline liquids andammala/cion layer thus prepared has a smooth capable of forming a coherent smooth layer when surface and can be removed Within a short time cast from which no particles split off. Such dyes m the usual photographic developers. are for Instance the fuchsopes and the fuchfson Example 2.-A support of cellulose acetate is in 45 imides A e known manner provlded with a sub-coating. T0 I f deslrd for rendermg the .photographic ma' the support thus prepared there is applied a nontenal entirely free from halation, when using a t 1 ku t mixture of dyes one or more of the dyes-which do, curlmg layer made from a Solution o however not tend to permanently colo-r the mm gelatin in 9 liters of water to which 100 cc oi a may be 'incorporated in the intermediate layer. solution of chrome alum have been added. This'. 50 Appropriated for this purpose are, for instance, 'Solution in which tllele are dSSOlVed 2-10 grams methyl` blue (see sehu1tz, rarbsteirtabeuen, vih. 0f methyl blue per kllo 1s apphed at a temperature edition No. 53'?) givinga blue color, alkali blue of about 35 C. in a manner as to obtain a uni- (see Schultz, Farbstoitabellen, Vth edition No. iorm gelatin layer of the desired thickness of say 536) likewise giving a blue color, acid tuchsin (see 20 to 25 n. After the intermediate non-curling 65 (Schultz, rarbstefrtabeuen, vih edition, No. 555) 4b Example 2 with the diierence that the solution for preparing the intermediate layer contains 2 to 10 grams of acid fuchsin per kilo andthat the proper anti-halation layer is made from a solution Y of 1 kilo of benzaurine in l0 liters of propanol.

Example 4.-The conditions are the same as in Example 2 with the difference that'the solution for preparing the intermediate layer contains l to 5 grams of 4-dimethylamino-styryl-quinolinedimethylsulfate per kilo and that the proper antihalation layer is made from a solution of 750 grams of aurine-tri-carboxylic-acid in 10 liters of isobutanol.

Example 5.-The conditions are the same as in Example 2 with the difference that the solution for preparing the intermediate layer contains v1 to 5 grams of 3.4-dimethoxy-styryl-quinoline-dimethylsulfate and that the proper anti-halation layer is made from a solution of 250 grams of oxytolylamlnofuchsoncarboxylic acid in 10 liters of propanol.

Example 6.-'I'he conditions are the same as in Example 5 with the difference the proper antihalation layer is made from a solution of 1 kilo of fuchsin-tri-carboxylic-acid in 10 liters of alco- Inthe accompanying drawing a photographic nlm is shown in cross section and on an enlarged scale, illustrating the peculiar features of our invention.

In this drawing a is the photographic emulsion applied to the emulsion carrier, b, consisting, for instance, of nitrocellulose ivate, c is the intermediate layer swellable in water or in the photographic baths. d is the antihalation layer.

Qur present invention is not limited to the foregoing examples nor to the specinc details given therein. Intermediate layers made from other substances than those mentioned are possible comprising one or more strata. 'I'hese layers may be dyed with dyestuils having no amnity to the illm support; or they may be used undyed according to the purpose in question. 'Ihese dyes must furthermore have the property of being removable or decolorized in the photographic baths preferably in the alkaline developer in such a manner that the intermediate layer will remain colorless regardless of any further treatment. The I proper anti-halation layer may be made from any dye that will form a coherent layer from which particles do not split olf and which layer is sol- .uble in the photographic baths. The thickness of the intermediate layer and of the anti-halation layer may vary within wide limits and is to be to the desired purpose. A few simple experiments will be sumcient to determine in each particular case the best conditions and tbe most suitable amount of dyestuil' to be used. Other embodiments than those given in the exor another cellulose derv oline-dimethyl-suli'a ,swellable in amples are possible and we contemplate as included within our invention all such modifications as fall within the scope of the appended claims.-

What we claim isz- 1. A yphotographic film free from halation and comprising an emulsion carrier consisting of cellulosic material coated on one side with a photographic emulsion and on the other side'with an intermediate layer swellable in aqueous solutions or in water, and on the outer surface of said intermediate layer an anti-halation dye soluble in feebly alkaline baths but insoluble in water.

2. .VA photographic film free from halation and comprising an emulsion carrier consisting of cellulosicV material coated on one side with a photographic emulsion and on the other side with an -intermediate layer consisting of a material swellable in aqueous solutions or. in water and on the outer surface of said intermediate layer an antihalation layer soluble in feebly alkaline baths but insoluble in water.

3. A photographic lm free from halation and comprising an emulsion carrier consisting of cellulosic material coated on one side with a photographic emulsion and on the other side with an intermediate layer consisting of a material swellable in aqueous solutions or in water and in which is incorporated an anti-halation dye having no aillnity for dyeing permanently the cellulosic material, and on the outer surface of said intermediate layer an anti-halation layer soluble in feebly alkaline baths but insoluble in water.

4. A photographic film free from halation and comprising an emulsion carrier consisting of al cellulosic material coated on one side with a photographic emulsion and on the other side with an intermediate layer consisting of a. material swellable in aqueous solutions or in water and which is dyed with methyl blue, and on the outer surface of the intermediate layer an anti-halation layer comprising aurine. v

5. A photographic film free from halation and comprising an emulsion carrier consisting of a. cellulosic material coated on one side with a photographic emulsion and on the other side with an intermediate layer consisting of a material swellable in aqueous solutions which is dyed with 4-dlmethylamino-styryl-quinand on the outer surface of the intermediate layer an anti-halation layer comprising aurine-tri-carboxylic-acid.

6. A photographic nlm i'ree from halation and comprising an emulsion carrier consisting of a cellulosic material coated on one side with a photographic emulsion and on the other side with an intermediate layer consisting of 'a material aqueoussolutions or in water and which is dyed with 3.4-dimethoxy-styryl-quinoline-dimethylsulfate, and on the outer surface of the intermediate layer an anti-halation layer comprising oxytolylaminoiuchsoncarboxylic acid.

scHNEmER. KONRAD HEBBEL.

or in water and

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4215030 *Aug 30, 1978Jul 29, 1980Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Photographic polyester film support
US4258118 *Dec 26, 1979Mar 24, 1981Polaroid CorporationNovel xanthene compounds and photographic products and processes employing the same
US4258119 *Dec 26, 1979Mar 24, 1981Polaroid CorporationNovel xanthene compounds and photographic products and processes employing the same
US4282160 *May 22, 1980Aug 4, 1981Polaroid CorporationNovel triarylmethane compounds
US4283538 *Dec 26, 1979Aug 11, 1981Polaroid CorporationNovel triarylmethane compounds
US4290950 *May 30, 1980Sep 22, 1981Polaroid CorporationSulfo-substituted-3,6-di(N-indolinyl)-9-sulfonamidophenyl-xanthenes
US4290951 *May 30, 1980Sep 22, 1981Polaroid Corporation3,6-Di(N-indolinyl)-9-sulfonamidophenyl-xanthenes
US4290955 *May 30, 1980Sep 22, 1981Polaroid Corporation3,6-Di(alkyl/phenyl)amino-9-carboxamidophenyl-xanthenes
US4304833 *May 22, 1980Dec 8, 1981Polaroid CorporationPhotographic products and processes employing triarylmethane compounds
US4310673 *Oct 6, 1980Jan 12, 1982Polaroid CorporationXanthene compounds
US4311847 *Oct 6, 1980Jan 19, 1982Polaroid CorporationXanthene compounds
US4316950 *Dec 26, 1979Feb 23, 1982Polaroid CorporationNovel xanthene compounds and photographic products and processes employing the same
US4416971 *Dec 28, 1982Nov 22, 1983Polaroid CorporationNovel xanthene compounds and their photographic use
US5006450 *Nov 15, 1989Apr 9, 1991Eastman Kodak CompanyMordant polymer photographic element containing
US5077187 *Oct 4, 1990Dec 31, 1991Eastman Kodak CompanyPhotographic elements silver halide containing a specific polymer and water soluble dye layer
US5187282 *Apr 8, 1991Feb 16, 1993Polaroid CorporationSulfonated xanthene dyes, and photographic products and processes employing these dyes
US5264322 *Apr 28, 1992Nov 23, 1993Polaroid CorporationSulfonated xanthene dyes, and photographic products and processes employing these dyes
US7727680 *Mar 22, 2006Jun 1, 2010Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd.Hologram recording sheet, holographic optical element using said sheet, and its production process
Classifications
U.S. Classification430/514, 430/517, 430/522
International ClassificationG03C1/825, G03C1/76
Cooperative ClassificationG03C1/76, G03C1/825
European ClassificationG03C1/825, G03C1/76