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Publication numberUS1997081 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1935
Filing dateJul 14, 1931
Priority dateJul 14, 1931
Publication numberUS 1997081 A, US 1997081A, US-A-1997081, US1997081 A, US1997081A
InventorsReynolds Charles H
Original AssigneeAlbert & J M Anderson Mfg Comp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical connection
US 1997081 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 9, 1935. c. H. REYNOLDS ELECTRICAL CONNECTION Filed July 14, 195.1

Z 2 66 6 6 I E Y //A\ /V//// up? Inventor:

l Z W 1.

Patented Apr. 9, 1935 ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONv Charles H. Reynolds, Malden, Mass.,assgnor to Albert & J. M. Anderson Manufacturing Company, South Boston, Mass., a corporation of Massachusettsr Application J-uly 14, 1931, Serial N0. 550,651 Y Claims.

This invention relates to an electrical connection and particularly toa plug and socket connection.v

In general, the invention has for an object .to

5 provide a plugand socket connection of novel and improved construction, which is particularly designed for use in high tension circuits with maximum safety and in which the plug and socket members are insulated from one another in a novel and superior manner.

With this general objectin view and such others as may appear, the invention consists of the electrical connection, and in the various structures, arrangements `and combinations of parts hereinafter described and particularly defined in the claims at the end of this specification.

In the drawing illustrating the preferred embodiment of the invention, Fig. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a hightensio'n plug and socket connection embodying the features of the present inventionyFig. 2 is a cross-section on line 2--2 of Fig. 1; and Fig. 3 is a detail in section on line 3-3 of Fig. 2. n Y

Referring to ythe drawing, which `as above stated illustrates the preferred embodiment of the invention, as therein shown the electrical connection includes a plurality of plug members I0 adapted to be inserted into rand withdrawn from cooperative socket'members I2. The plug members III may be mounted within a metal casing I4 and the socket'members `I2 may be mounted within a similar casing I6, and as herein shown provision is madefor detachably connecting together the casings I4, I6 to form a unitary struc- 5 ture when theplug members I0 are inserted into the socket members I2 in the use of the electrical connection. The casings I4, I6 may be provided with suitable openings I5 for the cables to be connected to the plugs and sockets and witha coupling I1 for detachably connecting thecasings together. A key I 9 cast within the casing I8 vis adapted tot into a groove 'in the casing I4 to insure that the proper plug cooperates with the proper4 socket.

5 The present construction of plug and socket unit isy particularly designed for use in highA ten-l `sion circuits to provide a plug and socketconnection in which the plug and socket members 50 are insulated from each other in a novel manner designed to prevent breaking down of the insulation in the event of arcing, which affords maximum safety, and minimum liability ofV current leakage and/or flash over from one plug or- 55 socket member to another, and also from any plug or socket member to the casing or to the ground.A i As herein shown the plurality of plug members I0 are operatively supported in spaced relation within the plug casing I4 by a transverse insulating supporting member 2D of substantial thickness and herein shown as comprising a disk provided with a plurality of spaced holes therein through which .the individual plug members I0 and tubular insulation 2I extend, as will bedescribed. The insulating supporting disk maybe secured to lugs 22 cast integrally with the casing I4 by a plurality of bolts 24, as illustrated. Each plug member isitself insulated within a tubular body of insulation 2I which is arrangedto extend a substantial distancebeyond one lend of each ofthe plug members, and as herein shown each insulating tube 2| comprises an insulating tube` 26 bf substantial thickness, which is arranged. to extend through one of the holes in the partition or supporting member 20 and is provided with'a shoulder 28 which bears against one face 29'of the insulating supporting member 20. A threaded insulating sleeve 30 is screwed upon the externally threaded outer end portion of the insulating tube 26 and into engagement with the second surfaceI of the insulating supporting member 20 to thereby clamp tothe support 20 the insulating tube 26 and the Vother insulating parts carried thereby and whichr'make up-the complete tubular insulation 2 I. Each plug meuf-- ber III is preferably provided with the usual socket 40 at its outer end into which the end of the cable may be soldered to connect the cable to the plug, and the socket end of the plug is enlarged to provide a shoulder 42. A tubular insulator 44vhaving a threaded portion 45 is screwed intol the threaded outer end of the insulating tube 26, to thereby clamp the head of the plug I0 between it and the outer end of an elongated insulating tube 46, screwed into the second end of the insulating tube 26. It will be observed by refer--Y ence to Fig. 1 that each'plug I0 is clamped be` tween the ends of the insulating tubes 44, 46, bothA of which are threaded into the insulating tube 26, and the latter is clamped to'the transverse insulating support 20 so that the insulation for each plug, as well as the plug itself, is thus mounted upon and supported by the transverse insulating support 20, and the latter is mounted within the casing I4 to be movable as a unit therewith.

The holes within the transverse insulating supporting member 20 through which each plug and its insulation extend are spaced suiliciently so as to provide a substantial air space between the insulation of adjacent plug members. The spacing of the plug members and their individual solid insulation from each other to surround each with a substantial body of air forms a desirable andefiicient insulation comprising the solid insulation together with the interposed body of air. This method of insulating the individual plug members from each other has proven to provide safe and highly efiicient insulationv when the connector is used in high tension circuits. Tests have demonstrated that even if the tubular insulation is punctured, should the connector besubjected to voltages many times in excess of its intended capacity, very little insulating efiiciency is lost since after the extinction of the arc, the; air alone serves as adequate insulation.

The insulation for each plug member is extended a substantial distance beyond the outer end of the plug-jas clearly shown in Fig. 1, so that a relativelyilI-lozig path is interposed for reducing to a minimum current leakage, creepage, orflash "over from the head of one plug to the other over essary for the current to traverse the inner surface of the insulatingV tube 44 and thence down the outer. surface of the insulating sleeve 30 and across the intervening portion of the insulating support 20, and thence out the outer surface of an adjacent insulating tube 44 to the second plug, and this indirect relatively long path which is interposedfor thepassage of the leakage of the current,.together with vthe substantialair space between the heads of adjacent plugs, reduces to a minimum the chance for current leakage from oneplug to the other to occur.

It will also be observed thateach plug member I is itself enclosed within a relatively long tubularinsulation extended a substantial distance beyond each end of the plug. As above stated each plug member III is adapted for insertion 'into a corresponding socket member I2 and each socket member I2 is mounted within a transverse insulating partition 60 in. a manner similar to the manner in which the plug members are mounted in the transverse partition 20, as above described, and as herein shown each socket member I2 is provided with an enlarged head 62 having a socket 63 into which the end of the cable may be inserted and soldered, and the head 62 of each socket member is clamped between an insulating piece 6I which is threaded and screwed into the interior of an elongated main insulating tube l6l andan insulatingtube 66 which `is also threaded and screwed into the outer end of the threaded hole in the outer end of the main insulating -tube 6l. Each insulating tube 64 thus operatively supports the socket member I2 within it and the tube 6I isarranged to extend through a preformed hole inthe transverse partition 60 and such holes are spaced apart, as illustrated, to provide a substantial air space between the insulating tubes 6I, Each tube 64 is clamped to the'transverse partition 60 by an` insulating` clamping sleeve 61 screwed onto the end of each tube as shown. The

as above described. It will also be observed that the substantial air space interposed between adjacent insulated sockets provides a combined insulation, which, as in the case of the plug members, as above set forth, emciently insulates the sockets from one another and from the casing and enables the connection to be used in high tension `circuits with maximum safety. y

The socket insulating tubes 64 may and preferably wil be 'of a size sufficient to telescope over the ends of the plug insulating tubes I8 when the plugs I0 are inserted in the sockets I2, and the insulating tubes 64, 46 are preferably made of such length as to remain in telescoping relation during the operation of withdrawing the plugs from their sockets Yand until the plugs have been separated from the sockets.

It is to be understood that in practice the present plug and socket connection will be broken only after the power has been cut off by the usual means, such as the usual oil circuit breakers. Should, however, any minor arcs be formed when the ends of the plugs leave their sockets, the tele` scoping relation of insulation of the plug and socket members affords additional protection.

`I'he present construction of electrical connection is designed for use under all sorts of weather conditions, and inpractice the telescoping relation of the casings I4, I8 serves to render the connection weather-proof. In certain instances, however, it may be desirable to render the connection water-tight, and for this purpose it'is preferred to interpose a gasket I8 of rubber or other waterproof packing within the coupling I1. A rubbergasket 23 mayand preferably will also be provided at the end or ends of the casing through which the cable extends, it being understood that incertain instances'a threaded coupling will be provided at onerend of the. casing when the electrical connection is to be screwed upon a conduit. In other instances the vrubber gasket construction may be provided at both ends of the outer casing when the electrical connection is not intended to be screwed onto `a conduit.

The headsv of the individual plug and socket members 'are preferably Vloosely supported, within their individual insulation to permit sumcient play as illustrated so that the individual plugs and sockets may be self-aligning. kpracticeit may bepreferred to provide this clearance between theheads of the plugsand their supporting insulation or between` the heads of the sockets and their supporting insulation, orif desired both the plugs and socketsmay be provided with sutil-V cient clearance for this purpose. In practice also the central pole of the velectrical connection is made the ground pole. 'Ihis arrangementadds considerably to the safety with which the present connection may be used inasmuch as in assembling the connection the ground connection must of` necessity corne at the center and it becomes impossible to introduce a high tension plug into the ground socket. In addition, in practice the ground plugand its socket are made of dimensions diiferent than the dimensions of the high tension plugs4 and sockets,thus providing an additional safeguard against accidental connection of a high tension pole with the ground socket.

From the description thus far it will be appar# ent that' the construction of the present plug and socket connection is such as to minimize liability of current leakage from one plug or socket to to the others, or of `current creepage or flash over, as above described, and that the plugs and sockets are insulated in a most eiiicient and practical manner both from each other and from the outer protective casings. The construction is one which lends itself particularly to use in high tension systems.

While the preferred embodiment of the invention has been herein illustrated and described, it will be understood that the invention may be embodied in other forms within the scope of the following claims. e

Having thus described the invention what is claimed is:-

l. An electrical connection having, in combination, a casing provided with an insulating supporting member mounted therein, a plurality of plug members spaced apart and operatively supported by said supporting member, and elongated insulating members within which said plug members are mounted, said insulating members extending through spaced apart openings in said supporting member and projecting a substantial distance beyond the supporting member and a substantial distance beyond each end of the plug member, and a second casing arranged to telescope with the first casing and itself provided with an insulating member operatively supported therein and having a plurality of socket members adapted to cooperate with the aforesaid plug members, said socket members being mounted within elongated insulating sleeve members projecting through and operatively supported in spaced relation by the insulating supporting member in said second casing, said insulating sleeve members projecting a substantial distance beyond each side of the insulating supporting member and a substantial distance beyond each end of the socket members, said projecting insulating members forming effective barriers for current leaking across the surfaces of said insulating sup porting members.

2. An electrical plug and socket connection comprising an outer casing, a plurality of plug members, a plurality of cooperative socket members, a hollow elongated insulator for each plug and socket member extended beyond the opposite ends of said plug and socket member, and means for mounting said plug and socket members and their insulators within said casing in fixed relation thereto and with each member and its insulator spaced a substantial distance from an adjacent member and its insulator and surrounded by.a substantial body of air within said casing.

3. In an electrical connection, in combination, a casing, a plurality of electrical connectors, and means for operatively supporting said connectors within the casing and in insulated relation 'from each other and from the casing, including, a sup-v porting disk secured to the casing in fixed relation thereto, a hollow elongated insulator for each connector extended through said supporting disk and beyond the opposite ends of the electrical connector with which it co-operates and separated on opposite sides of said disk from the hollow insulator of an adjacent electrical connector by an air space of substantial width.

4. In an electrical connection, in combination, a casing, an insulating supporting member secured within said casing, a plurality of hollow insulators extended through said supporting member and projecting beyond the front and rear surfaces thereof, electrical contact members located in said hollow insulators and having their opposite ends removed from the opposite ends of said hollow insulators a substantial distance, said hollow insulators having theirprojecting ends separated from one another by an air gap to cause current leaking from one contact member to an adjacent contact member to travel longitudinally of one insulator toward said insulating supporting member, across the face of the latter, and then away from said supporting member longitudinally of the adjacent insulator.

5. In an electrical connection, in combination, a casing, an insulating supporting member secured within said casing, a plurality of hollow insulators extended through said supporting member and projecting beyond one surface thereof a substantial distance and separated from each other for the length of the projecting portions by an air gap, electrical contact members located in said hollow insulators and having one end removed a substantial distance from the end of the projecting portion of the hollow insulator, said hollow insulators co-operating with the insulating supporting member to form on one side of the insulating supporting member a relatively long insulating surface over which current leaking from one contact member to an adjacent contact member is caused to pass longitudinally of one insulator toward the insulating supporting member, across the surface of the latter and then away from the latter longitudinally of the adjacent hollow insulator. v

' CHARLES H. REYNOLDS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2440279 *Nov 6, 1944Apr 27, 1948Larkins Jr John SCable connector
US2448509 *May 14, 1943Sep 7, 1948Sperry CorpElectrical connector
US2513080 *Aug 11, 1945Jun 27, 1950Burtt Horatio HElectrical connector
US2555683 *Oct 22, 1945Jun 5, 1951Lamar L DayConnector for electric circuits
US2642474 *Sep 14, 1949Jun 16, 1953Honeywell Regulator CoElectrical connector
US3040287 *Nov 14, 1958Jun 19, 1962Albert AgronElectrical connector
US3091750 *Oct 29, 1959May 28, 1963Anderson Electric CorpElectrical connector
US3157450 *May 2, 1961Nov 17, 1964Harrison Brad CoElectric cable connector
US3229058 *Dec 22, 1961Jan 11, 1966Ite Circuit Breaker LtdCubicle unitary molding for upper and lower terminal assembly and current transformers
US3295097 *Jul 9, 1964Dec 27, 1966Nu Line Ind IncElectrical connector with bent pin contact
US3360763 *May 26, 1965Dec 26, 1967Killark Electric Mfg CompanyPlug and receptacle for use in hazardous locations
US4221446 *Oct 2, 1978Sep 9, 1980The Bendix CorporationElectrical connector assembly
US4386820 *Aug 29, 1980Jun 7, 1983Amp IncorporatedModular connector for power systems
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US8399771Nov 23, 2009Mar 19, 2013Cooper Technologies CompanyVisual latching indicator arrangement for an electrical bushing and terminator
US8541684Feb 8, 2013Sep 24, 2013Cooper Technologies CompanyVisual latching indicator arrangement for an electrical bushing and terminator
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/186
International ClassificationH01R13/53
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/53
European ClassificationH01R13/53