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Publication numberUS1997146 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1935
Filing dateJan 21, 1932
Priority dateJan 21, 1932
Publication numberUS 1997146 A, US 1997146A, US-A-1997146, US1997146 A, US1997146A
InventorsHynes Lee P
Original AssigneeHynes Lee P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric heater
US 1997146 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 9, 1935s L, P, HYNES LQQZMG ELECTRIC HEATER Filed Jan. 21, 1932' 2 sheets-sheet 1l INVENTOR ATTORNEY L. P. HYNES ELECTRIC HEATER April 9, 1935.

Filed Jam.A 21, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 E 91E lui, f 1

INVENTOR Bee I? Hynes ATTORNEY Patented Apr. e, 193s .Parlzzrlr lOFFICE ELECTRIC HEATER Lee P. Hynes, Philadelphia, Pa. Application January 21, 193%2, Serial No. 588,035

37 claims.

For a detailed description of the present form .of my invention, reference may be had to the vfollowing. specification and to the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof, wherein Fig. l is a side elevation of my exible heater;

Fig. 2 is an endl elevation of my insulator element;

Fig. 3 shows my exible' heater being introduced into a bent tube;

Fig. 4 shows one form of connection;

Figs. 5 and 6 show pipe joints;

Fig. 7 shows the application of my invention to -agateinadam;

Fig. 8 shows the suspension of a line of heaters by means of the iiexible strip;

Fig. 9 is a front elevation of the dam gate illustrated in Fig. 7.

My invention relates to an electric heater, including the coils, the insulator and the insulation mounting, which is intended particularly for use in large installations, such, for instance, as the melting of ice from the guides of hydroelectric flood gates, or the prevention of freezing of water pipes in winter, or maintaining the ilow of heavy viscous liquids in pipes or maintaining a railway track free of ice. In such instances lines of metalpipe fty or one hundred feet long are equipped with heaters, and are handled in long water-tight sections, While, in other installations, great numbers of heaters areemployed, involving thousands of unit insulation sections, which. by my invention, are made capable of ready man pulation for construction, transportation, installationand repair. This is particularly true in cases where the outside metal pipes are iirst placed in position and the heater lines inserted afterwards. This is true to a largedegree, even if the enclosing pipe is a ilexible hose, so long as the bends in the hose are not sharp enouglrto prevent insertion of the wires. In the case' of too sharp bends the Wires may be inserted in the flexible hose before the hose is laid.. That will meet certainy situations, the flexible hose being water tight and closed at one end by suitable fittings, the other end being open for insertion and connection of the wires. In all instances the heater as a whole should be simple and capable of reliable operation for long periods, without attention to repairs, and my herein-described heater itself has proved capable -of meeting all such practical requirements under diilicult conditions.

In particular my invention makes it possible to ship completely finished apparatus from a factory, while, at the point oi application, requires mere assembling, in ready, easy fashion, without (ci. zie-'19) further constructive work on it remaining to be done on the ground.

Referring to the drawings., it will be observed that my heater is based primarily on a long flexible metal supporting strip'marked A. This strip A is not in the electric circuit, but is merely a mechanical support for a series of comparatively short insulating blocks or sections B.- Such a support A provides for the upholding and manipulation of a long line of insulator blocks, many in number. This is particularly applicable to the type of heaters to which my invention chiefly belongs, wherein it is important to construct and manipulate the heaters in long lines applicable, for instance, to a long pipe and containing a great amount of heater-Wire distributed longitudinally along the pipe. It is of special value in that it permits a line of insulators, with the wires therein, to be suspended vertically in a pipe from its upper end. On the upper end of the said flexible strip a hook is formed by bending over the strip and this hook is merely lodged over the end of the pipe and carries the entire line of insulators. By this means also the number of leading-in connections, which have to be insulated in the pipe and protected outside of the pipe, is greatly reduced. Such leading-in wires can thus be limited in most cases, to one end of the pipe, in contrast to a number of such leading-in wires applied at distant points along the length of the pipe. Another advantage of the strip form of the support is that it may be made ilexible without impairing its strength. The strip form of support can also be made quite thin and thereby addlittle to the cross section of the heater. 'It

also permits the insulator block to be comparatively short and slightlyyseparated, each fromthe one following it. By this means the series of insulators as a whole may have the desired llexibility while the mechanical strength of the line of insulators is supplied by the metallic strip, rather than by the insulators themselves. At the present time the most available material for insulators, such as I use, is of a porcelain nature, which is fragile' and, unless of inordinate size, is weak, besides being hard and inflexible. v So a single piece of porcelain as a support of such a length as I require in most cases, would not have suflicient strength, unless of impracticable size in cross section, and wouldv not be bendable and also extremely liable to cracking and breakage. But by means of my supporting metallic strip and comparatively short insulators 'spaced slightly apart, I secure, not

all the insulation that is required electrically,

with only small demands upon the mechanical qualities of the porcelain.

My short pieces of porcelain, marked individually B in the drawings, I construct with a :dat base portion C having inclined sides (see'Fig. 2) and on the side opposite to' the metal strip is a separate rib D extending longitudinally thereof. I then add to the block at intervals transversely disposed, upwardly projecting, rounded flanges E. These anges or arches I perforate with concentricholes, see F, G and H in Fig. 2. Through these holes I extend thel conducting wires K, preferably in the form of a spiral coil. By running the coils K throughl the holes in the porcelain iianges E, I avoid the need of fastening devices attached at intervals to secure the` coil to the porcelains. Usually this conductor, which is wound into'the coils, may be left bare of the usual insulating covering since it is insulated on all sides and separated from the interior walls of the nietal tube by the porcelain. The blocks D may be connected with the support A in any desired manner. However, for the purposes of illustration, said blocks are shown as provided with shouldered openings O leading downwardly therethrough from the tops of the-ribsj D to the bottoms of the-blocks. Suspended in said recesses are split metal members a Vhaving heads a' engaging the shoulders of said openings O, the free ends a2 being extended through suitable openings in the support a, and spread apart as clearly shown in Figure 1.

`These insulator blocks are in cross sectionnearly circular, so that with the flexible ymetal strip they will substantially t into a round tube. This also permits three holes in the projections, which allows a B-phase circuit to be carried thereby in safety It also brings the three conductors nearthe center of the block and concentric therewith.

The heater, as above described, is ordinarily,

enclosed in a sealed pipe or tube N into which it is thrust longitudinally, the leading-in wires being connected at one end of the pipe and insulated otherwise outside of the pipe. Since no foreign conducting articles can enter the sealed pipe and come in contact with wires K, it becomes safe to rely for insulation on the porcelains. The aforesaid metal supporting strip A can slide along one of the internal sides of the pipe, while the rounded porcelain iianges E will slide along the opposite interior face of the outside tube, as is shown in Fig. 2. In other words,

. the rounded ribs E, the downwardly and inwardly tapered sides of the bases C, and the strip A are so relatively positioned and proportioned as to provide a heater of approximately circular.

'cross-section. ,This brings the wires K practically in the center of the tube when they are permanently maintained in position and the arches on the block give it, as stated above, a substantially circular contour tting the tubes. Moreover, this construction` permits theheat to be applied in any direction by having the blocks turned towards any side of the tube where the heat is wanted. Then the faces of the blocks will actas reectors for the radiated' heat. I electrically connect succeeding sections,of conductor K, by short plates L which are held to the ends of the coiled wires K by a short bolt and nut. When it may be necessary 'to connect the parallel wires K, I employ a U-shaped piece, M, shown in Fig. 4, which bridges over the separator D and is screw-connected at its respective ends to the conductors K, K. The adjacent ends of the porcelain blocks may be secured to the metal support strip in anydesired manner, such as by bent fasteners, and on the bottom of each block are short protuberances which serve to space the block from the strip. The longitudinal spacing of blocks from one another is to permit flexibility of the series of blocks in order to follow bends in the metal strip. The separation of the blocks is normally slight but it may be greater at points where the sections o-f the metal strip are joined by splicing or overlapping, or where the sections of the coiled conductors are connected together.

, To illustrate the applicability of my construction to the purposes above described, I have shown in Figs. 5 and 6 different types pf a junction between two pipes containing heater coils placed at anangle to one another. In Fig. 5

an L-junction is shown and in Fig. 6 a T-junction. The junction occurs at a break between adjacent blocks, and the conductors in the vertical line of blocks are connected to one or both of the conductors in the horizontal line by metal connecting strips L. In practice the outside metal pipes may be placed in position first. Then the line of strip-supported blocks may be inserted and the conductors in the vertical set connected to the conductors ofthe horizontal set as mentioned above. Finally the couplings for the outside metallic tubes may beapplied to seal the junction. The insulating blocks, lined up along the metal strip` and attached thereto, are all joined up at the factory and shipped in iinished lengths ready to be connected end to end when assembled on the ground. This assembling is, in my arrangement, even easier than the assembling of similar lengths'of cable.l So .far as I know, this is the first instance of a long length of flexible conductor insulated by porcelainv blocks and ready to be inserted in a metal tube as contrasted with a cable insulated by a plastic covering;

Figs. 7, 8 and 9 exemplify typical uses of my invention for heating the edges of a gate in al dam. Such gates may be 75 feet high, or higher and exposed to the coldest winter weather. A slight leakage of water around the edges is unavoidable and in winter the gate will, by freezing of such leakage, become frozen fast in its frame so that it cannot be `raised or lowered, unless artificially heated. A

4In Fig. '7 R is the masonry of the dam and Sl is a gate set to slide in vertical grooves in said masonry. Along the sides of the groove a space T is left for the insertion of my above-described heater. In said space are placed metal tubes for receiving the heater, these tubes may be at the sides of the gate, as at the right of Fig. '7, or at the end thereof, as shown atthe left of Fig. 7 When these tubes are in place it only remains to drop into them a length of my abovewhereas by suspensionv from the top they hangA easily and safely.

In Figure 8, the tubular casing N` is provided at its upper end with an enlarged chamwith the longitudinal axis of saidv casing.

Said port is normally closed by a removable plug n3. A branch conduit n4 is connected with the chamber n inA such manner that a conductor 115 `may be brought to the chamber and connected in suitable manner with each terminal ns located at the adjacent ends of theY resistors K.

In Fig. 9 the gate S is shown as also provided with marginal heating at its bottom edge. A pipe U extends down one side, carrying the lead wire `W. This pipe U communicates with a cross pipe Von the lower edge in which is placed a line of iny heater supplied by the wire or wires W. These pipes U and V rise and fall with the gate S. In such cases the active face of the heater is turned to direct the heat in the desired direction. Fig. 8 shows the suspension of a heater from its top'end ina metal tube by means of the flexible strip A which is bent to hook on to the top edge of the tube. The 'open end ofvtube V,

through which the unitary heater structure is insertable and removable is closed by a screw plug v'. The upper' end of pipe W is closed in a similar manner by a plug w.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In an electric heater, means for supporting a heater element of substantial length, said means comprising a at strip of flexible material, a plurality of rigid blocks .of dielectric material arranged adjacent each other and end for end in longitudinally spaced relation along one fiat face of said strip, and means for i'lxedly attaching said blocks to said strip in such manner that they are free to move relatively to each other so as to conform,togilexib'le adjustments of said strip, each of said blockshaving. means for engaging a heater element of a length approximately corresponding to the length of the strip.

2. In an electric heater, means for supporting a heater elemen't of substantial length, said means comprising a nat strip of exible material, a plurality of blocks of dielectric material each having a base provided with an upper conductor receiving face for engaging a heater element of a length corresponding to the length of the strip.

'said blocks being arranged adjacent to each other end for end, and` in longitudinally spaced relation along one flat face of said strip, and' means for xedly attaching said blocks to said strip lin such manner that they are free to\move relatively with respect to each other s0 as to conform to exible adjustments of said strip.

3. In an electric heater, means for supporting relation along said strip, and meansfor securing said blocks to said strips in such manner that the bottom faces of the blocks abut the adjacent face of the strip, and the blocks are free to move rality of rigid blocks of insulating material each having a base provided with an upper conductorreceiving face iand transversely disposed arched conductor-retaining members extending from said upper face, said blocks being arranged adjacent to each other in longitudinally spaced end for end relation along one :dat face of said strip, means for flxedly attaching the bases of said blocks to said strip in such manner that they are free to move with respectto each other so as to conform to flexible adjustments of said strip, and a longitudinally disposed conductor of approximately the length vof the strip extended throughthe arched members of successive insulator blocks. 5. In an electric heater, means for supporting a heater element of substantial length, said means comprising'a fiat strip of exible material, a plurality of rigid blocks of dielectric material, each provided with a iiat base portion with conductorguide means on the top thereof, said blocks being arranged end for end adjacent to each other and in longitudinally spaced relation along the strip with the bottom faces of the base portions thereof in engagement with one at face of said strip, and means for xedly attaching said blocks to said strip in such manner that they are free to move with respect to' each other so as to con form to flexible adjustments of the strip.

6. In an electric heater, a exible strip, and

a plurality of rigid insulator blocks, each hav.- ing a base provided Vwith an upper conductorreceiving face and having its lower portion attached to Asaid strip in a normally xed manner, said conductor-receiving space having transversely disposed arched conductor-retaining members and a longitudinally disposed separator member connecting said 'arched members, and longitudinally-disposed conductors disposed in -spaced relation along said separator members and extended through the arched members of successive insulator blocks, said blocks being longitudinally spaced along said strip so as to be free to conform to flexible movement of the strip.

7. In an electric heater, a flat strip of e'xible material, a plurality of rigid blocks of dielectric material arranged adjacent to each other and inv end for end relation along one face of vsaid strip, each block having a base portion positioned adjacent to said last mentioned face, means for ilxedlyL attaching the bases 0f said blocks to thev strip in such manner that the blocks are free to move with respect to each other to conform yto flexible adjustments of said strip, and one or more conductors supported by said plurality of blocks, each conductor extending the full length of the series of said blocks.

8. In an electric heater, a ilat strip of! flexible material, a series of rigid blocks of dielectric material arranged adjacent to each other and in end for end relation along one face of said strip, each block'being of greater length than its width and having its base portion engaging said last mentioned face, said base being'provided with a conductor-receiving portion, and means for fixedly attaching said blocks to said strip in such manner that the blocks are free to move with respect to each other so as to conform to flexing adjustments of the strip.

. 9. In an electric heater, means for supporting a heater elementof substantial length, said means comprising a flat stripv of exible material, a series of rigid blocks. of dielectric material arranged adjacent each other in end for end relation along one at face of said strip, each block having a base provided with a top portion from which extend a plurality o f arched conductor-retaining members, and means for xedly attaching the bases of said blocks to said strip in such man-y ner that they are f ree to move with respect to each other so as to conform to flexing adjustments of said strip, the faces of said blocks which lie adjacent to the strip having portions spaced from said strip.

10. In an electric heater,'means for supporting a heater element of substantial length, said means comprising al flat strip of iiexible material, a series of rigid blocks of dielectric material arranged adjacent to each other in end for end longitudinallyspaced relation along one face of the strip, each block having a base provided withv one or more protuberances bearing against the said face of the strip, and means for attaching the blocks to said strip in such manner that they are free to move with respect to eachother during flexing adjustments of the strip.

v11. In an electric heater, means for supporting a heater element of substantial length, said means comprising a flat strip of flexible material, a plurality of series ofrigid blocks of dielectric material, the blocks of each series being arranged adjacentto each other in end for end relation along one face of the strip, any two series being separated by an intervening space between adjacent ends thereof, an electric heater formed of sections corresponding approximately to the length of a series of said' blocks, metal strips connecting adjacent ends of the conductor sections across said intervening space, so as to provide a continuous conductor extending the length of all of the series of blocks, and means for attaching the blocks to the strip in such manner that the blocks are free to move with respect to each other during flexing adjustments of said strip.

12. In an electric heater, means for supporting a heater element of lsubstantial length, said means comprising two or more at-strip-like sections of flexible material connected end for end to form a longer flat strip, a plurality of series of rigid blocks of dielectric material, there being one series of said blocks for each section of said strip, each series of blocks being arranged with the blocks adjacent each other in end for end relation and disposed along one face of a striplike section, the series being respectively spaced from each other at the joints of the strip sections, and means for fixedly attaching the blocks to the strip sections in such manner that the blocks are movable with respect to each other so as to conform with flexing adjustments of the longer strip.

13. In an. electric heater, a flexible strip, and a plurality of rigid insulator blocks, each'block having a base attached to said strip, said blocks being relatively spaced along said strip, so as to be freeto conform to flexible movements thereof, each block having a longitudinally disposed spacing rib on the top face thereof, conductors engaging all of said blocks and disposed on either side of said ribs, and connectors between adjacent parallel conductors, each connector consisting of a metal strip shaped to pass over the said 'rib and having its ends provided with conductor engaging means. l

14'. Inan electric heater, means for supporting a heater element of Asubstantial length, said means comprising a fiat strip of flexible material, a series of rigid blocks of dielectric material oi greater length than width, said blocks being arranged adjacentto each other in end for end relation and longitudinally spaced along one face of said strip, each block having a base provided with a at surface lying adjacent to said face, and alsohaving arched conductor-engaging portions on theV face spaced outwardly from said flat surface, and means for fixedlyattaching said blocks to said strip in such manner that they are free to move with respect to each other so as`to conform to flexing adjustments of said strip.

15. In an electric heater, a series of blocks of greater length than width arranged end to end, a exible metallic strip located exteriorly of the blocks and ,attached thereto, each block having a flat base on the side next to the strip and transverselyA disposed longitudinally spaced arched projections on the face which is awal7 from said strip, said projections being provided with conductor-receiving openings, means iixedly attaching the blocks to the strip, and conductors engaging the last mentioned faces of said blocks and passed through said openings, said blocks being longitudinally spaced along said strip so as to be free to conform to exible movement thereof.

16. In an electric heater, a rigid insulator block having a base portion provided on one face with an integral longitudinally disposed separating rib and integral transversely disposed arch members extending above'the plane of said rib, Vsaid arch members having conductor-receiving openings therein.

17. In an electric heater, a rigid insulator block having a base portion provided on one face with an integral longitudinally disposed separating rib and integral transversely disposed arch members extending above the plane of said rib, said arch members having conductor-receiving openings therein, said base having inclined sides converging inwardly and downwardly.

18. In an electricA heater, an elongated insulator block of approximately circular contour in cross section and having a at bottom surface,

`a longitudinal rib on the top surface and arched portions extending across said rib and Yeach having a series of openings therein, the openings in each arched portion-being equally spaced from.

the curved edges of said arched portion and also equally spaced with respect to each other.

19,. An electric heater comprising a, tubular casing, and a-heater element within the casing,

said heater element including a exible metal strip and a series of rigid insulator blocks, each block having a contour complemental tosaid tube, said blocks being attached to said strip in longitudinally spaced relation, so as to conform to flexible movement thereof, said strip being necting said blocks in a longitudinal series-at and arranged to engage an end of the casing tov suspend'` said heater element therein.

22. An electric heater comprisingV a tubular casing, and a heater element within said casing, y

said heater element including a .series of rigid necting said blocks in a longitudinal series at positions outside of the mocks, anafmaintaming them in exible longitudinally spaced relation, and electric conductors extending the length of the series and engaging said insulator blocks.

. ing, a continuous ilexible m'etal support member extending .longitudinally within said casing, a series of insulator blocks located within said casing and each provided on Cone side with arched projections complemental to the interior of the tube, and having the other side attached to said support, and continuous electrical conductors extended through said arched projections.

24. In an electric heater, two connected tubular casings disposed at an angle with respect to each other, each of said `casings containing heater elements each including a series of insulator blocks each having a base portion attached to a exible strip extended longitudinally through its casing, said blocks being longitudinally spaced so as to conform to ilexible movements of said strips, electric conductors supported by the respective series of insulator blocks, and means establishing'electrical connection between the conductors in the respective casings.

25.` In an electric heater, a ilatstrip of flexible material, a plurality of rigid blocks of dielectric material arranged adjacent to each other in end for end relation and longitudinally spaced along one fiat face of said strip, each of said blocks having a plurality df angularly disposed conductor-supportingfaces so constructed and ar' casing, heating means within said casing, said heating means comprising a at strip of iiexible material extended longitudinally through the tube, a plurality of rigid blocks of dielectric material arranged adjacent to each other in end for end relation and relatively spaced longitudinally along one face ofsaid strip, each block having a cross-sectional contour complemental to the cross-sectional contour of said casing, means for ilxedly attaching said blocks to said strip in such manner that the blocks are freeto move 'with respect to each other so as to conform to ilexing adjustments of said strip, electrical heating elements carried by said blocks, and means on said blocks for maintaining said heater elements inv respect to the wall oi' the and removed vfrom said casing, and exposed electrical conductors extending throughout the length of the casing and supported by all of the blocks.

28. An electric heater comprising an external casing, a series of insulator blocks therein, a 23. In an electric heater, a tubular metal casilexible strip attached to said blocks and passing between the blocks and the interior surface of the casing, said strip being formed of two or more sections connected end for end, electrical conductors engaging said blocks and each formed of two or more sections joined end for end, said blocks being normally spaced approximately uni- -form distances from each other, but more Widely bodiesand provided with spaced openings positioned and arranged to correspondingly space electric resistor c oils in front of said reflecting walls, means in said downwardly extended open- I ings constructed and arranged to secure the blocks to support means, and means carried by said blocks for interconnecting two or more resistor coils.

30. In an electric heater, a plurality of aligned insulator blocks each provided with a middle longitudinally disposedreenforcing rib and heat reflecting walls arranged in different planes,

transversely disposed cross members projecting upwardly from said bodies and provided with relatively spaced openings positioned and arranged to correspondingly space electric resistor coils in front of said reflecting Walls,` support means, and attaching means extended downwardly through the rib of each block. and releasably engaging said support means at a position below the block.

31. In an electric heater, a casing having a terminal chamber, a plurality of aligned insulator blocks each provided with a middle longitudinally disposed reenforcing rib and heat reiiecting walls arranged in the casing in different planes, each block having openings extended downwardly therethrough from the tops of said ribs, transversely disposed cross members projecting upwardly from said bodies and provided with spaced openings positioned and arranged to correspondingly space electric resistor coils in front of said reflecting walls, a iiexible support, meansin the openings through said blocks constructed and arranged to connect said blocks with said support member, and means carried by said blocks for interconnecting two or more resistor coils.

32. In an electric heater, a rigid insulator block having one yface provided with an integral longitudinally disposed separator rib an'd integral transversely disposed spacer members extending above the plane of said rib, said transverse members having conductor-receiving openings therein so arranged as to space electric conductors Awith relation to the faces of the rib, and means extended over said rib and provided with portions constructed and arranged to interconnect said conductors at one end.

33.In a heater of the character described, the combination with a tubular casing adapted to be supported adiacent to an object havingf an area to be heated, of heating means insertable into and removable from' said casing while the latter is in a xed position, said heating means comprising a at strip of flexible material extended longitudinally through the tube, a plurality o! rigid blocks of dielectric material arranged adjacent to each other in end for endrelation and relatively spaced longitudinally along one face of said strip,`means for xedly attaching the blocks to said strip in such manner that said blocks are free to move with respect to each other so as to conform to flexing adjustments of the strip, electrical heating elements carried by said blocks, and

.means on said blocks for maintaining said heater elements in spaced relation with respect to the wall of the casing.

34. In a heater of the character described, the combination'with a iiexible tubular casing, of heating means insertableinto and removable from said casing, said heating means comprising a at strip of exible material extended longitudinally through said casing, a plurality of rigid blocks of dielectric material arranged adjacent to each other in end vfor end relation and secured vthey are free to mQvewith respect to each other to conform to flexing adjustments of said strip as it is inserted into and removed from said casing, and electrical heating elements carried by said blocks.

35. In aheater of the character described, thecombination with a body having an area to be heated, said bodyhaving a longitudinal groove therein contiguous to said area, of a tubular casing located Within said groove, and heating means insertable into and removable from said casing while the latter is in operative position, said heating means comprising a at strip of exble mataching said blocks to the strip in such'manner that the blocks are free to move with respect to each other so as to conform to flexing adjustments of the strip, and electrical heating elements carried by said blocks.

36. In a heater of the character described, the combination with a tubular casing adapted to be supported adjacent to an object having an area to be heated, of heating means insertable into and removable from said casing while the latter is in operative position, said heating means comprising a iiatI strip of exible material extended longitudinally through the tube, a plurality of rigid blocks of dielectric material arranged adiacent each other in end for end relation and relatively spaced longitudinally along one facev of said strip, each block having a cross sectional contour complemental to the cross sectional contour of the casing, means for xedly attaching said blocks to said strip in such manner that the blocks are free to move with respect to each other so as to conform to ilexing adiustments of the strip, electrical heating means carried by said blocks, and means on said blocks for maintaining said heaterl elements in\spaced relation with respectv to the wall of the casing, said heating means being rotatively adjustable within the casing so as to bringl the heating elements adjacent to the area to be heated.

37. An electric heater comprising a tubular casing having an enlarged chamber at one end, said chamber having a port therein in alignment with the casing, a branch conduit for electrical conductors, said conduit communicating with said chamber, a unitary heater structure -consisting of a ilat strip of flexible material, a plurality of insulator blocks attached to said strip and arranged in spaced relation along one side of the strip and one or more heater elements engaging and supported by all of the blocks in such manner that said elements are spaced from the wall of the casing, said strip and said heater elements beingof approximately the same length as the casing, said unitary structure being so constructed and arranged that it may be introduced -into the casing and removed therefrom through said opening-as a unit, a closure for said port, means for so restricting longitudinal movement of vsaid unitary heater structure as to maintain an end of each heater element within said chamber, and means within the chamber whereby the heater elements may be connected with a conductor carried by said branch conduit.

' -LEE P. HYNES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2464052 *Jan 13, 1947Mar 8, 1949John NumrichHeating unit for pipes
US2469287 *Oct 10, 1945May 3, 1949Frank YokelRefractory element for electric heaters
US2536747 *Mar 31, 1948Jan 2, 1951Lee P HynesElectric resistance heater and heated vessel
US2620426 *Sep 3, 1949Dec 2, 1952Mcgraw Electric CoHigh-temperature electric insulating construction
US2750487 *Aug 12, 1952Jun 12, 1956Turbine Equipment CompanyElectric heater
US3302003 *Sep 28, 1964Jan 31, 1967Kinney Theodore SElectric heater
US3308272 *Dec 22, 1964Mar 7, 1967Harmon Louis OElectric space heater
US3718806 *Jul 7, 1971Feb 27, 1973Potter PElectric resistance heater with spaced insulators and an inter-connectable flexible metallic base strip
US3756032 *Mar 10, 1971Sep 4, 1973Riva Calzoni SpaSluicegate structure
US4464565 *Mar 16, 1983Aug 7, 1984Spangler Glenn CExtensible tape heater
US4857707 *Apr 11, 1988Aug 15, 1989Whirpool CorporationFlexible frame heater element for dryer
US20140355971 *May 30, 2013Dec 4, 2014Osram Sylvania Inc.Infrared Heat Lamp Assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/534, 219/542, 219/536, 338/305, 219/541, 219/552, 338/333, 219/550, 338/213, 219/549, 405/87
International ClassificationH05B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationH05B3/00
European ClassificationH05B3/00