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Publication numberUS1997959 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1935
Filing dateJul 3, 1933
Priority dateJul 3, 1933
Publication numberUS 1997959 A, US 1997959A, US-A-1997959, US1997959 A, US1997959A
InventorsWood Clyde W
Original AssigneeWood Clyde W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Road material mixing machine
US 1997959 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

` April 16,1935- l Ac.w,woo|:a

i ROAD MATERIAL MIXING MACHINE l4 sheets-shet 1 Filed. July 3, 1955 Irl www( v A TTORNE April 16, 1935. C, Wl WOD l ROAD MATERIAL MIXING MACHINE 4 sneets-shet 2 Filed Julyy 3, 1933 ,n lil .M 1l..4|| IJI W. S F. i@ illllMlllln www N I A MW. A .wm M dmmm. v .ma ,m if M Ww o 1 I 1||` I`N Pq @n nw LA .u W 1 IVR MM w. m e .H @mw .I im M d W .A .LN M m... .m l -am.

April 16, 1935. W, WOQD l ROAD MATERIAL'MIXING MAcHINEl Filed July's, 1933 r4 sheets-sheet S vBY V. ATTQRN -s,

April 16, 1935. W, WOOD 1,997,959

ROAD MATERIAL MIXING MACHINE Filed July 3, 1933 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 A TTRNE S.

Patented Apr. 1e, 193s l,997,i59

UNITED lSTATES PATENT. ol-Flce RQAD MATERING MACHINE Clyde W. Wood, Stockton, Calif. Application July 3, 19,33, Serial N0. 678,913

z3 claims. (CL ca -4s) Thisv invention relates to a road material mixbetween the side bars of the main iframer in a ing machine; the invention forming a continuamanner hereinafter to be described is a vertically tion in part of my copendlng applications enadjustable frame. T'his frame-ls best shown in titled Mixing machine for road material nled Figs. 2 and 9, and as noted, consists of a pair of May 27th, 1932, VSerial Number 613,887, and horizontally disposed longitudinally extending 5 Road material mixing machine led Decemchannel bars 4 connected at opposite ends by ber 2nd, 1932,'Serial Number 645,387. cross bars 5 and 6. Welded, orotherwise secured,

'I'he object of the present invention is to gentothe bars 4 are pairs of vertically disposed erally improve and simplify the construction and channel bars 1, and secured to the lower ends of lo operation of machines of the character described; the bars l are a pair of horizontally disposed to providera road material mixing machine I-beams 8, there being one on each side of the 'wherein dirt, sand, gravel, or other material frame. i v forming the surface or shoulders of a road, or The vertically adjustable frame` forms a supthe like, may be thoroughly mixed with oil or port for a mixing cylinder; a rotatable conveyor any suitable binder for the formation of a road and mixer which extends therethrough; a hous- 15 surface, and more particularly, to provide a maing fl'lnng e furnace OI' the I'eCeDtOnDf One chine adapted to travel over the road, or surface 01' more Oil burners whereby the mixing Cylinder to be treated, and whichvis capable cf gathering is heated and it furthermore carries a pair of up the material while traveling over the surface ground engaging runners, the function 0f which and then thoroughly mixing the material with a Will hereinafter be described- 20 binder and finally redepositing the material in Themixing cylinderextends substantially from a condition to be leveled on and rolled or otherend to end of the vertically adjustable frame, see wise compacted to form a nished road surface. Figs. 1, 3 and 7, and eenSiStS 0f 1EWG SeetOnS. a The road material mixing machine is shown lower half section 9 whichis permanently secured by way of illustration in the accompanying drawbetween the channel'bars 4-4 of the `vertically 25v ings, in whichadjustable frame and an upper half section I0 Fig. 1 is a side elevation of the machine. which is removable and functions as a cover to Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the vertically adpermit access to the cylinder for cleaning. inspeejustable frame. tion, repair, etc.

:zo Fig. 3 is avplan view of the machine showing The furnace is disposed below the lower half 30 the: cylinder cover removed. section of the cylinder and consists of a bottom Fig. 4 is a vertical cross section taken on line Plate l, See FigS- 1 and 9, Wheh iS Welded 01' IV--IV of Fig. l. otherwise secured to the I-beams 8. This plate Fig. 5 is a plan View of the auxiliary transmisextends from the forward intake end of the cylinsion supported on the vertically adjustable frame. der to the rear end, and side plates I2-l2 are 35 Fig. 6 is a side elevation showing the rear end also provided and extend the Seme distanceof the road materiall mixing machine, said view These plates, together with end plates andthe also showing the manner in which a truck or bottom plate Il, form a chamber below the lower trailer supplying oil or other binding material half of the cylinder and a pair of oil burners,

is attached to the machine. such as indicated at I3, are positioned at oppo- 4o Fig. 7 is an enlarged central vertical longisite sides of the chamber and near the forward tudinal section of the mixing cylinder, said view end. The names from these burners are directed also showing the rotatable conveyor and mixer rearwardly along opposite sides of the lower half mounted wihin the cylinder and the manner in of the mixing cylinder and nally escape through 4;, which it is driven. a pair of stack members |4|4 which are dis- 45 Fig. 8 is a vertical cross section taken on line posed one on each side of the furnace chamber. VIII-VIII of Fig. 1. Y 'I'he material conveying and mixing mechanism- Fig. 9 is a vertical cross section taken on line is best illustrated in Figs. 'I and 9. It consists IX--IX of Fig. l.. of a shaft I5 which extends from end tovend of Referring to the drawings in detail, and parthe mixing cylinder. This shaft is journaled aty 50 ticularly l and 3, A indicates the s'de bars its forward end in a bearing i6 which is secured of a main frame supported at its rear end by a. to the lower side of a cross beam l1. The rear cross axle and a pair of Wheels 2, and at the forend of the shaft is journaled in a bearing I8 and ward end by drawbar coupling 3 whichis attached this bearing is secured to thek inner face of the te e tractor B 0f any Suitable type. Suspended cross bar or beam s. The shaft intermediate the 55 bearings I6 and I8 is preferably square in cross section and a' plurality of tubular arms are secured to the shaft throughout its length as shown. These arms are welded to V-shaped clamps generally indicated at I9, one arm to each clamp. These clamps and arms are placed in opposition to each other on the shaft and are there secured by bolts and the like indicated at 2l. The outer ends of the arms functin as a support for a helical-shaped conveyor band 2| which is riveted, welded, or otherwise secured. The outer ends of the arms also form supportsfor a series of paddles or blades generally indicated at 22, which serve two functions, rst that of assisting the mixing of the material and secondly that of partially retarding or throwing back the material against the action of the helical feeder 2| so that a more thorough mixing action will be obtained. f

By referring to Fig.7 in particular, it will be noted that the lower half of the mixing cylinder extends from the point 23 to the rear or discharge end indicated at 2l and that the upper half or cover section extends a considerable distance forwardly of the forward end of the lower half of the cylinder. This is an important feature as a space Yis thereby provided whereby a feeding mechanism may be introduced to assist delivery of the road material into the mixer. When the machine is in operation a scraper blade 23, which is secured tothe forward end of the lower half of the mixing cylinder, extends into the ground anywhere from four to six inches below the surface to be treated. When the machine is moving forwardly over the surface, the dirt or material tends to build up to a considerable extent-in front of the scraper blade and as such would impose a considerable drag cr load on the tractor hauling the machine. Such building up of the material in front of the blade 23 is however avoided by the application to the shaft I5 of the arms indicated at 2B. These arms carry a pair. o f helical conveyor bands 2l and as the material gathers in front of the scraper blade 23 it is engaged by the helical conveyor and thrown rearwardly into the front end of the lower half of the mixing cylinder. A section of a helical conveyor, such as shown at 28, is employed at the forward end of the conveyor 2|. This assists in `removing the material delivered by the scraper blade and by the conveyor 21. In other words it tends to maintain the space immediately rear- Wardly of the blade clear and thereby forces the material rearwardly where it is acted upon by the paddles and finally discharged at the rear end. It should also be noted that a space 29 is formed` between the conveyors 2l and 2|. This is of considerable importance as it often happens that material is encountered which contains fairly large rocks or boulders. If the conveyor band was continuous from the extreme forward end to the rear end there would be a tendency to jam the rocks between the scraper biade and the conveyor band and thus cause bending and, breakage but by providing an interruption in the band, or the space indicated at 29, such danger is entirely avoided.

On the other hand if the side Ashoulders of a paved highway are to be treated, a comparatively narrow strip of material will be passed through the mixer and it is then possible to operate at a. speed, say for instance, a half mile an heur, as less material will be handled. In actual practice it has been found that the revolutions per minute of the conveyor and mixing blades should not be much excess of seventy-ve revolutions per minute, as any speed beyond that tends to throw the material outwardly by centrifugal action. Plainly speaking, the revolutions must be kept down to a point where the material is not passed through the mixer too rapidly so that a thorough mixing action may be obtained without throwing the material centrifugally, andinasmuclr as the machine is intended to travel at different speeds means must be provided for maintaining the revolutions of the mixer at a constant speed regardless of the speed with which the machine proper is driven. For this purpose an aum'liary transmission is provided which is generally indicated at D, see Fig. 7. Y

This transmission is best shown in Fig. 5. Power from the tractor is utilized. The power is taken from the power take-off shaft generally indicated at 3| at the rear end of the tractor. It is then transmitted through a splined and telescoping shaft 32, which is connected with the transmission D, through a universal coupling 33. If the tractor is traveling at a slow speed, for instance a quarter of 'a mile an hour. when handling a wide strip of material the power from shaft 32 is transmitted through the gears indicated at 34 and 35, but when the tractor is driven at a half milespeed the power will be transmitted through the gears 36 and 31; the power trom shaft 3S being nally transmitted to the shaft I5 through a reduction sprocket chain drive generally indicated at 40. The shifting of the gears is accomplished by conventional means, the gears 34 and 36 being slidable on a splined shaft 34a so 'that they may be brought into mesh with the gears 35 and 3l, respectively.

A sliding sluiting bar 35a carries an arm 36a which ts a groove between the gears and moves them in either direction upon sliding of the shifting bar which isr fitted with a clevis 31a at its outer end for connection with any suitable operating lever, not shown. Hence, regardless of whether the tractor is operating at its high or low speed, a substantially constant speed of rotation may be maintained within the mixer, this being essential as previously described to prevent centrifugal throwing of the material, and it is i also essential as it has been found that the best action is obtained if a constant amount of material is maintained in the mixer at all times. In other words if the machine is operating at slow speed and handling a certain strip of material there will be a predetermined amount of mateiial continuously passing through the mixer. Again, if the machine is traveling at half mile speed and handling a narrow strip cf material substantially the same amount of material will pass through the machine as the speed of the tractor is doubled. Another advantage of maintaining such a condition is" that it substantially eliminates any adjustment of the spray nozzles whereby oil or other binder is delivered. That if the amount of material passing through is lil constant at all the amount of oil or other hinder delivered may he constant. On Athe other hand if the amount or material varied in properti'on to the speed at which the machine was traveling over the surface to be treated, changes in I adjustments would be required.

In order that the amount of material passingthrough the mixing cylinder may be -regulated, a pair of gathering. blades are placed at the forward end of the machine. These blades are indi- 'cated at 4| and 42. They are hingedly secured at their inner ends, as indicated at 43, to the` forward end of the vertically adjustable frame. These hinges are furthermore disposed at opposite ends of the transversely disposed scraper blade 25, and if the blades assume the position shown in Fig. 3, material from a comparatively wide area will l--e gathered inwardly and will thus be delivered to the front end of the mixing cylrality of nozzles 41 and they direct the oil or otherbinder employed in the form of a spray directly onto the material to be gathered up and mixed. The quantity of oil or other binder thus employed will, of course, be comparatively large and means must be provided for maintaining a continuous supply. This is accomplished as shown in Figs. 1 and 6 by employing' a tank wagon trailer such as shown at 48. This is con- .,nected to the rear end of the road material mixing machine by a drawbar 29 and exible pipe connections' may be made between the tank and a pump generally indicated at 50. This pump has an inlet connection 5i which is connected with the bottom of the tank 48 through a flexible plpe connection 52. YThe discharge of the pump is indicated -at 53 and this is connected through a I l... l l

pipe 54 with one end of a transverse pipe 55, see Fig. 4. The opposite end of this transverse pipe is connected to a pipe 51 and this extends forwardly and is connected with one end of the .transverse pipe 46 on which the spray nozzles 41 are mounted. Any suitable valve is provided for' opening or closing the iiow` through the pipe connections vdescribed so as to shut oif the flow and also to regulate the flow.

-By again referring to Fig. 4, it will be noted that the transverse pipe 56 is provided with a. plurality of spray nozzles 56a and that these are -valve controlled, each valve lhaving an extension rod 58 which is adapted to be pulled or lifted so as to open one or more of the spray nozzles 53a. These nozzles are disposed at a point rearwardly of the discharge end of the mixing cylinder and they are only utilized if it is found that an additional quantity of oil or binder is required.

'By referring to Figs. 1 and 6 it will be noted that the supply pipe 54 is provided with a gauge 60 which indicates the pressure on the oil. It is also provided with a meter 6l and a thermometer 62. By these means temperature, pres- -sure and the exact quantity of oil employed may be determined. A by-pass connection G3 is formed around the meter and this is valve controlled so that oil'may be by-passed around the metervif desired. Anautomatic relief valve is positioned at the point 64 and this is connected with a valve 65, this valve being in turn connected through a'flexible hose'SG with the tank and with a by-pass pipe 61, which connects with the suction side of the pump. When the road material mixing machine is vin operatiomnpower is delivered to operate the pump 50 from arrengine generally indicated at 68, see Fig. 3. With the pump in operation oil will be drawnfrom the bottom of the tank and will pass through the pipe 54 forwardly to the spray nozzles indicated at 41, and if additional oil is required one or more of the nozzles indicated at a may be opened. The capacity of the pump will normally be a littlelarger than the quantity of oil actually delivered to the nozzles and it'is for this reason that an automatic relief valve is employed. That is, the moment the pressure on the oil reaches a predetermined pressure valve 64 opens and the oil thus passes through the valve 65 and the bypass connection 61 back to-the intake of the pump. The valve 65 is a three-way valve and, if desired, it may be so adjusted that the excess oil may be returned through the hose G6 back to the tank. If it is desired to throw the meter out of operation it is only` necessary to open the valve controlled by-pass 63.

By referring to Figs. 1, 3 and 6, it will be noted that a comparatively large fuel tank is placed on the rear end of the road material mixing machine as indicated at 10. 'I'his tank may contain a fuel oil, such as distillate, or the like, and it is primarily intended to supply fuel to the oil burners indicated at I3, see Figs. 1 and 9. A pair of pipes such as shown at 1| are connected with the respective burners and with the bottom of the tank 18. These pipes are valved controlled and the size of the flame may thus be controlled. The burners are of the centrifugal atomizing type and are electric motor driven. Current is supplied lto each motor through proper wire connections and the current is obtained from a. generator 12 driven by the engine 68,'see Fig. 3. The distillate is not only employed for the purpose of supplying-the burners but it K is also employed for cleaning'out the pump, the meter, the spray nozzles and the several pipe connections when a run is completed. That is,

lthe type of binder or oil employed is usually a comparatively heavy grade of oil and ows readi- Vly when maintained at the proper temperature.

It has a tendency to harden and clog whenV cool, hence it is 4advisable when shutting down to clean out the several connections so as to have clear passage when the machine is again to be placed in operation.

To accomplish this a pipe 13 is connected at one end with the fuel tank 10 and at the opposite end with the intake of the pump, see Fig. l. By shutting the valve 14 onthe inlet pipe and by placing the pump 50 in operation distillate will be sucked into the intake vof the pump through the pipe 13. By closing the valves 63 and 54a oil may first be circulated through the relief valve 64, by-pass valve 65 and the by-pass connection 61, and when this is cleaned out the valve 65 may be adjusted to direct the oil into the hose 61 and discharge it into the tank 48. By opening the valve 54a distillate may be directed through the meter and the pipes connected with the front and rear set of spray nozzles. These pipe connections and the spray nozzles may thus be cleaned out, and when this is accomplished the valve on pipe 13 may be closed andthe pump shut down.

It was previously stated that the mixing cylinder, the furnace cooperating therewith, and so on. were supported in aV vertically adjustable frame which was suspended between the side bars A of the main frame. lThis method of suspension will now be described and particular reference will be made to Figs. 1, 4 and 8. By referring to these figures it will be noted that a pair of hydraulic cylinders 80 are secured to the side bars A-A on the main frame at a point adjacent the rear end. Each cylinder carries a piston 8| and these'pistons are connected by a cross bar 82. This crossl bar carries a pair of chains 83 and these are connected to the rear cross bar 6 of the vertically adjustable frame. A pair of cylinders 84 are secured to the side bars A--A of the main frame at a point adjacent the forward end of the same. A piston 85 is mounted in each cylinder and the pistons are connected by a cross bar 86, this cross bar also carries a pair of chains 81 and these chains are connected to the forward cross bar 5 of the vertically adjustable frame, see Fig. 8. Means are employed f'or actuating each individual hydraulic cylinder, hence making it possible to raise orlower any of the Corners of the vertically adjustable frame or t raise and lower the frame as a whole. `This is accomplished by providing a series of hand pumps, one for each cylinder. These pumps are indicated at 88, see Figs. l and 4. Each pump is provided with a hand lever 89 to permit it to be operated by hand and each pump is provided with an inlet pipe 90 and a discharge pipe 9i, there being one discharge pipe from each pump to each hydraulic cylinder and there being one Iintake pipefor each hand pump, said intake pipes being all connected to a common reservoir or tank 92 which contains oil for operation of the hydraulic cylinders or jacks. Each hand pump is also provided with a return pipe 94 and a valve 95. By closing the'valves 95 and operating the pump handles or levers 89 oil is pumped from the tank 91 to the respective hydraulic jacks or cyl-' inders indicated at 80 and 84 supplying them with oil and causing the pistons to raise. If it is desired to lower any one of the hydraulic jacks, it is only necessary to open one or more. of the valves 95. This permits the oil to flow back through the pumps to the supply tank 92, thus manually actuated means are provided for raising and lowering the vertically adjustable frame as a whole. Either end may be lifted or lowered; or any corner may be lifted and lowered. Vertical adjustment of the frame is essential as it controls the depth to which the scraper blade 23 enters the material to be treated. If it is desired to treat the material to a depth of approximately six inches the frame is lowered until the lower face of the blade 23 is six inches below the surface. yIf a greater depth Ais "required it can be further lowered and so on. The gathering blades 4I and 42 are also supported by the adjusable frame and are raised and lowered with the scraper blade and as such will sink into the material to be treated the same depth as the scraper and they will direct the material toward the scraper blade where it will be engaged by the conveyor and thrown rearwardlyinto the front portion of the mixing cylinder and then fed through as previously described.

It was previously stated that a pair of ground engaging runners were employed. These runners lare best illustrated in Figs. 1, 'I and 9, and are indicated at 92. These runners extend from the scraper blade to the rear end of the mixing cylinder, there being one runner at each side and they are welded or otherwise secured to the I- beams 8. The runners are not intended to carry the weight of the adjustable frame and the mechanism carried thereby, as the weight is carried by the hydraulic jacks and the chains 83 and 81. A certain amount of weight, however, is carried by the runners but that is not their main function. It is obvious that when a large body of material is passing through the mixing cylinder 'and when the conveyor is rotating there will be a'tendency to transmit a turning torque to the mixing cylinder and the adjustable frame. This torque is taken care of by the runners and twisting of the vertically adjustable frame is thereby relieved to a very considerable extent. The pairs of vertical channel bars 1 on the vertically adjustable frame form guide members be- .tween the side bars A--A of the main frame;

that is, the vertical channelbars of the vertifv cally adjustable frame engage the inner faces of the bars A-A and thus guide the vertically adjustable frame when it is being raised or lowered by the hydraulic jacks and they also assist in taking up part' of the turning torque transmitted through the rotating mixer and conveyor when the machine is in operation. It might be said that the vertically adjustable frame and all the mechanism' carried thereby floats as it is hung from the chains 83 and 81. In view thereof it is essential that the drive to the mixer be mounted on the same frame. It is for this reason that the auxiliary transmission D is supported directly on the cross beams on the forward end of the vertically adjustable frame, see Fig. 7. Hence, no adjustment or disconnection of the drive is necessary when vertical adjustment is made between the main frame and the vertically adjustable frame. The drive shaft 32 connected with the" frame and to opposite sides of the vertically adjustableframe, thereby permitting free vertical movementv but preventing endwise movement.

In actual operation the road material mixing machine is. pulled ahead by the tractor shown in Fig. 1; the vertically adjustable frame being lowered until the scraper blade 23 reaches substantially to the bottom of the loose material forming the road surface, this material having previously been loosened by road breaking machines, scariners, etc., and reduced to proper consistency for mixing with oil or the like. As the machine advancesthe loosened materialis engaged bythe gathering blades 41 and 42 andV by these blades directed toward the scraper blade and partially elevated by the same. The material has a tendency to pile up in front of the scraper blade and as such would produce a drag and materially increase the load or pull imposed on the tractor.

To prevent piling up of the material and to insure positive feeding into the forward end of the mixing cylinder the double helical feeder, shown at 26 and 21, is employed. This feeder is disposed ahead of the scraper blade and as such engages the'material and throws it rearwardly and to the front end of the mixing cylinder. The material is thus prevented from piling ,up in front of the machine and is furthermore positively, delivered into the forward end of the cylinder. ,After the material has entered the cylinder positive movement of the material in a rearward direction is insured by the double arrangement of the helical conveyor indicated by the numerals 2l and 28, but once the material has started in a rearward direction the single.A helix, which continues to the rear end of the cylinder, is all that is required. Space must be allowed for the arms on which thc mixing paddles are secured. These paddles, as previously stated, are arranged at diierent angles to insure an eiective mixing action, the last few paddles being set on an angle to retard dischargeV of the material and to throw a portion of the material forwardly. This arrangement of the paddles insures a thorough mixing of the materials passing throughthe cylinder and, furthermore, insures a positive and continuous movement and a uniform deposition at the rear or discharge end of the cylinder.

The oil or other binder employed is discharged orv sprayed on top of the loosened material through the nozzles 41, the'oil being drawn from the trailer tank 48 by the pumpA 50 and delivered to the spray nozzles under pressure. The oil contained in the tank 48 is hot to insure thorough mixing with the material but experience hasshown that there is a tendency for the oily mass to chill and adhere to the walls of the mixing cylinder, particularly as the material approaches the rear or discharge end. It is for this reason that a furnace chamber has been arranged along each side and under the lower half of the cylinder. By properly regulating the quantity of fuel oil delivered to the burners I3 practically any temperature may be-maintained, particularly toward the rear end so that the oil and consequently the mass will be retained in a ready flowing condition.

The auxiliary transmission indicated at D isy .a very desirable feature as it permits operation of the mixer at a constant speed regardless of the tractor speed.- -The tractor is capable of traveling either at a high or low speed; approximately a quarter of a mile an hour being the low speed and half a mile per hour the high speed. When traveling at the lower speed the gathering blades 4l and 42 are set to gather material from a strip of maximum width. A substantially predetermined quantity of material will then pass through the mixing cylinder. The spray nozzles are .regulated to give the proper mixture, etc. If the trailer speed is increased to the high speed or half mile an hour, the gathering blades must be adjusted to Vgather a strip of approximately half the width formerly handled. The quantity of material passing through the high speed will, however, be the same even though the strip gathered in is only half of that formerly handled, this being due to the fact that the machine is traveling at double the speed. Under the high speed condition the rotating speed of the mixer would tend to double as the tractor speed has doubled, but by using the-two to one reduction obtained by the auxiliary transmission the rotating speed of the mixer will be reduced to half or to the identical speed maintained when the tractor was traveling at low speed. Hence, the conditions in the mixer will be constant regardless of tractor speed as the y 5 oil delivered-by the spray nozzles will be censtant, vthereby avoiding continuously changing and adjusting duringA operation.'

The material passed through the mixing cylinder is deposited at a uniform rate at the rear end of the machine andmay here be engaged by a leveling blade, such as shown at 99, and it may then berolled or otherwise compacted to form a finished road surface. All pipe connections whereby the oil or other binder employed is handled maybe readily cleaned due to the connection between the fuel tank and the pump and remaining piping system. The cover forming the upper half of the mixing cylinder may be quickly and readily removed at any time for inspection, cleaning," and repair by employing a stanchicn such as indicated at |00, see Figs. 1 and 3, by hooking a'chain block to the stanchion and swinging it over the cover, connection may be made with the handle of the cover and it may be elevated and then swung to one side. By thus removing the cover all parts are rendered accessible and adjustments or repairs may be quickly made.

Individual adjV ent ofthe gathering blades 4i and l2 isa desirable feature. For instance, when treatingthe shoulders on the side of a paved highway, one of the gathering blades will be set in a position'to runparallel with the edge of the pavement while the other blade will be angularly adjustedto rea/ch out and gather ln as wide a strip of shoulder as desired, and as either gathering blade may be adjusted vindependently of the other the machine is both right and'left hand in operation; that is, it may be run along the shoulder of a highway on either side of the road and it may travel in either direction with relation tothe roadwhen operatlDg- Having vthus described my invention, what I claim and desire tov secure by Letters Patent is- 1. A road materialmixing machine comprising a wheel supported main frame adapted to be connected to a-tractor to be pulled over a road to be surfaced, a cylinder carried by the frame, means for gathering up material from the road. and for delivering it to the cylinder, a rotatable conveyor and mixer in the cylinder for mixing, conveying and discharging the material at the rear` end of the cylinder, and means for transmitting power from the tractor to drive the mixer and conveyor.

2. A road material mixing machine comprising a wheel .supported main frame adapted to be connected to a tractor to be pulled over a road to be surfaced, avmixing cylinder carried by the frame, means for gathering'up material from the road and for Ydeliveringvit to the cylinder, a rotatable conveyor and mixer in the cylinder for mixing, conveying and discharging the material at the rear end of the cylinde a vertically adjustable frame mounted in the main frame and forming' a support for the cylinder, together with the earth-gathering mixing and conveying mechanism, a multiple speed transmission on the vertically adjustable frame and connected to drive the rotatable conveyor and mixer, and means for transmitting power from the tractor to drive the multiple speed transmission.

3; A road materialvmixing machine comprising a wheel supported main frame adapted to be connected to a tractor to be pulled over a road to be surfaced, a cylinder carried by the frame, means for gathering up' material from the road rear end of the cylinder, a vertically adjustable frame mounted in the main frame and forming a support for the cylinder, together with the earth gathering mixing and conveying mechanism, a multiple speed transmission on the vertically adjustable frame and connected to drive the rotatable conveyor and mixer, and a telescoping shaft universally connected at one end with the multispeed transmission and adapted to be universally connected to a power take-oil shaft on the tractor to transmit power from the tractor to the multispeed transmission.

4. A road material mixing machine comprising a main frame mounted to travel over a road to be surfaced, a frame supported by the main frame, means for vertically adjusting said frame with relation to the main frame, a cylinder supported in the vertically adjustable frame, a conveying and mixing mechanism rotatably mounted in the cylinder, and means carried by the vertically adjustable frame for gathering and delivering road surfacing material to be treated to the front end of the cylindeL-said rotatable conveying and mixing mechanism in the cylinder having an extension beyond the front end of the cylinder to engage with, and act upon, the scooped up material before it reaches the cylinder and to operate to assist in feeding said material into the cylinder as the machine progresses.

5. A road material mixing machine comprising a main frame mounted to travel over a road justable frame and disposed in front'of the cylinder, and means disposed in front ofthe cylinder adapted to engage material piling up between the gathering blades and the scraper blade and for delivering said material into the front end of the cylinder. A A

6. A road material mixing machine comprising a main frame mounted to travel over a road to be surfaced, a frame supported by the main frame, means for Vvertically adjusting said frame with relation to the main frame, a cylinder supported in the vertically adjustable frame, a conveying and mixing mechanism rotatably mounted in the cylinder, a scraper blade and a pair of gathering blades carried by the vertically adjustable frame and disposed in front of the cylinder, and a rotatable conveyor disposed in front of the cylinder and adapted to engage material piling up between the gathering blades and the scraper and for delivering said material into the front end of thecylinder.

livering road surfacing material to be treated and for directing it toward the front end of the cylinder, and a conveyor carried by the shaft and disposed forwardly of the cylinder and'engageable with said material for delivering it into the front end of the cylinder.

8. A road material mixing machine comprising a main frame mounted to travel over a road to be surfaced, a frame supported by the main frame, means for verticallyadjusting said frame with relation to the main frame, a cylinder supported in the vertically adjustablevframe, a conveying and mixing mechanism rotatably mounted in the cylinder, means carried by the vertically adjustable frame for gathering and delivering road surfacing material to be treated to the front end of the cylinder, said vertically adjustable frame having means engageable with the road surface on each side of the cylinder to support said frame and the cylinder when i,n operation adapted and arranged to hold said cylinder against rotationv when subjected to the turning torque of the conveying and mixing mechanism.

9. A road material mixing machine comprising a main frame mounted to travel over a road to be a frame supported by the main frame, means for vertically adjusting said frame with relation to the main frame, a cylinder supported in the vertically adjustable frame, a conveying and mixing mechanism rotatably mounted in the cylinder, means carried by the vertically adjustable frame for gathering and delivering road surfacing material to be treated to the front end of the cylinder, and a pair of runners one on each side of the vertically adjustable frame, said runners extendingsubstantially from end to end of the frame and being engageable with the road surface to partially support said frame and the cylinder mounted therein and partially to resistv rotational movement of the frame when subjected to the turning torque of the conveying and mixing mechanism.

10. A road material mixing machine comprising a mainframe mounted for travel over a road to be surfaced, vertically adjustable supporting means disposed adjacent opposite ends of the main frame, a frame suspended from the vertically ad- -justable supporting means, radius rods connecting the suspended frame to the main frame to secure 'the suspended frame against longitudinal movement with relation to the main frame, a cylinder supported in the vertically adjustable frame, a conveying and mixing mechanism mounted in said cylinder, and means carried by thevertically adjustable frame for gathering and delivering road surfacing material to be treated to the cylinder. 11. A road material mixing machine comprising a main frame molmted for travel over a road to be surfaced, a pair of hydraulic jacks secured, to the main frame adjacent the forward end, a

second pair of hydraulic jacks secured to the main frame adjacent the rear end, cross beamsA connecting the respective pairs' of hydraulic jacks, a frame suspended from said cross beams, radius rodsconnectingthe suspended frame tothe main frame to secure the suspended frame against longitudinal movement with relation tov the main frame, means for actuating the hydraulic jacks to raise and lower the suspended frame with relation to the main frame and the road surface over which it travels, a cylinder supported in the suspended frame, conveying and mixing mechanism rotatably mounted in the cylinder, and means carried by the frame for gathering and delivering road surfacing material to be treated to the cylinder.

12. In a machine of the character described, an elongated open ended cylinder, a shaft extending through the cylinder and journaled at opposite ends thereof, a plurality of radially disposed arms secured at spaced intervals along the shaft, a

helical shaped conveyor band secured to said arms y gage material piling up between the gathering blades and the scraper and for delivering the material to the front end of the cylinder and the rst named helical conveyor mounted therein, said nrst and second named conveyors being spaced apart.

13. In a machine of the character described an elongated open ended cylinder, a shaft extending through the cylinder and journaled .at opposite ends thereof, a plurality of radially disposed arms secured at spaced intervals along the shaft, a helical shaped conveyor band secured to said arms and extending from end to end of the cylinder, mixing bands secured to the other arms, a scraper blade disposed in front of the cylinder, a pair of adjustable gathering blades disposed one at each end of the scraper blade, means disposed forward of the cylinder adapted to engage material piling up between theA gathering blades and the scraper and for delivering the material to the front end of the cylinder, means for spraying hot oil on the surface of the material ahead of the scraper while the material is being gathered for delivery to the cylinder, and means for heating thevcylinder to maintain the mix of material and oil in a ready iiowing condition. y

14. A road material mixing machine comprising a Wheel supported' main frame adapted to be connected to a tractor to be pulled over a road to be surfaced, a mixing cylinder carried by the frame, means for gathering up material from the road and for delivering it to the cylinder, a rotatable conveyor and mixer in the cylinder for mixing, conveying and discharging the material -at the rear end -of the cylinder, a trailer unit connected behind the road material mixing machine and carrying a tank containing oil, oil spraying means disposed forward of the mixing cylinder, a pumphaving its discharge side connected with the spray means, and a connection between the suction side offlthe pump and the oil tank on the.

trailer.. f \\,l15. A road material mixing machine compris- "iga wheel supported main frame adapted to be connected to a tractor to be pulled over a road to be surfaced, a mixingccylinder carried by the frame, means for gathering up material from the road and for delivering it to the cylinder, a rotatable conveyor and mixer inthe cylinder for mixing, conveying and discharging the^material at the rear end of the cylinder,'a trailer unit connected behind the road material mixing machine and carrying a tank containing oil, oil spraying means disposed forward of 'the mixing cylinder, a pump having its discharge side connected with the spray means, a connection 'between the suction side of the pump and the oil tank on the trailer, and means for maintaining a predetermined pressure in the oil oil.

and for returning excess l 16. A road material mixing machine comprising a wheel supported main frame adapted to be connected to a tractor to be pulled over a road to be surfaced, a mixing cylinder carried by the frame, means forvgathering up material from the road and for delivering it to the cylinder, a rotatable conveyor and mixerin the cylinder for mixing, conveying and discharging the material at the rear end of the cylinder, a trailer unit connected behind the road material-mixing machine and carrying a tank containing oil, oil spraying. means disposed forward of the mixing cylinder, a pump having its discharge side connected with the spray means, a connection between the suction side of the pumpand the oil tank cn the trailer, a second tank to contain a light fuel oil, and means for directing oil from said last named tank through the pump, the spray means and connections to clean the same.

1'?. A dirt mixing implement comprising an open ended horizontal cylinder, a cover memberon the cylinder; and extending ahead thereof, a scraper blade in front of the cylinder, gathering blades cooperating therewith for delivering ma# terial to the scraper at a point under the extending cover, conveying means in front of the cylinder to engage the material and to feed the same into the cylinder, means in the cylinder to agitate and mix the material passing through the same, and means supporting the cylinder and associated mechanism for movement along the ground.

18. A dirt mixing machine comprising a wheel supported frame, a open ended cylinder supported in the frame, a scraper blade nxed to the cylinder to scrape material from a road surface during forward movement of the frame and to deliver such material into the cylinder, a material-.mixing and conveying unit in the cylinder, longitudinally extending radius rods pivotally connected to the cylinder, and to the wheel supported frame at a point ahead of the cylinder, suspension members supporting the cylinder inv the wheel supported frame, and means on the wheel supported frame for raising and lowering the suspension means and the cylinder' supported thereby. f

- 19. A road material mixing machine of the character described comprising an open ended cylinder adapted to receive material to be mixed in its front end, means to discharge cilento said material, means in the cylinder to mix the oil and material and to discharge the mixture :from the rear end of the cylinder, a furnace under the cylinder having chambers extending lengthwise of the lower portion ofthe cylinder and on opposite sides thereof, the cylinder forming one of the furnace chamber walls and burners mounted in the respective longitudinally extending chamber adjacent one end thereof, said chambers having outlet iiues at the opposite end.

20. A road material mixing machine comprising a vehicle mounted to travel over the road to be surfaced, a cylinder mounted on the vehicle with its axis in the line of travel of the vehicle, 65

discharged through the open rear end of the latter. I

21. A .road surfacing machine comprising a wheeled vehicle, a mixing cylinder mounted on the vehicle substantially parallel with the surface to be treated and adjacent thereto, a scoop on the front end of the cylinder to scoop up the material that is to be delivered into the cylinder, a conveyor extending through a substantial portion of the cylinder and projecting beyond the front end thereof, constructed and arranged to engage the scooped-up material to deliver it initially into the cylinder, said cylinder being open at the rear end and adapted to discharge material delivered into the cylinder by the conveyor, and means associated with the conveyor formixing the material in the cylinder during the progress of the vehicle and to eect said discharge. w22. In a read material mixing machine, the combination of a wheeled vehicle adapted to travel over the road to be surfaced, an open ended mixing cylinder on the vehicle and in substantlal alignment therewith and arranged adjacent'to the surface to be treated, supporting runners on the cylinder, means for raising and low ering the runners and cylinder so that the latter may rest on the runners when the machine is in operation, a scraper for scooping up the material from the roadway preparatory to its delivery into the cylinder as the machine progresses over the 23. A road material mixing machine cox npris'4 ing the combination of a wheeled vehicle, an

open ended cylinder mounted thereon and parallel therewith, a scraper for scooping u-p the material from the'roadway into the cylinder as the machine progresses over the roadway, a screw conveyor, within the 4cylinder and of greater length than the cylinder, with the forward end -of the conveyor extending over the scraper and providing means to engage the scooped-up material and conveying it into the cylinder and mixing it therein, and means carried upon the vehicle for applying oil to the material to be treated before the material reaches the cylinder.

CLYDE W. WOOD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2619013 *Oct 1, 1946Nov 25, 1952Harold R PauleyApparatus for reconditioning road-surfacing materials
US4261669 *Apr 6, 1979Apr 14, 1981Yasuo EdoMethod and apparatus for repairing asphalt concrete paved road surface
US4616934 *Nov 5, 1984Oct 14, 1986Brock J DonaldDrum mix asphalt plant with knock-out box and separate coater
US4990025 *May 3, 1989Feb 5, 1991Soil Stabilization Inc.Soil stabilizing method and apparatus
US5538340 *Dec 14, 1993Jul 23, 1996Gencor Industries, Inc.Counterflow drum mixer for making asphaltic concrete and methods of operation
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/92
International ClassificationE01C19/02, E01C19/10
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/1054
European ClassificationE01C19/10E