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Publication numberUS1996874 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1935
Filing dateAug 28, 1933
Priority dateAug 31, 1932
Publication numberUS 1996874 A, US 1996874A, US-A-1996874, US1996874 A, US1996874A
InventorsDesire Mascau Emile
Original AssigneeDesire Mascau Emile
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Articulated ankle joint for artificial feet
US 1996874 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- April 9, 1935. E. D. MASCAU ARTICULATED ANKLE JOINT FOR ARTIFICIAL FEET Filed Augl 28,.1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 April 9, 1935. E. D. MAscAu 1,996,374

ARTICULATED ANKLE JOINT FOR ARTIFICIAL FEET Filed Aug. 28, 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 1 a amt HHHHQ Patented Apr. 9, 1935 warren stares ARTICULATED ANKLE JOINT FOR ARTIFICIAL FEET Emile Desire Mascau, Rouen, France Application August 28, 1933, Serial No. 687,206 In France August 31, 1932 2 Claims.

This invention relates to artificial feet and has for its object to provide an articulated ankle joint rendering possible any kind of movement of the artificial foot.

The invention has for its object more particularly to produce an ankle joint of simple con struction which will allow universal relative movement of the foot and leg portions of the artificial limb by means of a ball separating two U-shaped riders linked together and which can be easily adjusted by nuts provided on the lower ends of the lower rider. Lateral movement of the foot is provided for by supporting the bend of the upper rider in a correspondingly shaped groove provided longitudinally in a transverse axle bearing and bending and flexing of the foot is provided for by forming a recess in the foot in which the axle bearing is free to rock.

In order that the invention may be more clear- 1y understood it will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a sectional side elevation of an artificial foot provided with the articulated ankle joint in accordance with the invention.

Figure 2 is a sectional view at right angles to Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a plan view in section of the device.

Figure l is a detail of the device as will hereinafter appear.

Figure 5 is a side elevation partly in section of part of a modified form of the device.

Figure 6 is a sectional View at right angles to Figure 5.

Figure 7 is a side elevation partly in section 35 of a further modification, and

Figure 8 is a sectional View at right angles to Figure 7.

The joint comprises two U-shaped riders l, 2 linked together and separated by a ball 3 running 40 in grooves 4, 5 provided on the inner sides of the bends of the riders I and 2. These bends are of substantially rectangular cross section and the limbs of the riders are of circular cross section and threaded at their extremities to receive nuts 6, I, 8, 9 for holding them in position relatively to the calf and foot as shown in the drawings. The limbs of the upper rider I pass through apertures in a plate l0 resting on the bend portion of the rider which, as mentioned above, is of rectangular cross section.

An axle bearing II (shown separately in Figure 4) is mounted transversely of thefoot, and comprises a hollow axle portion l2, li and a helm-spherical portion I3 provided with a longitudinal groove M which is U-shaped to receive the U-shaped bend of the upper rider l This arrangement provides for the lateral movement of the foot by the rider 1 moving in the groove M about the ball 3. This movement is controlled by means of helical compression springs l5 and it arranged in the hollow portions I2, 52 of the axle bearing H and engaging the underside of the plate it. The springs l5, it are held inclined towards the joint by means of gudgeon pins it, it and ll, ll which are fixed respectively to the axle bearing H and to the underside of the plate l0.

The bending and flexing movements of the foot are provided for by forming a recess in the foot shaped to receive the axle bearing H and allowing the bearing to rock in the recess about the ball 3 according to the movement of the upper rider i. This movement is controlled by means of cushioning members of rubber or other suitable material mounted in recesses formed in the foot.

Thus it will be seen that all movement of the foot takes place about the ball 3 as centre and the compression springs l5 remain always in the direction of the calf and operate in a straight position irrespective of the position of the foot. The lower rider 2 on which the foot is suspended is preferably shorter and wider than the upper rider i and holds in contact the various com-' ponents of the articulated joint whereby the latter can be adjusted by adjusting the screws 8 and 9.

The joint can be used in connection with any kind of foot and calf but is shown in Figures 1 and 2 as applied to wooden calves, in Figures 5 and 6 as applied to calves of compressed wood reinforced by means of steel stays l8, and in Figures 7 and 8 as applied to metal calves, for example duralumin.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:-

1. An ankle joint for artificial feet comprising a U-shaped member and means for securing the U-shaped member to the calf, an inverted U- shaped member linked in the first member and means for suspending the foot from said member, a bearing mounted in a recess transversely of the foot and having a U-shaped recess arranged longitudinally therein and running transversely of the foot for receiving the bend of the first mentioned U-shaped member, a ball mounted in a groove provided in the inside of the bend of said first member and supporting the inverted, U-shaped member, lateral relative movement of the leg and foot being allowed by motion of the U-shaped member in the recessed bearing about the ball as center and bending and flexing of the foot being allowed by the rocking of the bearing 5 in its recess about the ball as center.

2. The combination with an ankle joint as claimed in claim 1 of a helical compression spring Hm Li." has.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6120547 *Nov 6, 1998Sep 19, 2000Roland J. ChristensenEnhanced prosthetic foot structure with ankle reinforcement
US6663673May 3, 2002Dec 16, 2003Roland J. ChristensenProsthetic foot with energy transfer medium including variable viscosity fluid
US6805717Oct 8, 2002Oct 19, 2004Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development, Lc, General Manager Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited PartnershipEnergy-storing prosthetic foot with elongated forefoot
US6875241Feb 5, 2003Apr 5, 2005Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development Lc, General Partner Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited PartnershipVariable resistance cell
US6875242Dec 16, 2003Apr 5, 2005Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development, Lc, General Partner Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited PartnershipProsthetic foot with energy transfer medium including variable viscosity fluid
US6911052Oct 8, 2002Jun 28, 2005Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development, Lc, General Partner Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited PartnershipProsthetic foot with oblique attachment
US6929665Oct 8, 2002Aug 16, 2005Roland J. ChristensenProsthetic foot with a resilient ankle
US6966933Oct 21, 2003Nov 22, 2005Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development, Lc, General Partner Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited PartnershipProsthetic foot with an adjustable ankle and method
US6969408Sep 30, 2003Nov 29, 2005Ossur Engineering, Inc.Low profile active shock module prosthesis
US7169190May 2, 2005Jan 30, 2007Van L. PhillipsActive shock module prosthesis
US7172630Feb 20, 2004Feb 6, 2007Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development, Lc, General Partner Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited PartnershipProsthetic foot with cam
US7341603Apr 4, 2005Mar 11, 2008Applied Composite Technology, Inc.Prosthetic foot with energy transfer including variable orifice
US7371262Sep 2, 2005May 13, 2008össur hfLow profile active shock module prosthesis
US7419509Sep 8, 2004Sep 2, 2008Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with a resilient ankle
US7462201Oct 20, 2004Dec 9, 2008Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with an adjustable ankle and method
US7520904Oct 19, 2005Apr 21, 2009Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with an adjustable ankle and method
US7572299Mar 15, 2006Aug 11, 2009Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with energy transfer
US7618464Aug 3, 2006Nov 17, 2009Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with variable medial/lateral stiffness
US7686848Jan 4, 2008Mar 30, 2010Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with energy transfer
US7727285Jan 22, 2008Jun 1, 2010Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with variable medial/lateral stiffness
US7794506Sep 16, 2008Sep 14, 2010Freedom Innovations, LlcMulti-axial prosthetic ankle
US7824446Dec 5, 2007Nov 2, 2010Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with longer upper forefoot and shorter lower forefoot
US8034121Apr 17, 2009Oct 11, 2011Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with two leaf-springs joined at heel and toe
US8500825Jun 29, 2010Aug 6, 2013Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with floating forefoot keel
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/49, 623/52
International ClassificationA61F2/50, A61F2/60, A61F2/66
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2002/5075, A61F2/6607, A61F2002/6614
European ClassificationA61F2/66A