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Publication numberUS1997996 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1935
Filing dateJun 27, 1932
Priority dateJun 27, 1932
Publication numberUS 1997996 A, US 1997996A, US-A-1997996, US1997996 A, US1997996A
InventorsCarstens Albert N
Original AssigneeCharles R Holton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wood veneered board or panel and process for making the same
US 1997996 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

p 6, 1935. A. N. CARSTENS 1,997,996

WOOD VENEERED BOARD 0R" PANEL AND PROCESS FOR MAKING THE SAME Filed June 27, 1932 Patented Apr. 16, 1935 v UNITED STATES PATENT orricr.

WOOD VENEEBED BOARD OB PANEL AND PROCESS FOR MAKING THE SAME Albert N. Garstens, Park Ridge, m., m... to Charles R. Bolton, Chicago, 111.

Application June 27, 1932, Serial No. 619,618

8 Claims. (01. 144--309) This invention relates to a. novel and improved ing, cracking or' splitting. I take the sheets of wood veneered board or panel and a process veneer in the condition as to moisture as they for making the same, and consists of the matcome from thelathe or slicer and assemble them ters hereinafter described and more particularin piles of sheets laid flat, the one upon the 1y pointed out in the appended claims. other, with say eight to twelve sheets to a pile. 5

The object of the invention is to produce a The piles of veneer sheets are then placedbefiat non-warped wood veneered board or panel tween dry boards of wood, fibre, plaster, or other of simple and economical construction and of material capable of absorbing moisture, and are artistic appearance, in which but one face of the allowed to stand at room temperature (say about board or panel is covered by the veener, and 70 Fahrenheit) until the moisture content or 10 which comprises any of the familiar composition the veneer sheets has been reduced to aproxiboards as fibre board, plaster board and the mately 4 to 10 percent by weight. This may be like, as a base and a facing of thin wood veneer. determined by making moisture tests by weight Instead of using a composition board as the in the usual manner. This is a slow drying proc- 16 base, all y'w od board may be used. The ess at ordinary room temperature and the veneer invention thus eliminates the core with the op-' sheets dry without splitting, curling or crackp balancing V n r-sh ppli to the ing and will be flat when removed from the piles. faces thereof, now constituting the commercial The number of sheets in each pile is determined veneered board. by the rate of drying, which should be so car- 20 This applicationis a continuation in part of ried on that the required dryness will be at- 20 m v-P din application Serial Number 47 ,571 tained before mildew or rot appears, but must filed August 29, 1930. not be so rapid that curling or splitting will The many advantages of the invention will occur-{as when too fewsheets are included in appear more fully as I proceed with my specithe piles. Such drying usually takes in the fl i neighborhood of seventy-two hours, and may be 2 In the drawing: for a longer or shorter period, depending upon Figure 1 is a perspective view of a piece of atmospheric conditions.

my improved board. After the sheet is dried, it is ready for appli'- I Figure 2 is a view representing a section of the cation to a board or base. It is secured to the same. face of said board by means of a glue or ad- Figure 3 is a rear view of a board with two hesive, which is of such composition that it will sheets of wood veneer, illustrating the method remain flexible after setting. of making a joint between two adjacent sheets I have found that a good animal glue, hide or where more than one sheet is required to make bone, dissolved in water and mixed with glyca panel. erine will well answer the purpose. I have at- 35 Figure 4 is a part sectional view of the board tained good results by a mixture of 50 pounds transversely of said joint in a plane indicated 7 of glue, 60 poimds of water and pounds of by'the line H of Figure 3. glycerine. In making the mixture, the glue is Referring now to that embodiment of the in,- heated in the water in the usual fashion. After 40 vention as illustrated in the drawing:-Ill inthe glue is dissolved, the glycerine is added. 4 dicates the improved board. It consists pref- The glue thus prepared is then applied in a er blypf a mpo n y base, a 1 1 thin, even coat over the entire surface of the p Plaster board fibrous board S c as board or base either by brush or byrolls and prefthose known to the trade as Beaverboard, Maerably at a temperature of. about 150 degrees -i5 sonite, Cellotex, or the like. This base is of that Fahrenheit. The veneer sheet is then applied thickness and weight required for the particuand is adhered to the board by pressure either lar purpose for which the improved panel or in alpress or by means of rolls. After a numboard is to be used. ll indicates a facing of her of panels or boards have been thus faced with wood veneer. Said veneer should preferably be veneer sheets, they are baled in stacks, one upon from 1/60 to1/150 of an inch in thickness, bethe other, between caul boards in a press. In 50 ing in this respect much thinner than the usual assembling the boards or panels in the stacks,

' sheets of veneer now ordinarily used in the manthe veneer 'facings are placed proximate to each 'ufacture of furniture, desks, and the like. other with waxed paper or the like interposed Veneer of the thinness described requires spebetween. If the backs of the boards or bases are 6 cial treatment in drying to preventit from curlsumciently smooth, they may also be assembled I.

with their facings proximate to the backs. Cold caul boards may be used,hot caul boards are not required. The caul boards are interposed at intervals to compensate for any slack or unevenness in the stack; In the press the stacks of boards or panels are subjected to pressure, the amount of which depends upon the density of the veneer. The pressure is designed to force the glue into or through the interstices of the veneer.

After the bales have been brought to the ,desired pressure in the press, they are removed and the veneered boards or panels are continued under that pressure until the glue is set. The boards or panels are then removed from the baling clamps and are stacked to dry. In stacking them they are separated'by means of sticks" spaced to permit air passages between the boards. Preferably in stacking, the veneer faces are turned downward so that the base of each board lies below the veneer face of the one next above. This facilitates drying. After the boards are dried out, the veneer facing is finished by sandpaper-ing in the usual manner.

Owing to the extreme thinness of the veneer, the glue under pressure will be forced into or through the innumerable small cells or interstices found in such thin veneer and will suffice as a filler, it being unnecessary in the improved board to apply any other filler to the outer surface of the veneer. The material of the bond, namely the glue or other adhesive, thus becomes a'- substantial part of the layer of veneer. In some cases, and in particular in the case of some woods, where the veneer sheets contain a maximum of the small interstices, the glue may penctrate and come out on the outer surface of the veneer to such an extent as to flood said'surface. This delays drying and increases the amount of sandpapering required. To overcome this difliculty, I prefer to add to the glue a dryer and filler such as whiting, powdered talc, or chalk and plaster of Paris. I preferably use about 3 percent talcand 4percent plaster of Paris, making 7 percent of the entire combination, as this appears to give me the better results. When made to include this dryer, the flooding of the outer surface of the veneer is checked, drying is facilitated and made more rapid and this without interfering with the filling of the veneer from its rear face, as hereinbefore described.

The bond of the veneer to the board is flexible and as a result, the pull of the veneer tending to warp the board is reduced to a minimum.

At any rate, a board with veneer applied as described, will not warp and there is no'necessity for an additional sheet of veneer on the rear face of the board, such as is now required in applying veneer to board or panels, where a second sheet of veneer to oppose the drawing action of the first sheet of veneer has always been required.

In making a butting joint between two adjacent sheets of veneer, I first use jointing process to get smooth edges, then butt the edges of the two sheets together and lay them back upwards on a suitable table or support. I then take very thin tissue gumm'ed tape of about 1/300 an taping machine. I then apply the glue to the face ofthe board, which is then laid down on the rear face of the veneer, thus crossed at the joints by the said tissue paper strip or strips, and apply pressure either by roll or by press as hereinbefore described. After the glue joint is dry, it may be found that the veneer sheet, by expansion, has overlapped at some places. When sandpapering and finishing the face of the veneer, these overlapped pieces are lightly sandpapered out with the result that in the end the veneer presents a face with a uniform butt joint throughout.

It will be noted that in this treatment the removal of the paper used at the joints as heretofore practiced in veneering work, is eliminated, obviating the heavy sanding usually done. Sanding through face stock of panels is also eliminated. On account of the compressibility of composition board, the thin tissue paperbetween the rear face of the veneer and the front face of the composition board is, by the pressure employed in applying the veneer, indented into the composition board so that a smooth unbroken face is presented at the joints. Obviously, if the board or other base is harder than the veneer, the embedding will be in the veneer either wholly or in part rather than entirely in the base.

My invention makes it possible to use wall board, plaster board and other insulating board in places where, for appearance and beauty, 2. wood panel is desirable. When the improved board is in place with the veneer face only presented to view, it has the look of a solid wood board.

The many uses of my improved board will be obvious to those familiar with the art. A use not heretofore mentioned is in building construction for door and window frames, window sills, and like constructions, where a comparatively heavy board is necessary for strength. Such boards of wood material are expensive. By the use of my improved board a much cheaper composition board of insulation material of the required thickness may be substituted at greatly reduced cost. In the use of such board the thin veneer sheet should be applied not only to the face of the board, but also to all exposed edges or margins, thereby presenting a composition board of the required thickness, which, to all appearances,

is solid board of material of that of the wood veneer.

I claim as my invention:-

1. An improved veneered board, comprising a base and wood veneer sheets bonded to one face thereof, said veneer sheets abutting at their proximate edges, thin paper strips interposed between the base and the sheets of veneer in overlapping relation with said butting edges and embedded between the proximate faces of the base and the veneer sheets.

2. The process of making a veneered board, comprising a base with a veneer face, which consists:--in assembling thin sheets of veneer containing the moisture substantially as when out in piles of sheets laid flat, in stacking the piles of veneer sheets with boards of material capable of absorbing moisture interposed between adjacent piles; in then drying the same at ordinary temperature to a moisture content by weight of substantially 4 to 10 percent; in applying to said base an adhesive flexible. when set in a thin even coating at a temperature of about 150 degrees Fahrenheit; in then applying one of the dry sheets of veneer to the face of the board thus.

treated; and in applying pressure to said sheet to force the glue into the veneer, maintaining said pressure until the glue is substantially set.

3. The process of making a veneered board, comprising a base with a veneer face, which consistsr-in assembling thin sheets of veneer containing the moisture substantially as when out in piles of sheets laid flat, in stacking the piles of veneer sheets with boards of material capable of absorbing moisture interposed between adjacent piles; in then drying the same at ordinarytemperature; in applying to said base an adhesive mixed with glycerine in a thin even coating; in then applying one of the dry sheets of veneer to the face of the board thus treated; and in applying pressure to said sheet to force the glue into the veneer, maintaining said pressure until the glue is substantially set.

4. The process of making a veneered board, comprising a base with a veneer face including two or more veneer sheets, whichconsists-in butting the veneer sheets together; applying to said veneer'sheetsby pressure toembed said paper strips. I

5. A substantially non-warped firished veneered panel, comprising a thin and relatively inflexible base and a wood veneer sheet of substantially '1/60 of an inch or less in thickness bonded to one face only of said base, said bond comprising an adhesive which is flexible when dry or set.

6. A substantially non-warped finished veneered panel, comprising a flat base made of a relatively inflexible composition board and a wood veneer sheet of 1/60 of an inch or less in thickness bonded to one face only of said base, said bond comprising an adhesive which is flexible when dry or set.

7. A substantially non-warped finished veneered panel, comprising a flat base made of relatively inflexible composition board and a wood veneer sheet of 1/60 of an inch or less in thickness bonded to one face only of said base, said bond consisting of an adhesive containing glycerine. 1

8. A substantially flat finished veneered. panel, comprising a flat base made of a relatively inflexible composition board and a veneer sheet of substantially 1/60 of an inch orless in thickness bonded to one face only of said base, said bond being of a composition to permanently prevent warp or twist, of the finished panel or of any of the parts forming said panel.

ALBERT N. 'CARSTENS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2710276 *Mar 13, 1951Jun 7, 1955Long Bell Lumber CompanyVeneered consolidated products and method of making the same
US2766162 *May 27, 1953Oct 9, 1956Masonite CorpMethod of preparing lignocellulose hardboard
US3007502 *Jun 3, 1958Nov 7, 1961Mikroholz G M B HWooden veneer and method of applying same to a base
US3295571 *Feb 26, 1964Jan 3, 1967Per BorkVeneer production
US4012882 *Apr 19, 1973Mar 22, 1977Industrialised Building Systems LimitedStructural building panels
EP0298229A2 *May 20, 1988Jan 11, 1989Theodor Hymmen FirmaProcess for sheeting one or both sides of thin plates with film-like material using a band press or a laminating apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/61, 428/529, 144/332, 156/305, 428/332, 156/304.3
International ClassificationB27D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB27D1/00
European ClassificationB27D1/00