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Publication numberUS1998327 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1935
Filing dateApr 10, 1933
Priority dateApr 10, 1933
Publication numberUS 1998327 A, US 1998327A, US-A-1998327, US1998327 A, US1998327A
InventorsVane Mcguire Clarence
Original AssigneeVane Mcguire Clarence
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inhalant device
US 1998327 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Apri@ m, 1,935. v, MCGUIRE 1,998,327

INHALANT DEVICE Filed April l0, 1955 INVENTOR.

Patented Apr. 16, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFlcE rNnALAN'r DEVICE clarence vme McGuire, Detroit, Mich, Application April 10, 1933, Serial No. 665,322

6Claims.

This invention relates to inhalant devices, particularly for the relief of colds, etc.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide an inhalant device which permits the sufferer to inhale fresh, heated air. In the device, means are provided whereby the air may be treated, in passing, by contact with a suitable medicament, preferably of oleaginous nature. Further, the device is provided with means whereby the air may be humidified, in passing, to any desired extent.

More particularly, the device includes a vessel whose air outlet is connected to a face mask by means of a flexible tube or the like, it being intended that the sufferer inhale and exhale through the face mask.

Further objects of the invention will presently appear upon reference to the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the same, which embodiment is shown in detail in the appended drawing. In this drawing:

Figure 1 shows the device in section;

Figure 2 is a diagrammatic view of the electrical connections of the same;

Figure 3 is a section as if on line 3 3 of Figure 1;

Figure 4 shows an alternative form of face mask, to small scale.

Referring to the drawing, it will be seen that the device inc1udes a vessel Ill resting upon and preferably frictionally fitted and sealed to a foundation or bottom plate II provided with rubber buttons I2, these spacing the bottom of the device from the table or other support upon which the device rests so that air may pass under the device and up through the same, as indicatedby the arrows.

The air inlet is in the form of a tube I I pressed upwardly from the bottom plate II and open at its upper end. A seat I5 is formed at the lower end of the tube Il and in this seat is disposed a heating plate I8 which may be of glazed or unglazed porcelain, and which may be provided with suitable heating coils I1 and Il. It is observed that the heating plate, including its coils, are not specically new but are of a type that can be purchased in the open market. Ijhe heating plate is provided with an aperture I! therethrough, which permits air from under the bottom Il to pass through the inlet tube Il.

In the form shown the heating plate I8 is secured in its seat I5 by a bead 20, and the plate may be snapped into its seat past the bead and will be held in its seat by the bead. after the plate has been inserted in its seat.

lless likely to occur.

(Cl. 12B-192) The upper end of the inlet tube, as above stated, is open and may be covered by a sheetof gauze 2|, the latter being removably mounted and held on the upper end of the tube by means of a spring wire. 22 whose ends 23 are crossed 5 to permit easy application of the gauze to the upper end of the tube. -On the gauze may be poured a suitable medicament of oleaginous or other nature, as desired, to process .the air flowing through the inlet tube I4, gobs of the medicament being shown in place on the gauze.

'Ihe upper portion of the vessel I0 is open and is provided with a screw threaded capy 2l, which may be sealed with respect to the vessel itself, by means of a suitable sealing gasket 25. 15

Into the lower part of the vessel I0, and to a level below the upper end of the inlet tube Il, may be poured water 26 for humidifying the air flowing through the inlet tube. The waterand the oleaginous medicament disposed on the surgical gauze may be introduced into the tank through the open upper end of the same when theI cover cap 24 is removed.

Disposed against the side wall of the tank and in the upper portion of the latter, above the 25 level of the water, is a plate 21 bent to form a passage 28, open at the top as at`29, and communicating with an opening 30 having outwardly directed edges, as at V3l. The passage 28 and its associated portions constitute an outlet for the tank which is observed draws air from the upper portion of the tank and directs it downwardly to outlet at the lower portion of the tank.

It is observed that it is more desirable to draw air from the top of the tank, where `it will have passed through the mixing chamber indicated' generally as at 32. and it is also more desirable to have the ilexible tube 33 which connects to the outlet flange 3|, connected to the tank at the bottom thereof, so that upsetting of the tank is interior of the mask so that air passing through .50v

the tube will be directed to the mouth and nostrils of the sufferer over whose face the mask is placed, it being observed that theedge 39 of the mask is suitably contoured to fit the average face withl a relatively close and air tight fit. A valve in the nature of a rubber flap 4I, cemented or otherwise secured to the face mask, is provided to control the opening 3l.

Ehe pliable nature of the mask material cooperates with the contour of line 39 to insure a close. but comfortable t. This valve opens inwardly on inhalation, and serves to close the opening 39 on exhalation. A second opening in the mask, referenced 44. is provided for exhaln.- tion and this opening is controlled by a ap valve 45 secured to the mask in such a fashion as to open outwardly only.

The heating plate coils I1-I8 are positioned so that the former heats the air in inlet tube I4 while'the latter heats the water-2B.

'I'he heating plate I6 and its coils I 'l-II are connected by conductors 50, 5I, 52, to a suitably mounted switch 53, which in turn is connected to line conductors 54, 55, by a conventional twoconductor cable 56 having a conventional plug 51 on its end. The switch is in the nature of a selector and includes a switch arm 58 adapted to assume anyone of three positions, shown in Figure 2.

When the arm 58 is in position I, it will not connect any of the heating coils to the line and, therefore, neither the air nor the water in the tank will be heated by the coils.

When the arm is in position 2, the air heating coil will be energized, the water heating coil not being energized. The air in tube I4, being heated, will heat the water to a certain extent. Further, as the air temperature rises, the water will be heated more and more automatically, and this is desirable since a greater air temperature should be accompanied by a greater heating effect on the water. When the arm is in position 3, both coils will be energized and both the air and water will be heated.

In Figure 4, there is shown a face mask 6h which is so constructed that the air valves 6| and 52 thereof, controlling the inlet and outlet openings 63-64, respectively, will operate satisfactorily whether the mask be in horizontal position, as shown, on the face of a prone patient, or in vertical position (90 counterclockwise from Figure 4) on the face of a patient who is sitting or standing. The valves are tapered, so as to be heavier near their free edges than at their secured edges, and tend to close, due to gravity, regardless of the position of the patient, the opening of the valves being in opposition to the influence of gravity. This type of mask is extremely well suited for the use to which it is put.

Further, the mask may be provided with a groove 65 for the reception of an elastic band which holds the mask in place against the face of the patient.

Now having described a preferred embodiment of the invention reference will be had to the following claims which determine the scope of the invention. I claim:

l. In an inhalant device of the character described, a vessel having an aperture in its bottom, a tube surrounding said aperture and projecting upwardly for a distance, to form an air inlet, the vessel being supported on legs which space the bottom from the supporting surface so that air can pass under said bottom to said inlet, liquid on said bottom and between said tube and the vessel side wall, and a heatingplate under said bottom and having air heating means in the air inlet path, and an air outlet at the lower part of said vessel, near the bottom, the outlet being connected to the upper interior of the vessel, through a baffle passage.

2. In an inhalant device of the character described, a vessel having an aperture in its bottom, a tube surrounding said aperture and projecting upwardly for a distance, to form an air inlet, the vessel being supported on legs which space the bottom from the supporting surface so that air can pass under said bottom to said inlet, liquid on said bottom and between said tube and the vessel side wall, and a heating plate under said bottom and having air heating means in the air inlet path, and liquid heating means under the liquid, and an air outlet at the lower part of said vessel, near the bottom, the outlet being connected to the upper interior of the vessel, through a baille passage.

3. In an inhalant device of the character described, a vessel having an aperture in its bottom. a tube surrounding said aperture and projecting upwardly for a distance, to form an air inlet, the vessel being supported on legs which space the bottom from the supporting surface so that air can pass under said bottom to said in1etllq uid on said bottom and between said tube and the vessel side wall. and a heating plate under said bottom and having air heating means in the air inlet path, and an air outlet at the lower part of said vessel, near the bottom, the outlet being connected to the upper interior of the vessel, through a baffle passage, and a face mask connected to said outlet by a flexible tube.

4. An air inhalant device of the character described including a vessel, air inlet and outlet tubes passing through a wall portion of said'vessel adjacent the bottom thereof and terminating at a point considerably above said bottom, air heating means in the air path, a liquid body in said vessel surrounding the air inlet tube and having its upper surface below the upper end of said air inlet tube, and a fabric barrier on the upper end of one of said tubes and thereby interposed in the air path from the inlet to the outlet.

5. An air inhalant device of the character described including a vessel, an air inlet tube passing through a wall portion of said vessel adjacent the bottom thereof and terminating at a point considerably above said bottom, an air outlet, air heating means in the air path, a liquid body in said vessel surrounding the air inlet tube and having its upper surface below the upper end of said air inlet tube, and a fabric barrier interposed in the air path from the inlet to the outlet.

6. An air inhalant device of the character described including a vessel, an air inlet tube passing through a wall portion of said vessel adjacent the bottom thereof and terminating at a point considerably above said bottom, an air outlet, air heating means in the air inlet path, a liquid body in said vessel surrounding the air inlet tube and havng its upper surface below the upper end of said air inlet tube, means for heating and vaporizing said liquid body, the space above said liquid body, into which opens the air inlet tube, being a mixing space into which enters heated air and liquid vapors, the air being heated and the liquid being vaporized before the heated air and the liquid vapors enter the mixing chamber and mix.

CLARENCE V. MCGUIRE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3045670 *Nov 10, 1958Jul 24, 1962Hirtz & Co FaInhalator
US3110301 *Sep 23, 1959Nov 12, 1963Bricker Lester JHuman body heater
US3511236 *Apr 8, 1968May 12, 1970Hankscraft CoVaporizer for delivery of vapor to facial area
US3659604 *Mar 30, 1970May 2, 1972Fisher & PaykelHumidifying means
US3815597 *Nov 24, 1972Jun 11, 1974W GoettelmanPipe inhaler
US4190052 *Dec 18, 1978Feb 26, 1980The Gillette CompanySteam facial apparatus
US4903850 *Mar 14, 1989Feb 27, 1990Bernard FrankVaporizing device
US5086766 *Apr 6, 1989Feb 11, 1992Virotherm Laboratories Ltd.Medical breathing apparatus
US5456247 *Aug 26, 1993Oct 10, 1995Iowa State University Research Foundation, Inc.Method for delivering drugs soluble in a vaporization vehicle
US5645049 *Jul 5, 1994Jul 8, 1997Trudell Medical LimitedExhalation valve for face mask with spacer chamber connection
US5701886 *Aug 7, 1995Dec 30, 1997Ryatt; SadieTreatment non-rebreather assembly and method for delivering oxygen and medication
US5755221 *Oct 24, 1994May 26, 1998Bisgaard; HansAerosol inhaler with piston dump
US5988160 *Apr 25, 1997Nov 23, 1999Trudell Medical LimitedExhalation valve for face mask with spacer chamber connection
US7004162Sep 30, 1999Feb 28, 2006Canadian Monaghan, Ltd.Exhalation valve
US7013896May 6, 2002Mar 21, 2006Trudell Medical InternationalMask with inhalation valve
US7084355Apr 8, 2003Aug 1, 2006International Business Machines CorporationMultilayer printed circuit board
DE3407047A1 *Feb 27, 1984Sep 5, 1985Gehring A E Therap Gesund ArtInhalation device or the like
WO1990011000A1 *Mar 13, 1990Sep 20, 1990Epi Prod Usa IncVaporizing device
WO1994028959A1 *Jun 3, 1994Dec 22, 1994Schrader Barthold VonInhalator
WO1995005861A1 *Aug 25, 1994Mar 2, 1995Univ Iowa State Res Found IncMethod for delivering vaporized drugs
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/203.27, 128/203.29, 392/403
International ClassificationA61M16/10, A61M15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M15/00, A61M2016/109
European ClassificationA61M15/00