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Publication numberUS1998634 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1935
Filing dateSep 20, 1932
Priority dateSep 20, 1932
Publication numberUS 1998634 A, US 1998634A, US-A-1998634, US1998634 A, US1998634A
InventorsJames M Oberti
Original AssigneeJames M Oberti
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dust cloth holder
US 1998634 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 23, 1935. J. M. OBERTI DUST CLOTH HOLDER Filed Sept. 20, 1952 7 IN V EN TOR.

' Jwvzs M 02132 77 ATTORNEYS.

Patented Apr. 23, 1935 "UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE DUST cLo'rn 110mm James M. Obertl, San Francisco, Calif. Application September 20, 1932, Serial No. 634,042

x 3 Claims. (01. 15-231) My invention relates to improvements in dust of the part I cause the edges I of the flexible cloth holders, and it consists of the combinations, member B to extend downwardly at an angle constructions and arrangements hereinafter deand to space the part 4 above the floor 8, see scribed and claimed. Figure 3. The handle is composed of a wooden An object of my invention is to provide a dust portion 9 that is received in a ferrule III. Fig- 5 cloth holder which makes use of a frame for a ure 2 shows how the ferrule has a pivotal conresilient member, the resilient member projecting nection at II with a clip I2. The clip in turn beyond all of the marginal sides of the frame. has a pivotal connection at I3 with a bracket I4, The device further makes use of a dusting cloth the bracket being secured to the top piece I. The

that extends across the under side of the frame result is that the handle C has a universal con- 10 and has its ends wrapped around rollers which nection with the frame A.

, are removably carried by the frame. The means A dusting cloth E may be of any length desired for securing the rollers to the frame consists of and has a width greater than the length of the spring pressed clamps and these may be manuframe A, see Figure 4. The cloth has a portion ally freed from the rollers when it is desired to passed beneath the frame A and the ends of the 15 bring a new portion of the cloth in a position to cloth are wrapped around rollers or rods I5 and extend across the bottom of the frame. I6. The rods are held in position on the top of A handle is secured to the frame and has a the frame by a mechanism presently to be deuniversal connection therewith, and this permits scribed. Figure 4 shows how the cloth projects the operator to swing the frame into various anbeyond the ends of the frame A and the cloth 20 gular positions by merely rotating the handle acts as a protector for the frame and for the about its longitudinal axis. In this way the frame pieces of furniture that may be contacted by the can be moved into corners and other places around device in use. 1 furniture which would be hard to clean with a The rods or rollers I5 and I6 are removably frame having a handle rigidly connected thereto. held in place on the frame A by spring pressed 25 Other objects and advantages will appear in clamps I1 and I8, see Figure 2. The clamps are the following specification, and the novel features secured to the ends of a leaf spring I9 and the of the device will be particularly pointed out in spring is secured to the part I by the bracket I4. the appended claims. Normally the clamps I'I hold the rods I5 and I6 My invention is illustrated in the accompanyin the position shown in Figure 3. I have pro- 3 ing drawing forming part of this application, in vided flexible members 20 and 2| which are conwhich nected to the clamps I1 and I8 by U-shaped Figure 1 is a top plan view of the device; members 22 and 23. A cord 24 is connected to Figure 2 is an enlarged perspective view of a the flexible members 20 and 2| and Figure 4 portion of the device in which the left hand end shows this cord as being passed through an eye- 35 shows a transverse section; let 25 secured to the handle 9, and as being pro- Figure 3 is an end view showing the cloth and vided with a knob 26. When the operator wishes rollers in position; and to move the clamps I1 and I8 upwardly he merely- Figure 4 is a perspective view of the entire depulls on the knob 26 and this through the medium vice. of the cord 24 and the flexible members 20 and 40 In carrying out my invention I provide a frame 2| will lift the clamps aw from the a In indicated generally at A, a flexible member indithis way the rods I5 and I6 are freed. cated at B, a handle shown at C, and a dusting From the foregoi g descrip f t e Va ious cloth shown at E in Figures 3 and 4. The frame parts of the device, the op ration ther of may A is composed of an upper member I having inbe readily understood. a 45 clined edges 2 with portions 3 bent back upon The device can be used without the dusting themselves. A bottom member 4 has its edges cloth if desired. When using the device in this 5 bent back upon themselves. The members I manner the flexible member B will yieldingly enand 2 receive the flexible member B preferably ge with the floor and will move the dirt along made of rubber and the parts I, 4 and B are sethe surface of the floor. If desired one of the 50 cured together by bolts 6,01 other suitable means. rods I5 or I6 with the entire length of cloth Figure 1 shows how the member B projects bewrapped therearound can be secured to the frame yond the edges of the part I. The member B A by the clamps I1 and I 8, and be placed on the also projects beyond the edges of the part 4. frame adjacent to the advancing edge I of the Figure 2 illustrates how the inclined portions 2 flexible member 3. The rod and cloth in this 55 instance will act as a stop and prevent the dirt from passing over the top of the frame A, while the device is being moved forwardly on the floor. It should be noted that inclining of the sides results in a better sweeping action and further results in spacing of the part 4 above the floor so that the metal part cannot engage with the floor to mar it. The dust cloth E will also collect and hold more material and the sweeper can adjust itself to unevenness in the floor.

When using the dusting cloth E the cloth is preferably dampened and the ends are wrapped around the rods l5 and It so that the unused portions of the cloth will be wrapped adjacent to the rods. In this way the unused portions of the cloth are prevented from drying out too rapidly. The cloth when secured to the frame will take the positions shown in Figures 3 and 4. The portion of the cloth disposed beneath the frame will act as a dust collector while the advance rod I6 will act as a stop and prevent the larger pieces of dirt from passing over the top of the frame.

When the operator wishes to provide the undersurface of the frame with a new portion of cloth, 1

he merely lifts the knob 26 and this frees the rollers l5 and i6 and permits them to roll off from the frame A by gravity. The frame can now be entirely removed from the cloth, and rollers, by merely lifting the handle 9 and it is not necessary for theoperator to stoop down when freeing the-frame from the rollers and cloth. The operator can now with his foot roll the roller IS on the floor to wrap up the soiled portion of cloth. This movement will cause the other roller to revolve and to provide a cleaned and dampened portion of cloth between the rollers. The frame A can now be lifted and placed over the cleaned portion of the cloth. The operator now moves the knob 26 upwardly, and with his feet can roll the rods or rollers I6 and I5 upwardly on the inclined portions of the frame, and when the rods are disposed adjacent to the leaf spring IS the knob 26 can be freed, and this will cause the clamps I I and I8 to again engage with the rollers. It will be seen that the entire operation of bringing a clean portion of cloth into a position underlying the frame can be accomplished without the necessity of the operator kneeling down or stooping over for any part of the operation. The cloth is preferably made of said frame, and a U shaped cloth clamping member secured at each end of said spring, said U shaped members extending transversely across and having their legs' extending down along the sides of said frame.

2. In a dust cloth holder, a flat, elongated rectangular frame, a dust cloth passing underneath the frame, two rollers having opposite ends of the dust cloth wound thereon and means for releasably mounting the two rollers upon the top of the frame adjacent and substantially parallel to each of the longer sides, the longer sides of the frame being inclined outwardly and downwardly substantially from the top to the bottom of the frame for permitting the rollers to be rolled up on top of the frame from a position on the floor, or vice versa.

3. In a dust cloth holder, a flat, elongated rectangular frame, a dust cloth passing underneath the frame, two rollers having opposite ends of the dust cloth woundthereon, means for releasably mounting the two rollers upon the top of the frame adjacent and substantially parallel to each of the longer sides, and a common operating means for releasing the two rollers, the longer sides of the frame being inclined outwardly and downwardly substantially from the top to the bottom of the frame for permitting the rollers to be rolled up on top of the frame from a position on the floor, or vice versa.

JAMES M. OBERTI.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2739329 *May 10, 1954Mar 27, 1956Illinois Duster & Brush CoMop holder
US2755495 *May 27, 1953Jul 24, 1956Fuller Brush CoMop frame and handle connecting device
US2902909 *Oct 9, 1956Sep 8, 1959Gottfried ReissingerDrag-plough for use on roads and highways
US2940800 *May 31, 1956Jun 14, 1960American Marietta CoSwivel socket connection
US2943892 *Jul 11, 1956Jul 5, 1960American Marietta CoSwivel connector for mops
US6305046Aug 13, 1999Oct 23, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyCleaning implements having structures for retaining a sheet
US6484346Aug 15, 2001Nov 26, 2002The Procter & Gamble CompanyCleaning implements having structures for retaining a sheet
US6591442Feb 9, 2001Jul 15, 2003Kaminstein Imports, Inc.Flexible mop base
US6651290Aug 9, 2002Nov 25, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyCleaning implements having structures for retaining a sheet
US7707679 *Feb 9, 2007May 4, 2010Ronald Alexander YoungSqueegee device
US7716776 *Mar 20, 2008May 18, 2010Illinois Tool Works Inc.Flat mop for use with wipers for controlled environments
US9226639 *May 27, 2015Jan 5, 2016Miin-Shiou SheuFlat mop tool
US20070199171 *Feb 9, 2007Aug 30, 2007Young Ronald ASqueegee device
US20080256736 *Mar 20, 2008Oct 23, 2008Illinois Tool Works Inc.Flat mop for use with wipers for controlled environments
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/231, 56/DIG.180, 15/121, 403/111, 15/144.2
International ClassificationA47L13/44
Cooperative ClassificationY10S56/18, A47L13/44
European ClassificationA47L13/44