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Publication numberUS1994903 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1935
Filing dateJan 6, 1931
Priority dateJan 6, 1931
Publication numberUS 1994903 A, US 1994903A, US-A-1994903, US1994903 A, US1994903A
InventorsRalph Warrender
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric & Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radiator and method of making the same
US 1994903 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Marcli 19, 1935. R. WARRENDER 1,994,903

RADIATOR AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed Jan. 6, 1931 a L 7 ATFORNEY Patented Mar. 19, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE RADIATOR ANDMETHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Application January 6, 1931, Serial No. 506,914

6 Claims.

My invention relates to heat radiators and it has particular relation to heat radiators adapted for use with electrical apparatus, such as transformers.

In the operation of electrical apparatus, such as transformers, induction regulators or the like, the apparatus is contained in a tank or casing and immersed in a bath of insulating and cooling fluid, such as oil. The oil insulates the various parts of the apparatus from one another, and, by circulation and conduction, transfers the heat generated in the apparatus to the walls of the tank'through which it is dissipated to the outside atmosphere, thus protecting the apparatus from injury.

It is frequently desirable, especially in relatively large transformers, to increase the cooling capacity of the transformer tank by the provision of heat-conducting radiators or coolers, thus providing a large cooling area in contact with the outside atmosphere. One general type of radiator for cooling purposes is provided with top and bottom header members or conduits, connected to the transformer tank and between which vertical risers are connected to permit the oil to flow between the two header members, which,in turn, receive oil from, and deliver oil to, the transformer tank. A plurality of such radiators may be attached to a transformer tank.

An object of my invention is to provide a cheap and efficient form of radiator which is of light weight, is leak proof and which, when completed, has no joints between the parts thereof.

Another object of my invention is to provide a radiator that may be formed of blown up or inflated riser sections welded together and to single-piece header members attached to their ends and in fluid-conducting relation thereto.

My invention will be better understood by referring to the following description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a view, partially in section and partially in elevation, of a finished radiator unit showing one manner of mounting.

Fig. 2 is a front elevational view of a finished radiator unit adapted for radial mounting.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken along the line III--III of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a front elevational view of a portion of a finished radiator unit adapted for tangential mounting. I

Fig. 5 is a horizontal sectional view showing the side plates of a rising section before they are shaped to form a fluid-conducting member.

header contemplated by my Fig. 6 is a horizontal sectional view showing the side plates of a riser section after they have been pressed or inflated to the desired shape.

Fig. '7 is an enlargement of a portion of the structure shown in Fig. 1.

Referring to Fig. 1 of the drawing, a radiator unit 1 is illustrated as comprising a plurality of risers or fluid-conducting members 2 that are attached, at the top and bottom, to header sections 3. The riser sections may be formed in the general way described in the copending application of John G. Ritter for Receptacles, Serial No. 249,193, filed January 24, 1928 and assigned to the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company.

Such fluid-conducting members 2 are formed from flat steel plates 4, of relatively thin material, having, in general, a rectangular form. The plates 4 are welded together at their edges, as shown at 7, and are spot or line welded along a portion of theirintermediate surfaces, as shown at 8. The plates 4 are .welded together, while the plates are fiat, as shown in Fig. 5, and, after the completion of the welding operation, are infiated by means of compressed air, or the like. to their final configuration, as shown in Fig. 6. After each riser section is formed, the ends of the plates are sheared, and a tool is inserted between the ends of the pair of plates which causes them to be bent, as at 5, and turned up at 6, the end portion 6 being substantially parallel to the wall 4 of the riser section. After the formation of the riser sections, they are placed adjacent to each other, with their turned up portions -6 abutting, and are welded together along their abutting edges, thus attaching the adjae cent riser sections together.

Trough-shaped members 11 are provided to cooperate with the ends of the riser sections to form the lateral connecting conduits 3. The edges of the members 11 are welded to the bent portions 5 of the riser members along the line of contact 12. 1

Flange members 13 are welded to the headers 3 to form radiator parts that connect to the tank through the elbows 14. In another form of invention and adapted for radial mounting, the flanges 13 may be attached directly to the tank, without employing elbows, as shown in Fig. 2. In Fig. 4 is shown another form of header that may be employed for mounting the radiator section tangentially to the transformer tank.

It will be noted that, in the construction hereinbefore set forth, the parts are so arranged that all of the welds are made on the outside surface of the radiator. Consequently, they are easily accessible and may be economically made, thereby effecting a considerablereduction in the cost of manufacturing and maintaining the radiator. There are no depressed surfaces to form pockets for the retention of water, thus preventing corrosion and leaks in the radiator.

Since many modifications in. the construction illustrating my invention may be made without departing from the spirit thereof, I do not wish to be limited otherwise than by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A heat-radiating unit comprising a plurality of fluid-conducting riser sections disposed in substantially parallel relation and formed from a pair of plates welded together at their peripheries, a portion adjacent to the ends of said plates being disposed substantially at right angles to the risers to form flat surfaces, the end portions being further bent inwardly to form flat surfaces parallel to the section, said last named surfaces of adjacent sections abutting each other and being welded together, and trough-like members welded to the ends of a plurality of riser sections to form connecting conduits, all of said welds being on the exterior surface of said radiator.

2. A heat-radiating unit comprising a plurality of fluid-conducting riser sections disposed in substantially parallel relation and formed from a pair of plates welded together at their peripheries, a portion adjacent to the ends of said plates being bent to form flat surfaces at. right angles to the risers, the extreme end portions of said plates being bent to form flat surfaces parallel to the riser sections, said last named surfaces of adjacent sections abutting each other and being welded together, troughlike members welded to the end portions of the sections to form headers, all of said welds being on the exterior surface of the radiator.

. 3. A heat-radiating unit comprising a plurality of fluid-conducting members arranged in substantially parallel relation, the ends of each member being bent away from the center thereof and inwardly to form flat surfaces parallel to the member, the flat surfaces of adjacent members abutting each other and being welded thereto, trough-like members welded to the ends of the fluid-conducting members to form headers, all of said welds being on the exterior surface of the radiator.

4. The method of forming a radiator which comprises positioning a plurality of pairs of substantially rectangular abutting plate members, welding said pairs of plates about their peripheries, inflating each pair of plates to form fluidconducting passages therebetween, diverging the top and bottom of each pair of plates to form substantially flat surfaces normal to the plates, bending the outer edges of the diverging portions inwardly to form flatsurfaces parallel to the plates, attaching together the parallel flatsurfaces of each pair of plates and thereafter attaching hollow members to the ends 'of the attached plates in fluid-conducting relation thereto.

5. The method of forming a radiator which comprises positioning a plurality of pairs of substantially rectangular abutting plate members,-

weldingeach pair of plates about their peripheries and shaping said plates to form fluidconducting passages therebetween, diverging the top and bottom of each to form substantially fiat surfaces normalto the plates, bending the outer edges of the diverging portions inwardly to form flat surfaces parallel to the plates, bringing each pair of plates into abutting relation along the parallel flat surfaces and welding them along the points of contact and thereafter welding trough-like members to the ends of the attached plates in a fluid-transmitting relation.

6. A fluid circulating unit comprising in combination a plurality of risers disposed in substantially parallel relation, therisers havingtheir ends turned outwardly back on themselves to provide engaging flanges, welds uniting the engaging flanges, and headers welded on the risers forming a complete unit with the welds being external to the structure.

RALPH WARRENDER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2662273 *Mar 24, 1950Dec 15, 1953Gen Motors CorpMethod of making heat exchange structures
US2740188 *May 24, 1952Apr 3, 1956Gen Motors CorpMethod of making a heat exchanger element
US2756487 *Jun 4, 1952Jul 31, 1956Gen Motors CorpMethod of forming passages in a forgewelded sheet metal structure
US2766514 *Aug 24, 1953Oct 16, 1956Olin MathiesonProcess for making hollow metal articles having passageways
US2926003 *May 4, 1955Feb 23, 1960Olin MathiesonHeat exchanger
US2934322 *Sep 1, 1955Apr 26, 1960Frederick E HazardHeat exchanger
US3016230 *Mar 30, 1959Jan 9, 1962Gen ElectricHeat exchange assembly
US4099559 *May 10, 1976Jul 11, 1978Olin CorporationSolar absorber plate design
US4109711 *Nov 17, 1975Aug 29, 1978Olin CorporationHeat exchange panel
US4120351 *Nov 17, 1975Oct 17, 1978Olin CorporationHeat exchange panel with improved header
US4235287 *May 2, 1975Nov 25, 1980Olin CorporationHeat exchange panel
US4476856 *Dec 29, 1983Oct 16, 1984E. Cacarda GmbhProcess for the production of a solar collector panel assembly and a panel assembly produced thereby
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/130, 29/890.46, 165/175, 165/174
International ClassificationB21D53/02, B21D53/04
Cooperative ClassificationB21D53/04
European ClassificationB21D53/04